Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Alisaunder Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'alisaunder'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

Buy all
Get all 8 records to view, to save and print for £34.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Inhabitants of Warwickshire (1332)
This lay subsidy roll for Warwickshire records the tax of a tenth and a fifteenth on the laity of the county at Michaelmas 1332. The record is arranged by boroughs, ancient demesnes, and hundreds, and within hundreds by township. The roll was translated and edited by William Fowler Carter and published by the Dugdale Society in 1926, with an appendix printing the lay subsidy rolls for Stratford-upon-Avon of 1309, 1313 and 1332, and a brief extract from an assize roll of 1323 inquiring about irregularities in the levying of the tax.

ALISAUNDER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Warwickshire
 (1332)
Testators and legatees in London (1258-1358)
The mediaeval Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1889. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. Sometimes there were further proceedings in the court relating to the will, such as 'It was found by a jury that the testator was of full age when he made the above testament', a statement as to where the testament had been proved, or proceedings on a challenge to the testament &c. - such additional material is added in a smaller typeface in this edition.

ALISAUNDER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Testators and legatees in London
 (1258-1358)
Hampshire and Surrey clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1396)
Ordinations as acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop William de Wykeham of Winchester. Winchester diocese covered Hampshire and Surrey; the ordinations also attracted many persons from distant dioceses bearing letters dimissory from their ordinaries, and these are duly noted in the text. Many of these clerks would not go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars are indicated ('f.' = brother). The acolyte lists usually give parish of origin or title. The sample scan is from 1404.

ALISAUNDER. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Hampshire and Surrey clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1396)
Close Rolls (1429-1435)
The close rolls of the 8th to 13th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France. Also included is the Exchange Roll of 1424 to 1434, of licences to transmit sums of money out of the realm.

ALISAUNDER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Close Rolls
 (1429-1435)
Dublin diocese testators and legatees (1457-1483)
This register of testaments or wills and inventories from the diocese of Dublin in the time of archbishops Tregury and Walton (now in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin) was printed with a translation by the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland in 1896-7. The inventory usually comes first, and often includes names of debtors and creditors to the testator. The diocese of Dublin did not extend far into the Pale; but the province of Dublin, over which the archbishops had prerogative probate jurisdiction, included the southern half of Ireland, but virtually all these wills are from the city of Dublin or close at hand.

ALISAUNDER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Dublin diocese testators and legatees
 (1457-1483)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

ALISAUNDER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire (1406-1535)
The Hospital of the Holy Cross was founded in 1269; in time this fraternity became a social and religious gild. 'The Register of the Gild of the Holy Cross, the Blessed Mary and St John the Baptist of Stratford-upon-Avon' was edited by J. Harvey Bloom, rector of Whitchurch, and printed in 1907. The register is a record of admissions to the gild, an account of the fines paid by new members, and the names of those in arrear. Each year's record usually starts on the Monday after Ascension Day (the sixth Thursday after Easter), when the new aldermen, master and proctors of the gild were elected, all duly named. Then follow the admissions to the gild, including payments for prayers and candles (lights) for the faithful dead; and the names of the sureties for these payments. Interspersed with this are occasional proclamations and memoranda concerning the fraternity. A peculiarity of this publication is that the years given at the head of each page (e. g. 1502-3) are those of the regnal year (in that case 18 Henry VII) in which the Monday after Ascension Day fell. The regnal years of Henry IV, Henry VI, Richard III and Henry VII all started after that day in the calendars of 1399, 1422, 1483 and 1485; so the gild registers during those years actually cover the following year to that shown in this printed text (in that case, 1503-4).

ALISAUNDER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire
 (1406-1535)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

ALISAUNDER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.