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Alee Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'alee'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 16 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Liegemen and traitors, diplomats and spies (1540-1542)
The Privy Council of England dealt with many delicate and important matters of state. The surviving records date back as early as the 14th century, but Henry VIII on 10 August 1540, with the advice of the council, ordered that the council should have its own clerk 'to write, entre and registre all such decrees, determinacons, lettres and other such things as he shuld be appoynted to entre in a booke, to remayne alwayes as a leger, aswell for the dischardge of the sayd counsaillours touching such things as they shuld passe from tyme to tyme, as alsoo for a memoriall unto theim of their owne procedings'. The register from that date to 8 April 1542 was transcribed for the Commissioners of the Public Records by sir Harris Nicolas, and published in 1837. Although the council often dealt with petitions from aggrieved subjects, its main function was to oversee internal and external security.

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Liegemen and traitors, diplomats and spies
 (1540-1542)
Inhabitants of Nottingham (1485-1547)
The muniments of the borough of Nottingham include extensive mediaeval archives. A selection from these from the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII was prepared and edited by W. H. Stevenson for the Corporation, and printed, with translations of the passages in Latin, in 1885. The principal sources used are the borough Court Books, largely dealing with civil cases, for which an almost complete series survives for this period; Sessions Rolls (92 survive for the two reigns), in which crimes and misdemeanours are recorded; a Mickletorn or Leet jury roll; detailed chamberlains' and bridge-wardens' accounts; and the Hall Books, or council minutes. There are lists of burgesses enrolled; bakers admitted to bake; and fines for licences to trade. A subsidy roll of 1523-4 lists householders by street, and there is an appendix of local deeds, including some material dating back to the 14th century.

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Inhabitants of Nottingham
 (1485-1547)
Freemen of London (1540-1550)
The long series of mediaeval registers and books of admission of the freemen of London was destroyed by fire in 1786. Thirty surviving charred leaves were gathered together and rebound, becoming Egerton MS 2408 in the British Museum. The order is jumbled and generally speaking none can be dated with certainty, although all belong to the very end of the reign of Henry VIII and the start of the reign of his son, Edward VI. These are pages from the admission books. Each entry here usually gives the name of the person admitted to the freedom; his father's name, address and occupation; his entitlement to the freedom, usually by having served out an apprenticeship to a citizen, naming the master and his trade. Then there may follow a cross-reference to M. or N., being two volumes of another set of official books denoted by the letters of the alphabet, and following each other in chronological sequence, which evidently gave details of entries into apprenticeships. These other books no longer exist: but the dates given for entry do identify the start of the apprenticeship, and so give by implication a date for the eventual admission to freedom. In the margin is the name of the city ward and the total of the fee and fine paid on admission.

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Freemen of London
 (1540-1550)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1547-1550)
The Privy Council of Edward VI was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1547-1550)
Officers of the Royal Household (1553)
King Edward VI died 6 July 1553 and was buried 8 August following. The accounts of the funeral expenses were prepared by sir Edward Waldegrave, knight, one of queen Mary's privy coucil, and master of her Majesty's great wardrobe. The expenses included the purchase of 'blacke clothe boughte for the buriall' to furnish mourning for every officer and servant of the late king's household, and these accounts list all the officers, department by department, by name. Most officers were provided with 4 yards of cloth, and their clerks and servants 3 yards each: greater dignitaries were allowed from 7 to 16 yards; sir Edward himself received 10. The total cost of the 9,376 and a half yards of cloth was 5946 9s 9d.

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Officers of the Royal Household
 (1553)
Tradesmen of York (1272-1558)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city.Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 19,900 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year, the year being here reckoned as starting at Michaelmas (29 September) until 1373, and thence at Candlemas (2 February). Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; and those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

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Tradesmen of York
 (1272-1558)
Penshurst Manuscripts (1150-1580)
C. L. Kingsford prepared a calendar of the papers of Lord de L'Isle and Dudley at Penshurst Place in Kent for the Historical Manuscripts Commission, of which this first volume was published in 1925. The material is presented in eleven sections: I. 39 deeds relating to the Sydney family's Surrey and Sussex estates from about 1150 to 1502; II. Summary notes on deeds from these and other English counties (mainly Essex, Kent, Lincolnshire and Yorkshire) and from Wales and Ireland; III. Documents relating to Robertsbridge Abbey in Sussex (charters and deeds; rentals; court rolls; reeve's accounts at Footland; and bursar's accounts) from 1160 onwards; IV. Deeds and documents relating to the church and college of Tattershall in Lincolnshire (deeds; statutes and ordinances; miscellaneous papers; court rolls; and accounts (warden's, steward's, precentor's and impositor's, receiver's, bailiffs', and building and post-dissolution accounts); V. Family papers and estates accounts of the Cromwells of Tattershall (general accounts and wills; accounts of stewards of the household; building accounts of Tattershall castle; estate accounts); VI. Summary lists of various rolls, rentals, surveys and accounts, from various counties (mainly Kent and Lincolnshire); VII. Documents relating to Penshurst and its owners; VIII. Sydney family papers; IX. Accounts of the ironworks at Robertsbridge and in Glamorgan; X. Papers relating to the Council of Wales, 1526 to 1580; and XI. Irish Accounts, from sir Henry Sydney's terms as Vice-Treasurer and Lord Deputy of Ireland, 1556 to 1578.

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Penshurst Manuscripts
 (1150-1580)
Carew Manuscripts (1575-1588)
One of the few detailed sources surviving for 16th-century Ireland is this compilation of government papers and correspondence made by sir George Carew.

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Carew Manuscripts
 (1575-1588)
St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1635)
Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms
 (1635)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1619-1657)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Sessions Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county.

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1619-1657)
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