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Allberry Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'allberry'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 14 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1701-1753)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1755 to 1833 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1701-1753)
National ArchivesMasters of clerks and apprentices (1762)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1762.

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Masters of clerks and apprentices
 (1762)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices (1769)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1769.

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Masters of Apprentices
 (1769)
Wandsworth Burials (1775)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.

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Wandsworth Burials
 (1775)
Wandsworth Burials (1780)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own.

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Wandsworth Burials
 (1780)
National ArchivesApprentices and clerks (1795)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1795. IR 1/36

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Apprentices and clerks
 (1795)
Bankrupts' Estates (1848)
Bankrupts' estates for England and Wales vested in assignees: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Bankrupts' Estates
 (1848)
Gentry in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Court Directory', listing alphabetically by surname and christian name the upper class residents of the capital with their postal addresses. 'In order to afford space for the addresses, the abbreviation "esq." for esquire has no longer been appended to each name in the Court Directory. It should be understood that such should be added to the name of every gentleman in the following pages to which no inconsistent addition is affixed.' Decorations, honours &c. are generally given. Some gentlemen appear who are also listed (as professional men, &c.) in the commercial section. Those with second residences in the provinces usually have the country address given as well.

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Gentry in London
 (1856)
Traders and professionals in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording over 100,000 individuals.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1856)
Science Schools and Classes: Elementary Examination: Class Lists (1869)
The Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education published these class lists giving the names of all the successful candidates in the examination of science schools and classes taken in May 1869. The candidates were of three levels: honours; second stage or advanced examination; third stage or elementary examination. Twenty-three subjects were offered. These are the lists for the elementary examination. The tables, arranged subject by subject, give the candidate's full name (surname first), age, and occupation - or, in the case of those not yet of working age, father's occupation, preceded by (f.). Many candidates sat and were successful in more than one subject, and so appear in more than one list. The subjects are: I. Practical, Plane and Solid Geometry; II. Machine Construction; III. Building Construction; IV. Elementary Mathematics; V. Higher Mathematics; VI. Theoretical Mechanics; VII. Applied Mechanics; VIII. Acoustics, Light, and Heat: IX. Magnetism and Electricity; X. Inorganic Chemistry; XI. Organic Chemistry; XII. Geology; XIII. Mineralogy; XIV. Animal Physiology; XV. Zoology; XVI. Vegetable Anatomy and Physiology; XVII. Systematic and Economic Botany; XVIII. Mining; XIX. Metallurgy; XX. Navigation; XXI. Nautical Astronomy; XXII. Steam; XXIII. Physical Geography.

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Science Schools and Classes: Elementary Examination: Class Lists
 (1869)
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