Sources 1940-1949

Boys entering Truro School (1901-1954)

Truro College was founded 19 January 1880; the name was changed to Truro School in 1931. In 1954 this register of old boys was published, arranged alphabetically by surname and then christian name (or initials), in bold; then years of entering and leaving the school, and, in many cases, address as in 1954. Sometimes occupation is given.
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British Civil Servants (1940-1940)

The British Imperial Calendar lists civil servants in Britain, arranged according to the organizational structure of the state, and shows their qualifications and salaries.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1940-1940)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1940, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1940-1940)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1940-1940)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1940-1940)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1940-1940)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Graduates of the University of Ireland (1940-1940)

The University of Ireland was established by royal charter in 1908, with three constituent colleges - University College, Dublin; University College, Cork; and University College, Galway. The university calendar for 1940 lists all graduates then living: this list gives full name, surname first (sometimes with an Irish equivalent, and with maiden surname in the case of married women); and then a list of degrees in chronological order, with year of graduation.
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Residents of Portslade and Southern Cross (1940-1940)

Kelly's Directory of Brighton, Hove, Portslade and Neighbourhood for 1940 includes this list of Private Residents of Portslade and Southern Cross (S. C.).
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University of Ireland Members of Convocation (1940-1940)

The University of Ireland was established by royal charter in 1908, with three constituent colleges - University College, Dublin; University College, Cork; and University College, Galway. The university calendar for 1940 includes this complete list of Members of Convocation. It is similar to the general list of graduates of the university, but not exactly the same, for it includes academic staff of the university not necessarily graduates of the same, and not all graduates registered for membership of convocation. The list gives full names (surname first), degree and year of graduation, and, importantly, full address as in 1940 - information not given in the general list. Where the current full address was not known, the last known address was given, the entry being in italics.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1940-1940)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
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Boys entering Denstone College (1940-1940)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1940-1940)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1940-1940)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Imperial Service Medal (1940-1940)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1941-1941)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1941, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Marlborough College (1941-1941)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1941-1941)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1941-1941)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1941-1941)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1941-1941)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Denstone College (1941-1941)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career.
>> Search this source

Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1941-1941)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1941-1941)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Imperial Service Medal (1941-1941)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1942-1942)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1942, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Marlborough College (1942-1942)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952 - except, of course, in these last few years of the register, when the boys were still at school, or had left only recently.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1942-1942)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1942-1942)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
>> Search this source

Boys entering Aldenham School (1942-1942)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1942-1942)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Denstone College (1942-1942)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1942-1942)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1942-1942)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Imperial Service Medal (1942-1942)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Epsom College (1943-1943)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1943, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1943-1943)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952 - except, of course, in these last few years of the register, when the boys were still at school, or had left only recently.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1943-1943)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1943-1943)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1943-1943)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1943-1943)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Denstone College (1943-1943)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career.
>> Search this source

Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1943-1943)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1943-1943)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
>> Search this source

Imperial Service Medal (1943-1943)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Epsom College (1944-1944)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1944, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Marlborough College (1944-1944)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952 - except, of course, in these last few years of the register, when the boys were still at school, or had left only recently.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sherborne School (1944-1944)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1944-1944)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
>> Search this source

Boys entering Aldenham School (1944-1944)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1944-1944)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Denstone College (1944-1944)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career.
>> Search this source

Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1944-1944)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1944-1944)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
>> Search this source

Imperial Service Medal (1944-1944)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Epsom College (1945-1945)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1945, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage, but from 1945 onwards their intended occupations are also given, in brackets.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Marlborough College (1945-1945)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952 - except, of course, in these last few years of the register, when the boys were still at school, or had left only recently.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sherborne School (1945-1945)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1945-1945)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1945-1945)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1945-1945)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
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Boys entering Denstone College (1945-1945)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1945-1945)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1945-1945)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Imperial Service Medal (1945-1945)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1946-1946)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1946, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage, but from 1945 onwards their intended occupations are also given, in brackets.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1946-1946)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952 - except, of course, in these last few years of the register, when the boys were still at school, or had left only recently.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1946-1946)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1946-1946)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1946-1946)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1946-1946)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
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Boys entering Denstone College (1946-1946)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1946-1946)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1946-1946)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Imperial Service Medal (1946-1946)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: African Colonial Forces: 2nd Lieutenants (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Captains (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: Carribean Section: 2nd Lieutenants (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: Egypt Section: 2nd Lieutenants (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Inspectors of Permanent Communications (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Lieutenants (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: Majors (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: Palestine Section: 2nd Lieutenants (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Quarter-Masters (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: Technical Maintenance Officers (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
>> Search this source

Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: Inspectors of Permanent Communications (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
>> Search this source

Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: 2nd Lieutenants (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
>> Search this source

Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: Lieutenants (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
>> Search this source

Royal Corps of Signals: Regular Army Emergency Commissions: Quarter-Masters (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Retired Officers Temporarily Re-Employed (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Supplementary Reserve Category B: Unemployed (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Supplementary Reserve Category B (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
>> Search this source

Royal Corps of Signals: Technical Maintenance Officers (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Territorial Army (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Royal Corps of Signals: Territorial Army Unemployed List (1946-1946)

The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1947-1947)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1947, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage, but from 1945 onwards their intended occupations are also given, in brackets.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1947-1947)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952 - except, of course, in these last few years of the register, when the boys were still at school, or had left only recently.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1947-1947)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1947-1947)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1947-1947)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Associate Members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (A. M. I. Mech. E.) (1947-1947)

The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, founded in 1847, was incorporated by royal charter in 1930. The list of members of 1 March 1947 gives the names (surname first) and addresses of the seven classes of member - Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Mech. E.); Members (M. I. Mech. E.); Associate Members (A. M. I. Mech. E.); Companions (C. I. Mech. E.); Associates (A. I. Mech. E.); Graduates (G. I. Mech. E.); and Students (S. I. Mech. E.). The year of attaining qualification is given in the left-hand margin; in the higher grades the years of achieving the lower grades are also given, bracketed together. The crossed swords symbol indicates naval or military service during the Great War of 1914-1918; an italic b shows a member of the Benevolent Fund. (p) after a Graduate's or a Student's name indicates one who had passed the whole of the A. M. Examination or its recognized equivalent.
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Associates of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (A. I. Mech. E.) (1947-1947)

The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, founded in 1847, was incorporated by royal charter in 1930. The list of members of 1 March 1947 gives the names (surname first) and addresses of the seven classes of member - Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Mech. E.); Members (M. I. Mech. E.); Associate Members (A. M. I. Mech. E.); Companions (C. I. Mech. E.); Associates (A. I. Mech. E.); Graduates (G. I. Mech. E.); and Students (S. I. Mech. E.). The year of attaining qualification is given in the left-hand margin; in the higher grades the years of achieving the lower grades are also given, bracketed together. The crossed swords symbol indicates naval or military service during the Great War of 1914-1918; an italic b shows a member of the Benevolent Fund. (p) after a Graduate's or a Student's name indicates one who had passed the whole of the A. M. Examination or its recognized equivalent.
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Companions of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (C. I. Mech. E.) (1947-1947)

The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, founded in 1847, was incorporated by royal charter in 1930. The list of members of 1 March 1947 gives the names (surname first) and addresses of the seven classes of member - Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Mech. E.); Members (M. I. Mech. E.); Associate Members (A. M. I. Mech. E.); Companions (C. I. Mech. E.); Associates (A. I. Mech. E.); Graduates (G. I. Mech. E.); and Students (S. I. Mech. E.). The year of attaining qualification is given in the left-hand margin; in the higher grades the years of achieving the lower grades are also given, bracketed together. The crossed swords symbol indicates naval or military service during the Great War of 1914-1918; an italic b shows a member of the Benevolent Fund. (p) after a Graduate's or a Student's name indicates one who had passed the whole of the A. M. Examination or its recognized equivalent.
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Graduates of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (G. I. Mech. E.) (1947-1947)

The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, founded in 1847, was incorporated by royal charter in 1930. The list of members of 1 March 1947 gives the names (surname first) and addresses of the seven classes of member - Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Mech. E.); Members (M. I. Mech. E.); Associate Members (A. M. I. Mech. E.); Companions (C. I. Mech. E.); Associates (A. I. Mech. E.); Graduates (G. I. Mech. E.); and Students (S. I. Mech. E.). The year of attaining qualification is given in the left-hand margin; in the higher grades the years of achieving the lower grades are also given, bracketed together. The crossed swords symbol indicates naval or military service during the Great War of 1914-1918; an italic b shows a member of the Benevolent Fund. (p) after a Graduate's or a Student's name indicates one who had passed the whole of the A. M. Examination or its recognized equivalent.
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Members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (M. I. Mech. E.) (1947-1947)

The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, founded in 1847, was incorporated by royal charter in 1930. The list of members of 1 March 1947 gives the names (surname first) and addresses of the seven classes of member - Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Mech. E.); Members (M. I. Mech. E.); Associate Members (A. M. I. Mech. E.); Companions (C. I. Mech. E.); Associates (A. I. Mech. E.); Graduates (G. I. Mech. E.); and Students (S. I. Mech. E.). The year of attaining qualification is given in the left-hand margin; in the higher grades the years of achieving the lower grades are also given, bracketed together. The crossed swords symbol indicates naval or military service during the Great War of 1914-1918; an italic b shows a member of the Benevolent Fund. (p) after a Graduate's or a Student's name indicates one who had passed the whole of the A. M. Examination or its recognized equivalent.
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Students of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (S. I. Mech. E.) (1947-1947)

The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, founded in 1847, was incorporated by royal charter in 1930. The list of members of 1 March 1947 gives the names (surname first) and addresses of the seven classes of member - Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Mech. E.); Members (M. I. Mech. E.); Associate Members (A. M. I. Mech. E.); Companions (C. I. Mech. E.); Associates (A. I. Mech. E.); Graduates (G. I. Mech. E.); and Students (S. I. Mech. E.). The year of attaining qualification is given in the left-hand margin; in the higher grades the years of achieving the lower grades are also given, bracketed together. The crossed swords symbol indicates naval or military service during the Great War of 1914-1918; an italic b shows a member of the Benevolent Fund. (p) after a Graduate's or a Student's name indicates one who had passed the whole of the A. M. Examination or its recognized equivalent.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1947-1947)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
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Boys entering Denstone College (1947-1947)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1947-1947)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known. Of course, these boys who entered the school in the years immediately running up to 1956 were either still at school, or certainly had their careers ahead of them, and so their records in the register are more or less confined to name, birthdate, parentage, school house, and home address.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1947-1947)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Imperial Service Medal (1947-1947)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
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Doctors trained in Britain or Ireland but living abroad (1948-1948)

The Medical Directory was split into several sections. The Practitioners Resident Abroad section covered all medical practitioners who, having qualified in Britain or Ireland, were living abroad. Each year a schedule was sent to each doctor to be returned to the publishers, so as to keep the directory up to date. In the directory the doctor's name is given first, in bold, surname first, in capitals; then current address. Next are the qualifications; the italic abbreviations in parentheses following the qualifications indicate the medical school at which they were gained. Then there is a list of posts and honours within the profession, starting with those then current; previous posts are preceded by the word 'late'. Finally, brief details are given of any publications. Inclusion of names in the list did not imply a right to practise in the country of residence.
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Doctors in Ireland (1948-1948)

The Medical Directory was split into several sections. This section covered all medical practitioners resident in (the whole of) Ireland. Each year a schedule was sent to each doctor to be returned to the publishers, so as to keep the directory up to date. In the directory the doctor's name is given first, in bold, surname first, in capitals; then current address. Next are the qualifications; the italic abbreviations in parentheses following the qualifications indicate the medical school at which they were gained. Then there is a list of posts and honours within the profession, starting with those then current; previous posts are preceded by the word 'late'. Finally, brief details are given of any publications.
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Doctors in London (1948-1948)

The Medical Directory was split into several sections. The London section covered all medical practitioners resident within the London postal district. Each year a schedule was sent to each doctor to be returned to the publishers, so as to keep the directory up to date. In the directory the doctor's name is given first, in bold, surname first, in capitals; then current address. Next are the qualifications; the italic abbreviations in parentheses following the qualifications indicate the medical school at which they were gained. Then there is a list of posts and honours within the profession, starting with those then current; previous posts are preceded by the word 'late'. Finally, brief details are given of any publications.
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Doctors in Military Service (1948-1948)

The Medical Directory was split into several sections. This section covered medical practitioners in the Navy, the Army, the Indian Army and the Royal Air Force. The doctor's name is given first, in bold, surname first, in capitals; then current address. Next are the qualifications; the italic abbreviations in parentheses following the qualifications indicate the medical school at which they were gained. Then there is a list of posts and honours within the profession, starting with those then current; previous posts are preceded by the word 'late'. Finally, brief details are given of any publications.
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Doctors in Scotland (1948-1948)

The Medical Directory was split into several sections. This section covered all medical practitioners resident in Scotland. Each year a schedule was sent to each doctor to be returned to the publishers, so as to keep the directory up to date. In the directory the doctor's name is given first, in bold, surname first, in capitals; then current address. Next are the qualifications; the italic abbreviations in parentheses following the qualifications indicate the medical school at which they were gained. Then there is a list of posts and honours within the profession, starting with those then current; previous posts are preceded by the word 'late'. Finally, brief details are given of any publications.
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Foreign doctors in Britain (1948-1948)

This Medical Directory appendix lists medical practitioners temporarily registered in Great Britain under Defence Regulation 32B. The list gives no more than full name (surname first), and qualification (with place and date).
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Secretaries of National Health Insurance Committees (1948-1948)

This appendix to the Medical Directory lists honorary secretaries of National Healh Insurance local medical and panel committees in each of the English, Scottish and Welsh counties and county boroughs, and for Belfast and the six counties of Northern Ireland.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1948-1948)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1948, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage, but from 1945 onwards their intended occupations are also given, in brackets.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1948-1948)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952 - except, of course, in these last few years of the register, when the boys were still at school, or had left only recently.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1948-1948)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1948-1948)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1948-1948)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1948-1948)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
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Boys entering Denstone College (1948-1948)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career. For the last few years before 1952 many of the boys were still at school or only recently left, and for these the information is necessarily confined to little more than full name, current address, and school house.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1948-1948)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known. Of course, these boys who entered the school in the years immediately running up to 1956 were either still at school, or certainly had their careers ahead of them, and so their records in the register are more or less confined to name, birthdate, parentage, school house, and home address.
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Shipping and Forwarding Agents: Bristol (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents: Honorary Members (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Shipping and Forwarding Agents: Humber (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Shipping and Forwarding Agents: Liverpool and District (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Shipping and Forwarding Agents: London (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Shipping and Forwarding Agents: Manchester and District (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Shipping and Forwarding Agents: Non-Practising (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Overseas Shipping and Forwarding Agents (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Scottish Shipping and Forwarding Agents (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Shipping and Forwarding Agents: Southampton and District (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and a list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Shipping and Forwarding Agents: Students (1948-1948)

The Institute of Shipping and Forwarding Agents was incorporated under licence by the Board of Trade 19 December 1944. This third edition of the List of Members gives surnames, initials, and company address of practising members, and date of becoming Associate (A) or Fellow (F), arranged by the eight geographical branches - Bristol Channel; Humber District; Liverpool and District; London; Manchester and District; Scottish; Southampton and District; and Overseas. In addition, there are similar lists of Honorary Members and Non-Practising Members; and this list of 109 Student Members (those marked with an asterisk having passed the institute's examination).
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1948-1948)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Imperial Service Medal (1948-1948)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1949-1949)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the year 1949, when Henry William Fernehough Franklin was headmaster. Of course, the future of most boys entering in this year was still to unfold by 1955, and so their details are just those of year of birth and parentage, but from 1945 onwards their intended occupations are also given, in brackets.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1949-1949)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952 - except, of course, in these last few years of the register, when the boys were still at school, or had left only recently.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1949-1949)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1949-1949)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1949-1949)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1949-1949)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known. Of course, for the boys from 1940 onwards, their career was ahead of them at the time of compilation, and the entries are more basic.
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Boys entering Denstone College (1949-1949)

Volume 2 of the Denstone Register, listing boys entering Denstone College, the public school near Uttoxeter, from 1931 to 1952, was edited by E. T. Greenwood and published in 1957. The bulk of the information was obtained by enquiry with the Old Denstonians themselves, though not all could be contacted. Each item sets out, so far as could be ascertained: full name (in capitals, surname first); current address (as of 1957); school house; school record; and summary of career. For the last few years before 1952 many of the boys were still at school or only recently left, and for these the information is necessarily confined to little more than full name, current address, and school house.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1949-1949)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known. Of course, these boys who entered the school in the years immediately running up to 1956 were either still at school, or certainly had their careers ahead of them, and so their records in the register are more or less confined to name, birthdate, parentage, school house, and home address.
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Associate Members of the Institution of Mining Engineers (Assoc. M. I. Min. E.) (1949-1949)

The Institution of Mining Engineers was established 1 July 1889 and incorporated by royal charter 9 February 1915. This list of members is corrected up to 28 December 1949. Five grades of members are listed: Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Min. E.); Members (M. I. Min. E.); Associate Members (Assoc. M. I. Min. E.); Students (Stud. I. Min. E.); and Associates (Assoc. I. Min. E.). The grade of Associate Member comprised all persons who were registered as associate members on 31 January 1933: every candidate for admission to that class after that date must be a person at least 23 years of age who either must be 'engaged in pursuits of a character which in the opinion of the Council are likely to lead up to qualification as a Member'; or who 'by his position and attainments, has contributed to the advancement of the science or practice of mining engineering'. The members' names are listed alphabetically (in bold) by surname and christian name, with full address. On the right hand side are initials indicating to which federated institute he or she belonged: M. C., Midland Counties Institution of Engineers; M. G., Manchester Geological and Mining Society; M. I., Midland Institute of Mining Engineers; N. E., North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers; N. S., North Staffordshire Institute of Mining Engineers; S. S., South Staffordshire and Warwickshire Institute of Mining Engineers; and S. W., the South Western Society of Mining Engineers.
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Associates of the Institution of Mining Engineers (Assoc. I. Min. E.) (1949-1949)

The Institution of Mining Engineers was established 1 July 1889 and incorporated by royal charter 9 February 1915. This list of members is corrected up to 28 December 1949. Five grades of members are listed: Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Min. E.); Members (M. I. Min. E.); Associate Members (Assoc. M. I. Min. E.); Students (Stud. I. Min. E.); and Associates (Assoc. I. Min. E.). The grade of Associate comprised all persons who were registered as associates on 31 January 1933: every candidate for admission to that class after that date must be a person at least 25 years of age 'who desires to promote the science or practice of mining and holds a position which in the opinion of the Council renders him eligible for Associateship, but not for corporate membership of the Institution'. The members' names are listed alphabetically (in bold) by surname and christian name, with full address. On the right hand side are initials indicating to which federated institute he or she belonged: M. C., Midland Counties Institution of Engineers; M. G., Manchester Geological and Mining Society; M. I., Midland Institute of Mining Engineers; N. E., North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers; N. S., North Staffordshire Institute of Mining Engineers; S. S., South Staffordshire and Warwickshire Institute of Mining Engineers; and S. W., the South Western Society of Mining Engineers.
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Members of the Institution of Mining Engineers (M. I. Min. E.) (1949-1949)

The Institution of Mining Engineers was established 1 July 1889 and incorporated by royal charter 9 February 1915. This list of members is corrected up to 28 December 1949. Five grades of members are listed: Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Min. E.); Members (M. I. Min. E.); Associate Members (Assoc. M. I. Min. E.); Students (Stud. I. Min. E.); and Associates (Assoc. I. Min. E.). The grade of Member comprised all persons who were registered as associates on 31 January 1933: every candidate for admission to that class after that date must be a person at least 30 years of age who 'shall have been so educated and trained as to be in the opinion of the Council a fully qualified Mining Engineer' and have acted for at least five years as a qualified colliery manager, &c.; or 'he shall be a person whose position and attainments in Science or Technology justify, in the opinion of the Council, his election as a Member'. The members' names are listed alphabetically (in bold) by surname and christian name, with full address. On the right hand side are initials indicating to which federated institute he or she belonged: M. C., Midland Counties Institution of Engineers; M. G., Manchester Geological and Mining Society; M. I., Midland Institute of Mining Engineers; N. E., North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers; N. S., North Staffordshire Institute of Mining Engineers; S. S., South Staffordshire and Warwickshire Institute of Mining Engineers; and S. W., the South Western Society of Mining Engineers.
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Student Mining Engineers (Stud. I. Min. E.) (1949-1949)

The Institution of Mining Engineers was established 1 July 1889 and incorporated by royal charter 9 February 1915. This list of members is corrected up to 28 December 1949. Five grades of members are listed: Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Min. E.); Members (M. I. Min. E.); Associate Members (Assoc. M. I. Min. E.); Students (Stud. I. Min. E.); and Associates (Assoc. I. Min. E.). The grade of Associate comprised all persons who were registered as associates on 31 January 1933: every candidate for admission to that class after that date must be a person 'who is qualifying himself for the profession of mining engineering'. The members' names are listed alphabetically (in bold) by surname and christian name, with full address. On the right hand side are initials indicating to which federated institute he or she belonged: M. C., Midland Counties Institution of Engineers; M. G., Manchester Geological and Mining Society; M. I., Midland Institute of Mining Engineers; N. E., North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers; N. S., North Staffordshire Institute of Mining Engineers; S. S., South Staffordshire and Warwickshire Institute of Mining Engineers; and S. W., the South Western Society of Mining Engineers.
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Prominent Inhabitants of Birmingham (1949-1949)

The Birmingham Post Year Book and Who's Who is an annual publication seeking to give comprehensive information about the city's organizations and its eminent residents. The Year Book has separate sections dealing with the City Council; the Municipal Elections; Municipal Departments; The High Court of Justice; Members of Parliament for the City; Political Associations; Government Departments; Trade and Industry; Birmingham Consular Association; Banks and Branches; Birmingham Stock Exchange; Restaurants and Cafes; Health; Churches and Religious Congregations; Freemasons; Education; Child Care; Youth; Cultural Activities; British Broadcasting Corporation; Sports and Pastimes; Philanthropic and Kindred Institutions; County and Kindred Societies; International Societies; United Nations Association; Clubs; Transport; The Forces; Toc H.; Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes; Electricity and Gas Boards; Law List; Chartered Accountants; Incorporated Accountants; Certified and Corporate Accountants; Chartered Secretaries; Surveyors, Auctioneers, Land Agents and Valuers; Architects; Civil Engineers; Mechanical Engineers; Electrical Engineers; and Old Boys' Associations. For most organizations, names and addresses of secretaries and other officers are given. Full lists of professional people are given in their sections, with addresses. Then there is the Who's Who in Birmingham, which (with an In Memoriam section for those who had died in the last year) usually gives full name (surname first, in capitals, in bold), date and place of birth (and often father's name), if married the year and name of spouse (and sometimes father's name); numbers of sons and daughters; a brief description of career, recreations, and current address.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1949-1949)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Imperial Service Medal (1949-1949)

The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.
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