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Addy Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'addy'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 148 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Skyrack wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Bingley and Otley.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Skyrack wapentake
 (1379)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Staincross wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Penistone and Barnsley.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Staincross wapentake
 (1379)
Landowners and tenants in Yorkshire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

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Landowners and tenants in Yorkshire
 (1345-1485)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Official Papers (1603-1610)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Scotland, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1603-1610)
Wills proved at York: Names of Testators (1627-1637)
The diocese of York comprised most of Yorkshire, and Nottinghamshire: the York Exchequer court was the ordinary probate jurisdiction for the Yorkshire part of the diocese, but some wills from Nottinghamshire and other parts of the province of York were also proved there. Dr Francis Collins compiled this index to the transcribed wills of the Prerogative and Exchequer Courts in the York registry proved from 1627 to 1637. The date on the left is that of probate; the testator's full name is then given (surname first), parish or place of abode, and sometimes occupation, and date that the will was executed; and volume and folio number where it the transcript commences. The Act Books were used by Dr Collins to supply deficiencies in the information from the transcripts.

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Wills proved at York: Names of Testators
 (1627-1637)
Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham (1626-1638)
Sexual and religious behaviour, marriage and probate were under the purview of the ecclesiastical courts in England at this period, exercised through the individual dioceses and archdeaconries. The diocese of Durham included the whole of county Durham, Northumberland (except for Hexhamshire) and Alston in Cumberland. The High Commission Court dealt with cases from the whole diocese, and a book of court acts from 1628 to 1639, and another of depositions from 1626 to 1638, survived in the dean and chapter library, were edited by W. Hylton Dyer Longstaffe, and published by the Surtees Society in 1858. This is not a complete abstract of the record: there are hundreds of cases for contempt of the ordinary jurisdiction, of which only a few were selected as examples 'in consequence of the rank of the persons proceeded against or other contents of interest'. However, all cases in which the nature of the offence occurs are traced from start to finish, but omitting much of the proceedings in between. The names and ages of all the deponents are recorded.

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Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham
 (1626-1638)
Southwell Peculiar Baptisms, Marriages and Burials (1614-1641)
Each year a copy of the previous year's register of baptisms, marriages and burials, attested by the incumbent and churchwardens, was returned to the diocesan authorities. The peculiar of Southwell in Nottinghamshire was ordinarily exempt from episcopal jurisdiction in such matters, and the 24 parishes in the peculiar made similar returns to the Southwell registry. A few of these survive from this period, and they were transcribed by T. N. Blagg and printed as the first volume of the Record Series of the Thoroton Society in 1903. The returns are for Beckingham 1634, 1637, 1641; Bleasby 1633; Blidworth 1638; Calverton 1617, 1623; *Caunton 1614, 1619, 1628, 1641; Cropwell Bishop 1638, 164; Darlton 1622, 1633, 1641; *Dunham 1641; Edingley 1638; Farnsfield 1623; Halam 1622, 1637; Halloughton 1622, 1637; *Holme 1623, 1625, 1627, 1638, 1641; Kirklington 1622, 1638; *Morton 1622, 1623; *North Muskham 1623, 1633, 1638; South Muskham 1623; *Norwell 1638, 1641; Oxton 1622; *Ragnall 1623; Southwell 1633, 1640; Tithby (cum Cropwell Butler) 1625; Upton 1633, 1638; and Woodborough 1623, 1627, 1637, 1638 and 1640. Parishes marked with an asterisk (*) are those for which the original registers were missing for the period covered by the transcripts.

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Southwell Peculiar Baptisms, Marriages and Burials
 (1614-1641)
Royalist delinquents in county Durham and Northumberland, their successors, tenants, debtors and creditors (1648-1660)
King Charles I was executed 30 January 1649, the kingship was abolished and government by a Council of State was established 14 February 1649. Oliver Cromwell became Lord Protector 16 December 1653; died 3 September 1658; and was succeeded by his son Richard, who abdicated 24 May 1659. Charles II was established on the throne 29 May 1660. From 1648 to 1660 parliament sequestrated royalists' estates, restoring many by a process of heavy fines called compounding; this was administered by the Committee for Compounding, working through county committees. These raised considerable amounts of money, money which was vitally necessary for maintaining the parliamentary army's campaigns to subdue opposition in the three kingdoms - England, Scotland and Ireland. The raising and delivery of these monies was the responsibility of the Committee for Advance of Money (C. A. M.). The records of these committees were detailed and extensive, amounting to about 300 volumes, and were calendared for the Public Record Office by Mary Anne Everett Green. Abstracts of the county Durham and Northumberland entries were collated by Richard Welford with a manuscript transcript of the proceedings of the parliamentary commissioners in county Durham surviving in Durham cathedral library, and published by the Surtees Society in 1905. The persons named in these abstracts are not only the delinquents themselves, and those who succeeded them in their estates, but tenants, debtors and creditors, and local constables and officials of the committees.

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Royalist delinquents in county Durham and Northumberland, their successors, tenants, debtors and creditors
 (1648-1660)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage. This index also includes marriage licence allegations for the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, 1558 to 1699.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1679)
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