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Adison Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'adison'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 15 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Calais, and visitors (1485-1543)
Richard Turpyn, a burgess of Calais, the English enclave on the French coast, compiled (or possessed) a chronicle of events there from 1485 to 1540, a copy of which survived among the Stowe manuscripts in the Harleian collection in the British Museum. This was edited for the Camden Society, together with a number of other papers relating to events in Calais in that period, by John Gough Nichols, and printed in 1846. Many of the persons named in the resulting book are knights and noblemen attending king Henry VII and king Henry VIII when on the Continent on diplomatic or marital business; but there is also a muster roll of the garrison of Calais of 1533 (136-139).

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Inhabitants of Calais, and visitors
 (1485-1543)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1569-1578)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1569 to June 1578, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by John Hill Burton, Historiographer Royal for Scotland, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1878. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1569-1578)
Traders in Canterbury (1392-1592)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, transcribed and privately printed in 1904 the lists of the Intrantes - those persons, not being free of the city, who paid the annual fine to trade - for the period 1392 to 1592. The names are arranged by ward (Burgate, Newyngate, Westgate, Worgate and Northgate, and give full name, (sometimes) occupation, and fee paid.

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Traders in Canterbury
 (1392-1592)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
Astrologer's Clients (1644-1645)
William Lilly, an astrologer, kept practice books listing his clients, their questions and the figures or horoscopes that he cast. Their questions relate to stolen property, probable success in any undertaking, ships at sea, health, long-life, love, marriage, pregnancy, &c. The books came into the possession of Elias Ashmole, who bequeathed them to Oxford University. This calendar was prepared by William Henry Black and printed in 1845. He lists the clients by folio number, remarking 'the names are often omitted, and usually written invertedly, or disguised in some other manner'. Where a date of birth is specified in the practice book, it is given in the calendar. Practice Book I is for consultations from 30 March 1644 to 4 June 1645.

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Astrologer's Clients
 (1644-1645)
Inhabitants of Manchester, and travellers (1633-1666)
The constables' accounts of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire from 1633 to 1647 were edited by J. P. Earwaker and published in 1892. The accounts largely consist of details of disbursements by the constables, and as such include payments to paupers and soldiers with passes to help them on their journeys to and from other parts of the country. Earwaker added nine 'important appendices' to the work: 1. Disbursements and Receipts during the Plague of Manchester, 1605-6 and 1606 (from State Papers Domestic in the Public Record Office); 2. List of the Books of Assessment, Charity Money Accounts, &c., now in the Possession of the Corporation; 3. List of the Inhabitants of Manchester in 1648 (pages 181 to 201); 4. List of the Inhabitants of Manchester in 1651 (202-221); 5. Disbursements of the Constables in 1651-2; 6. List of the Inhabitants of Manchester assessed in 1659 (225-246); 7. A Second List of the Inhabitants of Manchester in 1659 (247-260); 8. List of the Inhabitants of Manchester assessed in 1666 (261-283); and 9. List of Uncommon, Obsolete, and Dialect Words to be found in the Preceding Pages.

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Inhabitants of Manchester, and travellers
 (1633-1666)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1679-1687)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1679-1687)
Citizens of London: Goldsmiths (1724)
A list of the persons who polled for Charles Goodfellow esquire at the late election for a member of parliament to represent the city of London, held 23rd to 28th November 1724. Full names are given, surname first, arranged by the livery companies to which the citizens belonged. This list was published in The Daily Post and elsewhere: 'Gentlemen, we desire you will carefully examine the following list of polsters, and in case you find yourselves or friends polled by others, or any polled who are dead or absent, or who have no right, that you'll give immediate notice thereof at Salter's Hall in Swithin's Lane, where attendance will be daily given from 8 a-clock in the morning till 9 a-clock at night. It is not doubted but the endeavours to obtain a law to secure your invaded rights and privileges will be soon successful, this should now excite you to a diligent search after false pollers, which will in all probability make the majority greater for sir Richard Hopkins. N.B. The scrutineers so far as they have proceeded, do find a much greater number of false pollers for Mr Goodfellow, than for sir Richard Hopkins.'

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Citizens of London: Goldsmiths
 (1724)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered in Northumberland (1728-1731)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Masters of Apprentices registered in Northumberland
 (1728-1731)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Scotland (1755)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Liverpool return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/52

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Apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1755)
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