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Armorer Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'armorer'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 50 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1317-1321)
Inhabitants of London (1352-1374)
Letter Book G of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1352-1374)
Recipients of grants of land by the Crown; and other grantors and grantees (1427-1516)
Grants of land by the Crown were enrolled on the Charter Rolls: but this series of records was also used by other magnates and religious houses as a way of having their own deeds inspected, confirmed and registered. It will be seen from this that some of the material described in these inspeximuses dates back to a considerably earlier period. In addition, there is an appendix of fragments of charter roll material from 1215 and 1286 to 1288. The royal grants enrolled relate not only to land, but also to various privileges that were part of the royal prerogative. Most of the material is from England, the remainder relating to Ireland, Wales and possessions in France, but virtually nothing from Scotland, which was an independent kingdom at this period.

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Recipients of grants of land by the Crown; and other grantors and grantees
 (1427-1516)
Freemen of London (1540-1550)
The long series of mediaeval registers and books of admission of the freemen of London was destroyed by fire in 1786. Thirty surviving charred leaves were gathered together and rebound, becoming Egerton MS 2408 in the British Museum. The order is jumbled and generally speaking none can be dated with certainty, although all belong to the very end of the reign of Henry VIII and the start of the reign of his son, Edward VI. These are pages from the admission books. Each entry here usually gives the name of the person admitted to the freedom; his father's name, address and occupation; his entitlement to the freedom, usually by having served out an apprenticeship to a citizen, naming the master and his trade. Then there may follow a cross-reference to M. or N., being two volumes of another set of official books denoted by the letters of the alphabet, and following each other in chronological sequence, which evidently gave details of entries into apprenticeships. These other books no longer exist: but the dates given for entry do identify the start of the apprenticeship, and so give by implication a date for the eventual admission to freedom. In the margin is the name of the city ward and the total of the fee and fine paid on admission.

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Freemen of London
 (1540-1550)
Tradesmen of York (1272-1558)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city.Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 19,900 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year, the year being here reckoned as starting at Michaelmas (29 September) until 1373, and thence at Candlemas (2 February). Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; and those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

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Tradesmen of York
 (1272-1558)
Anglo-Scottish relations (1509-1589)
The State Papers Relating to Scotland is the collection of English government documents dealing with relations with Scotland when the latter was still an independent country.

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Anglo-Scottish relations
 (1509-1589)
Cecil Manuscripts (1583-1589)
Letters and papers of William Cecil lord Burghley, Lord Treasurer of England.

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Cecil Manuscripts
 (1583-1589)
Traders in Canterbury (1392-1592)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, transcribed and privately printed in 1904 the lists of the Intrantes - those persons, not being free of the city, who paid the annual fine to trade - for the period 1392 to 1592. The names are arranged by ward (Burgate, Newyngate, Westgate, Worgate and Northgate, and give full name, (sometimes) occupation, and fee paid.

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Traders in Canterbury
 (1392-1592)
Secretary of State's Papers (1596)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1596)
Secretary of State's Papers (1600)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1600)
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