Sources 1910-1919

Boys at University College School (1901-1931)

In 1830 a school was set up adjoining the University and College of London on Gower Street; the school was enlarged from 1860 to 1876, and then removed to Frognal in 1907. In 1931 this register was published, listing all boys entering the school from Christmas term of 1859 to the summer entrants of 1931. The dates are abbreviated (98-01 = 1898-1901, &c.), each session being reckoned as beginning in September of one year and ending in the July of the next; the date of joining the school is indicated by the former, although it may fall in the latter, but the date of leaving by the latter, although it may fall in the former. Thus, if a boy came at any time during the Session 1863-64 and left any time during 1868-69, his date would be given 1863-69. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname, and then chronologically under each surname, full name being given where known. An asterisk * indicates that that particular boy lost his life in the Great War: in these cases, rank and regiment have been given where possible. Addresses as of 1931 are given where known. Italics in christian names or initials indicate that that particular boy was known, in 1931, to be dead. (a) (b) &c placed before christian names indicates brothers. In some cases occupation in later life is shown (A, artist; B, barrister; C A, chartered accountant; Ch, chemist; E, engineer; H C S, home civil service; I C S, Indian civil service; Med, physician or surgeon; M S E, member of the Stock Exchange; Mus, musician; Rev, minister of religion; S, solicitor). This is the index to those boys who were at the school in the period 1901 to 1931.
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Boys entering Truro School (1901-1954)

Truro College was founded 19 January 1880; the name was changed to Truro School in 1931. In 1954 this register of old boys was published, arranged alphabetically by surname and then christian name (or initials), in bold; then years of entering and leaving the school, and, in many cases, address as in 1954. Sometimes occupation is given.
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London Metropolitan Police (1902-1911)

The London Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/337) lists policemen joining the force 14 July 1902 to 10 April 1911 (warrant numbers 88812 to 100006). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letters of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. The information about removal is sometimes wanting. A final column of 'Remarks' is largely blank, but occasionally gives an alias or a cross-reference to another warrant number. The register is discoloured and damaged in places, and one or two pages are missing.
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Leeds University B. A. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University LL. B. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University M. A. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Civil Engineering (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Coal Mining (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Commerce (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Dental Surgery (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Dyeing (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Education (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Electrical Engineering (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Leather Manufacture (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Mechanical Engineering (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Public Health (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma for Teachers of French (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma for Teachers of German (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Diploma in Textile Industries (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates and diplomates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Honours in Botany (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Chemistry (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Chemistry of Leather Manufacture (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Classics (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Colour Chemistry and Dyeing (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Electrical Engineering (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Engineering (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in English Language and Literature (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Geology (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honorary Graduates (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes this list of honorary degrees granted from 1905 to 1910 - Doctor of Laws, Doctor of Letters, Doctor of Science, and Master of Arts. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in History (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Mathematics (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in M. B. and Ch. B. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Mining (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Modern Languages and Literature (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Philosophy (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Physics (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University Honours in Physiology (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of honours gained in each subject for 1905 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first, with year and class of examination.
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Leeds University B. Med. and B. Surg. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University Doctors of Medicine (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University M. Surg. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University B. Sc. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University D. Sc. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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Leeds University M. Sc. (1905-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of graduates. Full names are given, surname first, with year of graduation.
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B. A. Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The B. A. examinations comprised those for B. A. with Honours (Classics, English Language and Literature, Modern Languages and Literature, and History), Ordinary B. A., and the Ordinary B. A. Intermediate Examination. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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M. A. Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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B. Sc. Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first. The B. Sc. lists comprise the examination for B. Sc. with Honours (Physics, Chemistry, Botany, Geology, Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Colour Chemistry and Dyeing, Chemistry of Leather Manufacture), Ordinary B. Sc. Final Examination, and B. Sc. Intermediate Examination.
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Ch. M. Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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Technology Diploma Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first. The diplomas, issued by the Faculties of Science and Technology, are in Coal Mining, Leather Manufacture, Dyeing, and Textile Industries.
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Diploma in Commerce Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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Diploma in Dental Surgery Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first. The lists cover the Preliminary Examination in Science, the First Professional Examination, and the Final Examination.
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Diploma in Education Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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Diploma in Public Health Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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Diploma for Teachers of French Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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Diploma for Teachers of German Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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D. Sc. Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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LL. B. Final Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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M. B. and Ch. B. Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first. The lists comprise the Final M. B. and Ch. B. with Honours; Final M. B. and Ch. B.; Second M. B. and Ch. B.; and First M. B. and Ch. B.
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M. D. Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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M. Sc. Examination Lists, Leeds University (1909-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes examination lists for the period September 1909 to June 1910. The students' full names are given, surname first.
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Inhabitants of Adlington near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Alderley Edge near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Bollington near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Bosley near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Bramhall near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Birtles near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Butley near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Capesthorne near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Chelford near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Congleton near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Eaton near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Fallibroome near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Gawsworth near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Henbury near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Hurdsfield near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Langley near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Lower Withington near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Lyme Handley near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory. (j) indicates journeyman.
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Inhabitants of Marton near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Macclesfield Forest in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Nether Alderley near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of North Rode near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Over Alderley near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Old Withington near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Pott Shrigley near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Poynton near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Prestbury near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Rainow near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Siddington near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Sutton near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Tytherington near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Upton near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Wildboarclough near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Wilmslow near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Inhabitants of Wincle near Macclesfield in Cheshire (1910-1910)

Alphabetical list of inhabitants from Seed's Macclesfield and District Directory.
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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1910-1910)

The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This appendix to the list was issued in 1910.
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Civil Servants and Office Holders (1910-1910)

The Imperial Calendar gives lists of officials and office-holders throughout England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland
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Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire (1910-1910)

Wellington College, near Wokingham, was originally founded for the education of sons of military officers. A register of boys entering the school from First Term 1859 to Michaelmas 1933 was compiled by F. G. Lawrence for the Old Wellingtonian Society. In each entry the boy's name is given in full, in bold, surname first; age at entry (usually 11 to 14); then, in brackets, the name of the dormitory or house to which he belonged, in italics, with the years of his stay; then his father's name (usually surname and initials, but not christian name) with military decorations where appropriate. School prefects and captains are noted as such; if the boy played cricket for the school, XI with the years; academic honours, scholarships, &c.; a brief biography; and date of death, or (where known) address in 1933. Year of marriage is given, and sometimes the wife's name and/or her father's name. Clearly, those boys who kept contact with the school and/or had distinguished military careers have detailed entries; others disappeared into oblivion on leaving.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1910-1910)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1895 to 1927 there was a junior school, called Lower School (L. S.), taking in boys from the age of 8, many passing seamlessly into the main school at age 12 to 14. This is the index to the year 1910, when the Reverend Thomas Northmore Hart-Smith was headmaster.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1910-1910)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1910-1910)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Loretto School (1910-1910)

The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1910-1910)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Fettes College, Edinburgh (1910-1910)

Fettes College, Edinburgh, was opened in 1870 under the terms of a trust 'for maintenance, education, and outfit of young people whose parents have either died without leaving sufficient funds for that purpose, or who, from innocent misfortune during their own lives, are unable to give suitable education to their children'. In 1923 this edition of the Fettes College Register was published; in it the compilers sought to set out for each boy who had attended the college a brief synopsis of what was known about his time at the school, his subsequent career, and date and place of death, or address as of 1923. Of course, for most of the boys entering the school in the early 20th century, their career was still ahead of them. After each name there is a letter in brackets indicating the house to which the pupil belonged - (C.) Carrington House; (G.) Glencorse House; (K.) Kimmerghame House; (M.) Moredun House; (S.) Schoolhouse. An asterisk indicates that the boy was a foundationer, i. e. supported by the foundation; a dagger that he was a foundation scholar. VIA. indicates Upper Form; Mods. Modern School; Army Cl., Army Class; S. P., School Prefect; xx. First Rugby Football Twenty; xv. First Rugby Football Fifteen; xx. cap. Caps occasionally given to the five (or fewer) next to the First Fifteen after 1875; xi. First Cricket Eleven; viii. Gymnastic Eight; Trs. Prizes and Exhib., Trustees' Prizes and Exhibitions; Govs. Prizes and Exhib., Governors' Prizes and Exhibitions; Schol., scholarship; M., married. Month and year of birth is given in square brackets.
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1910-1910)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Officials of Leeds University Societies (1910-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes this section giving details of all the university societies, with names of the presidents, vice-presidents, secretaries, treasurers, and committee members.
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Leeds University Arts, Science and Technology Students (1910-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of students registered for the session 1909 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first.
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Leeds University Medical Students (1910-1910)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes lists of students registered for the session 1909 to 1910. Full names are given, surname first.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1910-1910)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); year of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known.
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Steam Engine Makers in Acrefair (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Altrincham (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Ashton under Lyne (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Barnsley (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Barrow in Furness (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Barry Dock (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Basingstoke (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Beccles (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Belfast (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Benevolent Payments to Steam Engine Makers (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates). At the back of the report is this list of more substantial benevolent payments made to particularly needy cases.
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Steam Engine Makers in Birkenhead (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Birmingham (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Blackburn (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Bolton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Bradford (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Brighton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Brisbane (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Burnley (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Burton on Trent (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Bury (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Cardiff (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Carlisle (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Chatham (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Chester (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Chesterfield (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Church (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Coventry (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Cowes (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Crewe (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Darlington (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Derby (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Doncaster (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Dublin (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Dudley (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in East London (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Eastleigh (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Erith (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers excluded from their Union (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch. There is also this list of excluded members, branch by branch, with explanations given in some instances (such as 'for joining another society', 'paid up and resigned', 'forfeited proposition', &c.)
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Steam Engine Makers in Fleetwood (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Trustees of Steam Engine Makers' Society Funds (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch. Funds held in trust for the society are listed, with the names of the trustees.
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Steam Engine Makers in Gateshead (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Gibraltar (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Gillingham (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Glasgow (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Gloucester (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Gorton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Govan (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Grantham (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Greenwich (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Grimsby (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
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Steam Engine Makers in Guildford (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Hammersmith (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Harecastle (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Haslingden (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Hawarden (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Horwich (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Hull (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Hunslet (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Ipswich (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Jarrow on Tyne (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Kidderminster (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Leeds (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Leicester (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Leyland (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Liverpool (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in North West London (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in West Central London (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Lowestoft (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Luton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Malta (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Middlesbrough (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Miles Platting (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Montreal (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in North Shields (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in New Brompton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Newcastle on Tyne (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Newcastle (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Newport (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Newton le Willows (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Northwich (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Norwich (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Nottingham (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Oldham (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Patricroft (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Pembroke Dock (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Plymouth (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Portsmouth (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Preston (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Reading (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Reddish (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Redditch (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Ripley (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Rochdale (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Rochester (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Rodley (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Rotherham (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Rugby (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in South East Manchester (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in South Shields (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Salford (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Seacombe (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers' Society Branch Secretaries (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch; and, separately, this list of the names and addresses of all the branch secretaries.
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Sheerness (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Sheffield (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Smethwick (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Southampton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Southport (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in St Helens (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Staines (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Stapleford (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Stoke on Trent (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Sunderland (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Superannuated Steam Engine Makers (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch. There is also this list of superannuated members granted pensions by the society. In each case the entry gives full name; branch; year admitted; age when admitted to the society; date when superannuation was granted; age when superannuated; and rate per week.
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Superannuated Steam Engine Makers Obituary (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch. There is also this list of superannuated members granted pensions by the society who had died during 1910. In each case the entry gives full name; branch; date when superannuation was granted; rate per week; age when granted; age at death; and length of time superannuated.
>> Search this source

Newly Superannuated Steam Engine Makers (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch. There is also a list of superannuated members granted pensions by the society. In each case the entry gives full name; branch; year admitted; age when admitted to the society; date when superannuation was granted; age when superannuated; and rate per week; and then this list of member granted superannuation during 1910, with similar details.
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Sutton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Swindon (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Thetford (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Tipton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in West London (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in West Manchester (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Wallsend (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Walsall (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Warrington (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Weymouth (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Wigan (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Willington Quay (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Wolverhampton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Wolverton (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Woolston (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Woolwich (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Worcester (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in Yarmouth (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Steam Engine Makers in York (1910-1910)

The Steam Engine Makers' Society, a trades union, ended 1910 with 13,401 members in 144 branches. The 86th Annual Report gives a full list of members for each branch, followed by Travelling Expenses subsidised by the branch (with names and dates); Unemployed Expenses (with names and dates); Superannuation, Sick and Funeral Expenses (all with names and dates).
>> Search this source

Boys entering Clifton College (1910-1910)

Clifton College near Bristol was established in 1862. This edition of the Clifton College Annals and Register for the Old Cliftonian Society by F. Borwick was published in 1925. Boys are listed alphabetically by term of entry, with full names, surname first, in bold. Father's (or widowed mother's) name is given (surname and initials) in capitals, and address. Then there is the name of the house (N. T., North Town; S. H., School House; S. T., South Town), first and last forms, distinctions in school work and games, and month of leaving. Where known, the editor then gave a career summary with month of death; or, if still living, address as in 1925 (in italics).
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1910-1910)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Boys entering Giggleswick School (1910-1910)

The school at Giggleswick in the West Riding of Yorkshire dates from at least 1507, but no register of the boys attending there has survived earlier than one started by the headmaster, the reverend George Style, in 1875. When the bursar, H. L. Mullins, prepared this, 'The Giggleswick School Register', printed in 1913, he was able to compile general details of some scholars from earlier years, but the concerted, reasonably complete, account starts in 1859. The details are arranged by term of entry, then alphabetically by surname and christian name. Typically each description gives full name; date of birth; name and address of father; date of leaving. Where known, Mullins then added a brief career synopsis, present address in 1913, or date of death. From 1869 onwards boarders were admitted to the school, and where it is known that a boy was a day scholar, the word (Town) is added after his name; and from 1902 onwards school house names, where known, are given in brackets after the name. Of course, in the case of boys entering the school in the years immediately before 1913, their career lay in the future, and the record is just that of their name, school house, date of birth, and parentage.
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Boys entering Haileybury College, Hertfordshire (1910-1910)

Haileybury College, near Hertford, was founded by the East India Company in 1806, and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1864. This register of pupils entering the school from 1862 to 1931 was edited by a master there, Laurence Arthur Speakman. The boys are listed by term of joining the school, and then alphabetically by name (in bold), surname first (in capitals). There is then usually a precise birthdate, and the name and address of his father; his period at the school, starting with abbreviations to indicate the house to which he belonged (B., Batten; B. F., Bartle Frere; C., Colvin; E., Edmonstone; Ha., Hailey; Hi., Highfield; L., Lawrence; Le B., Le Bas; M., Melvill; Th., Thomason; T., Trevelyan), and the first and last forms attended (e. g., IV., fourth form). Where a member of a school team there is then an indication (e. g., XI., cricket). For some pupils, with whom the school had lost touch, Speakman was only able to record the details of their time at Haileybury; but for most a brief career synopsis is then given, and current address (as in 1931) or date of death.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1910-1910)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1910-1910)

This Second Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; a synopsis of his career; and, where known, his address as of 1925, in italics.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1910-1910)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Soldiers' Balances Unclaimed (1910-1910)

The War Office, under 'The Regimental Debts Act, 1893' compiled and published lists of names of deceased soldiers whose personal estate was held by the Secretary of State for War for distribution amongst the Next of Kin or others entitled. These lists give full name (surname first), rank, regiment, and the amount of the estate unclaimed. During 1910 new lists CCCCXXXI to CCCCXL relating to effects 1909-1910 were issued, as well as republications of lists CCCLXXX to CCCCXXX from previous years showing details of effects 1903-1909 still remaining unclaimed. In addition, List IV of Balances Due to Soldiers Discharged was issued (effects 1909-1910), as well as republication of Lists I to III for effects remaining unclaimed 1907-1909.
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Naturalizations (1910-1910)

The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1910, refer to naturalizations from December 1909 to November 1910. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.
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Members of Durham University (1910-1910)

The alphabetical list of all living members of Durham University, issued in 1910, was compiled from the Admission Book and University Register. It gives surname, initials, degree, college, and date. Those marked with an asterisk were Members of Convocation. In the case of graduates in Arts, Theology (except in the case of Bachelors of Divinity) and Civil Law, the dates refer to the year in which the examination for the degree of B.A. was passed; in the case of Bachelors of Divinity who were not Graduates in Arts, of Licentiates in Theology, of Civil Engineers, and of Licentiates in Medicine, to the year in which each passed the Final Examination. In the case of Hygiene, Science, and Music, to the year in which the Examination for B.Hy., B.Sc., or B.Mus. was passed; and in the case of Graduates in Medicine to the year in which the Examination for the degree of M.B. was passed, except in the case of practitioners, when the date refers to the year in which the examination for the degree specified was passed. In cases where no date is given the degree is Ad Eundem, unless it is marked honorary. The abbreviations are: Arms., Armstrong College, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; Codr., Codrington College, Barbados; Cos., Bishop Cosin's Hall; F. Bay, Fourah Bay, Sierra Leone; Hatf., Bishop Hatfield's Hall; Med., College of Medicine, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; St. Chad's, St Chad's Hall; St. John's, St John's Hall; Univ., University College.
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Durham University Matriculation Examination (1910-1910)

The list of students who satisfied the examiners, March 1910: surnames are given, with initials.
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Leeds University Fellows, Scholars and Exhibitioners (1910-1911)

Leeds University Calendar for the academic year 1910 to 1911 includes this list of fellows, scholars and exhibitioners. Full names are given, surname first, with date of election.
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Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire (1911-1911)

Wellington College, near Wokingham, was originally founded for the education of sons of military officers. A register of boys entering the school from First Term 1859 to Michaelmas 1933 was compiled by F. G. Lawrence for the Old Wellingtonian Society. In each entry the boy's name is given in full, in bold, surname first; age at entry (usually 11 to 14); then, in brackets, the name of the dormitory or house to which he belonged, in italics, with the years of his stay; then his father's name (usually surname and initials, but not christian name) with military decorations where appropriate. School prefects and captains are noted as such; if the boy played cricket for the school, XI with the years; academic honours, scholarships, &c.; a brief biography; and date of death, or (where known) address in 1933. Year of marriage is given, and sometimes the wife's name and/or her father's name. Clearly, those boys who kept contact with the school and/or had distinguished military careers have detailed entries; others disappeared into oblivion on leaving.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1911-1911)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1895 to 1927 there was a junior school, called Lower School (L. S.), taking in boys from the age of 8, many passing seamlessly into the main school at age 12 to 14. This is the index to the year 1911, when the Reverend Thomas Northmore Hart-Smith was headmaster.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1911-1911)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1911-1911)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Loretto School (1911-1911)

The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1911-1911)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Fettes College, Edinburgh (1911-1911)

Fettes College, Edinburgh, was opened in 1870 under the terms of a trust 'for maintenance, education, and outfit of young people whose parents have either died without leaving sufficient funds for that purpose, or who, from innocent misfortune during their own lives, are unable to give suitable education to their children'. In 1923 this edition of the Fettes College Register was published; in it the compilers sought to set out for each boy who had attended the college a brief synopsis of what was known about his time at the school, his subsequent career, and date and place of death, or address as of 1923. Of course, for most of the boys entering the school in the early 20th century, their career was still ahead of them. After each name there is a letter in brackets indicating the house to which the pupil belonged - (C.) Carrington House; (G.) Glencorse House; (K.) Kimmerghame House; (M.) Moredun House; (S.) Schoolhouse. An asterisk indicates that the boy was a foundationer, i. e. supported by the foundation; a dagger that he was a foundation scholar. VIA. indicates Upper Form; Mods. Modern School; Army Cl., Army Class; S. P., School Prefect; xx. First Rugby Football Twenty; xv. First Rugby Football Fifteen; xx. cap. Caps occasionally given to the five (or fewer) next to the First Fifteen after 1875; xi. First Cricket Eleven; viii. Gymnastic Eight; Trs. Prizes and Exhib., Trustees' Prizes and Exhibitions; Govs. Prizes and Exhib., Governors' Prizes and Exhibitions; Schol., scholarship; M., married. Month and year of birth is given in square brackets.
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1911-1911)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1911-1911)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); year of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known.
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Boys entering Clifton College (1911-1911)

Clifton College near Bristol was established in 1862. This edition of the Clifton College Annals and Register for the Old Cliftonian Society by F. Borwick was published in 1925. Boys are listed alphabetically by term of entry, with full names, surname first, in bold. Father's (or widowed mother's) name is given (surname and initials) in capitals, and address. Then there is the name of the house (N. T., North Town; S. H., School House; S. T., South Town), first and last forms, distinctions in school work and games, and month of leaving. Where known, the editor then gave a career summary with month of death; or, if still living, address as in 1925 (in italics).
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1911-1911)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Boys entering Giggleswick School (1911-1911)

The school at Giggleswick in the West Riding of Yorkshire dates from at least 1507, but no register of the boys attending there has survived earlier than one started by the headmaster, the reverend George Style, in 1875. When the bursar, H. L. Mullins, prepared this, 'The Giggleswick School Register', printed in 1913, he was able to compile general details of some scholars from earlier years, but the concerted, reasonably complete, account starts in 1859. The details are arranged by term of entry, then alphabetically by surname and christian name. Typically each description gives full name; date of birth; name and address of father; date of leaving. Where known, Mullins then added a brief career synopsis, present address in 1913, or date of death. From 1869 onwards boarders were admitted to the school, and where it is known that a boy was a day scholar, the word (Town) is added after his name; and from 1902 onwards school house names, where known, are given in brackets after the name. Of course, in the case of boys entering the school in the years immediately before 1913, their career lay in the future, and the record is just that of their name, school house, date of birth, and parentage.
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Eminent Accounts, Architects, Engineers &c. in Liverpool and Birkenhead (1911-1911)

The biographical part of 'Liverpool and Birkenhead in the Twentieth Century' was edited by William Thomas Pike. After opening with the Lord Bishop of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, there are three main sections, dealing with Nobility, Gentry and Commerce; the Learned Professions; Accountants, Architects, Engineers &c.; and an Obituary. Each biography usually (but not invariably) has a photograph; full name (surname first, in bold; christian name(s) in capitals) and address; birth place and date; father's name (and sometimes details); a short biography; whether married, with wife's name and her father's name and address.
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Wives of Eminent Accounts, Architects, Engineers &c. in Liverpool and Birkenhead (1911-1911)

The biographical part of 'Liverpool and Birkenhead in the Twentieth Century' was edited by William Thomas Pike. After opening with the Lord Bishop of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, there are three main sections, dealing with Nobility, Gentry and Commerce; the Learned Professions; Accountants, Architects, Engineers &c.; and an Obituary. Each biography usually (but not invariably) has a photograph; full name (surname first, in bold; christian name(s) in capitals) and address; birth place and date; father's name (and sometimes details); a short biography; whether married, with wife's name and her father's name and address.
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Eminent Members of the Learned Professions in Liverpool and Birkenhead (1911-1911)

The biographical part of 'Liverpool and Birkenhead in the Twentieth Century' was edited by William Thomas Pike. After opening with the Lord Bishop of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, there are three main sections, dealing with Nobility, Gentry and Commerce; the Learned Professions; Accountants, Architects, Engineers &c.; and an Obituary. Each biography usually (but not invariably) has a photograph; full name (surname first, in bold; christian name(s) in capitals) and address; birth place and date; father's name (and sometimes details); a short biography; whether married, with wife's name and her father's name and address.
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Wives of Eminent Members of the Learned Professions in Liverpool and Birkenhead (1911-1911)

The biographical part of 'Liverpool and Birkenhead in the Twentieth Century' was edited by William Thomas Pike. After opening with the Lord Bishop of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, there are three main sections, dealing with Nobility, Gentry and Commerce; the Learned Professions; Accountants, Architects, Engineers &c.; and an Obituary. Each biography usually (but not invariably) has a photograph; full name (surname first, in bold; christian name(s) in capitals) and address; birth place and date; father's name (and sometimes details); a short biography; whether married, with wife's name and her father's name and address.
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Nobility, Gentry and Men of Commerce in Liverpool and Birkenhead (1911-1911)

The biographical part of 'Liverpool and Birkenhead in the Twentieth Century' was edited by William Thomas Pike. After opening with the Lord Bishop of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, there are three main sections, dealing with Nobility, Gentry and Commerce; the Learned Professions; Accountants, Architects, Engineers &c.; and an Obituary. Each biography usually (but not invariably) has a photograph; full name (surname first, in bold; christian name(s) in capitals) and address; birth place and date; father's name (and sometimes details); a short biography; whether married, with wife's name and her father's name and address.
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Wives of Nobility, Gentry and Men of Commerce in Liverpool and Birkenhead (1911-1911)

The biographical part of 'Liverpool and Birkenhead in the Twentieth Century' was edited by William Thomas Pike. After opening with the Lord Bishop of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, there are three main sections, dealing with Nobility, Gentry and Commerce; the Learned Professions; Accountants, Architects, Engineers &c.; and an Obituary. Each biography usually (but not invariably) has a photograph; full name (surname first, in bold; christian name(s) in capitals) and address; birth place and date; father's name (and sometimes details); a short biography; whether married, with wife's name and her father's name and address.
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Obituary of the Eminent in Liverpool and Birkenhead (1911-1911)

The biographical part of 'Liverpool and Birkenhead in the Twentieth Century' was edited by William Thomas Pike. After opening with the Lord Bishop of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, there are three main sections, dealing with Nobility, Gentry and Commerce; the Learned Professions; Accountants, Architects, Engineers &c.; and an Obituary. Each biography usually (but not invariably) has a photograph; full name (surname first, in bold; christian name(s) in capitals) and address; birth place and date; father's name (and sometimes details); a short biography; whether married, with wife's name and her father's name and address.
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Wives mentioned in Obituary of the Eminent in Liverpool and Birkenhead (1911-1911)

The biographical part of 'Liverpool and Birkenhead in the Twentieth Century' was edited by William Thomas Pike. After opening with the Lord Bishop of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, there are three main sections, dealing with Nobility, Gentry and Commerce; the Learned Professions; Accountants, Architects, Engineers &c.; and an Obituary. Each biography usually (but not invariably) has a photograph; full name (surname first, in bold; christian name(s) in capitals) and address; birth place and date; father's name (and sometimes details); a short biography; whether married, with wife's name and her father's name and address.
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Boys entering Haileybury College, Hertfordshire (1911-1911)

Haileybury College, near Hertford, was founded by the East India Company in 1806, and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1864. This register of pupils entering the school from 1862 to 1931 was edited by a master there, Laurence Arthur Speakman. The boys are listed by term of joining the school, and then alphabetically by name (in bold), surname first (in capitals). There is then usually a precise birthdate, and the name and address of his father; his period at the school, starting with abbreviations to indicate the house to which he belonged (B., Batten; B. F., Bartle Frere; C., Colvin; E., Edmonstone; Ha., Hailey; Hi., Highfield; L., Lawrence; Le B., Le Bas; M., Melvill; Th., Thomason; T., Trevelyan), and the first and last forms attended (e. g., IV., fourth form). Where a member of a school team there is then an indication (e. g., XI., cricket). For some pupils, with whom the school had lost touch, Speakman was only able to record the details of their time at Haileybury; but for most a brief career synopsis is then given, and current address (as in 1931) or date of death.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1911-1911)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1911-1911)

This Second Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; a synopsis of his career; and, where known, his address as of 1925, in italics.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1911-1911)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Naturalizations (1911-1911)

The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1911, refer to naturalizations from December 1910 to November 1911. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.
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University of Ireland Diploma in Public Health (1911-1939)

The University of Ireland was established by royal charter in 1908, with three constituent colleges - University College, Dublin; University College, Cork; and University College, Galway. The university calendar for 1940 includes this list of those students awarded the Diploma in Public Health but who were not medical graduates in the university, although registered medical practitioners.
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Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire (1912-1912)

Wellington College, near Wokingham, was originally founded for the education of sons of military officers. A register of boys entering the school from First Term 1859 to Michaelmas 1933 was compiled by F. G. Lawrence for the Old Wellingtonian Society. In each entry the boy's name is given in full, in bold, surname first; age at entry (usually 11 to 14); then, in brackets, the name of the dormitory or house to which he belonged, in italics, with the years of his stay; then his father's name (usually surname and initials, but not christian name) with military decorations where appropriate. School prefects and captains are noted as such; if the boy played cricket for the school, XI with the years; academic honours, scholarships, &c.; a brief biography; and date of death, or (where known) address in 1933. Year of marriage is given, and sometimes the wife's name and/or her father's name. Clearly, those boys who kept contact with the school and/or had distinguished military careers have detailed entries; others disappeared into oblivion on leaving.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1912-1912)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1895 to 1927 there was a junior school, called Lower School (L. S.), taking in boys from the age of 8, many passing seamlessly into the main school at age 12 to 14. This is the index to the year 1912, when the Reverend Thomas Northmore Hart-Smith was headmaster.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1912-1912)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1912-1912)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Loretto School (1912-1912)

The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1912-1912)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Fettes College, Edinburgh (1912-1912)

Fettes College, Edinburgh, was opened in 1870 under the terms of a trust 'for maintenance, education, and outfit of young people whose parents have either died without leaving sufficient funds for that purpose, or who, from innocent misfortune during their own lives, are unable to give suitable education to their children'. In 1923 this edition of the Fettes College Register was published; in it the compilers sought to set out for each boy who had attended the college a brief synopsis of what was known about his time at the school, his subsequent career, and date and place of death, or address as of 1923. Of course, for most of the boys entering the school in the early 20th century, their career was still ahead of them. After each name there is a letter in brackets indicating the house to which the pupil belonged - (C.) Carrington House; (G.) Glencorse House; (K.) Kimmerghame House; (M.) Moredun House; (S.) Schoolhouse. An asterisk indicates that the boy was a foundationer, i. e. supported by the foundation; a dagger that he was a foundation scholar. VIA. indicates Upper Form; Mods. Modern School; Army Cl., Army Class; S. P., School Prefect; xx. First Rugby Football Twenty; xv. First Rugby Football Fifteen; xx. cap. Caps occasionally given to the five (or fewer) next to the First Fifteen after 1875; xi. First Cricket Eleven; viii. Gymnastic Eight; Trs. Prizes and Exhib., Trustees' Prizes and Exhibitions; Govs. Prizes and Exhib., Governors' Prizes and Exhibitions; Schol., scholarship; M., married. Month and year of birth is given in square brackets.
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1912-1912)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1912-1912)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); year of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known.
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Boys entering Clifton College (1912-1912)

Clifton College near Bristol was established in 1862. This edition of the Clifton College Annals and Register for the Old Cliftonian Society by F. Borwick was published in 1925. Boys are listed alphabetically by term of entry, with full names, surname first, in bold. Father's (or widowed mother's) name is given (surname and initials) in capitals, and address. Then there is the name of the house (N. T., North Town; S. H., School House; S. T., South Town), first and last forms, distinctions in school work and games, and month of leaving. Where known, the editor then gave a career summary with month of death; or, if still living, address as in 1925 (in italics).
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1912-1912)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Naturalized Aliens (1912-1912)

The Home Office issued a monthly list of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization (or of Readmission to British Nationality) had been granted by the Secretary of State, and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered. The lists are arranged alphabetically by surname and forename; then give country of origin, date of taking oath of allegiance, and place of residence. This is the list issued in October 1912 of those naturalized in September 1912.
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Boys entering Giggleswick School (1912-1912)

The school at Giggleswick in the West Riding of Yorkshire dates from at least 1507, but no register of the boys attending there has survived earlier than one started by the headmaster, the reverend George Style, in 1875. When the bursar, H. L. Mullins, prepared this, 'The Giggleswick School Register', printed in 1913, he was able to compile general details of some scholars from earlier years, but the concerted, reasonably complete, account starts in 1859. The details are arranged by term of entry, then alphabetically by surname and christian name. Typically each description gives full name; date of birth; name and address of father; date of leaving. Where known, Mullins then added a brief career synopsis, present address in 1913, or date of death. From 1869 onwards boarders were admitted to the school, and where it is known that a boy was a day scholar, the word (Town) is added after his name; and from 1902 onwards school house names, where known, are given in brackets after the name. Of course, in the case of boys entering the school in the years immediately before 1913, their career lay in the future, and the record is just that of their name, school house, date of birth, and parentage.
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Boys entering Haileybury College, Hertfordshire (1912-1912)

Haileybury College, near Hertford, was founded by the East India Company in 1806, and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1864. This register of pupils entering the school from 1862 to 1931 was edited by a master there, Laurence Arthur Speakman. The boys are listed by term of joining the school, and then alphabetically by name (in bold), surname first (in capitals). There is then usually a precise birthdate, and the name and address of his father; his period at the school, starting with abbreviations to indicate the house to which he belonged (B., Batten; B. F., Bartle Frere; C., Colvin; E., Edmonstone; Ha., Hailey; Hi., Highfield; L., Lawrence; Le B., Le Bas; M., Melvill; Th., Thomason; T., Trevelyan), and the first and last forms attended (e. g., IV., fourth form). Where a member of a school team there is then an indication (e. g., XI., cricket). For some pupils, with whom the school had lost touch, Speakman was only able to record the details of their time at Haileybury; but for most a brief career synopsis is then given, and current address (as in 1931) or date of death.
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Imperial Service Medal: Home Civil Service (1912-1912)

On 30 September 1912 king George V awarded the Imperial Service Medal to retired members of the Home Civil Service and the Colonial Civil Service (not being administrative or clerical staff) for long and meritorious service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with office or rank, and place.
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Imperial Service Medal: Colonial Civil Service: Singapore (1912-1912)

On 30 September 1912 king George V awarded the Imperial Service Medal to retired members of the Home Civil Service and the Colonial Civil Service (not being administrative or clerical staff) for long and meritorious service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with office or rank, and place.
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Imperial Service Medal: Colonial Civil Service: South Australia (1912-1912)

On 30 September 1912 king George V awarded the Imperial Service Medal to retired members of the Home Civil Service and the Colonial Civil Service (not being administrative or clerical staff) for long and meritorious service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with office or rank, and place.
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Imperial Service Medal: Colonial Civil Service: Trinidad (1912-1912)

On 30 September 1912 king George V awarded the Imperial Service Medal to retired members of the Home Civil Service and the Colonial Civil Service (not being administrative or clerical staff) for long and meritorious service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with office or rank, and place.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1912-1912)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Partnerships Dissolved (1912-1912)

Notices of the dissolution of business and trading partnerships in England and Wales gazetted in October 1912.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1912-1912)

This Second Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; a synopsis of his career; and, where known, his address as of 1925, in italics.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1912-1912)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Naturalizations (1912-1912)

The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1912, refer to naturalizations from December 1911 to November 1912. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.
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Blind Annuitants (1912-1912)

The General Register of Blind Annuitants for 1912 listed nearly 6000 recipients of annuities from various charities and trusts in the British Isles. This index sets out the same information again in tabular form, giving: register number; surname; christian name or initials; full address; year of birth or age; amount of annual payment; year of appointment; recurrence (if renewed: yearly, weekly, or monthly); and abbreviated name of the charity. Many individuals were receiving sums from more than one source. Where (n) is given after the surname, it indicates a pension granted since the last previous edition; (+) shows an increase in pension; (-) a decrease.
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Estates of the Deceased: Bath (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: British Columbia (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Bedfordshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Berkshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Berwick-on-Tweed (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Bournemouth (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Bristol (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Birmingham (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Buckinghamshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Cambridgeshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Cardiff (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Cardiganshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Carmarthenshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Carnarvonshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Cheshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: County Cork (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Cornwall (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Cumberland (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Denbighshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Derbyshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Devon (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Dorset (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: County Durham (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Egypt (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Essex (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Flintshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Glamorganshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Gloucestershire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Gold Coast (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Guatemala (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Hampshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Herefordshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Hertfordshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Kingston-on-Hull (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Kent (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Kentucky (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Lancashire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Leicestershire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Lincolnshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Liverpool (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: London (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Madras (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Merionethshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Middlesex (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Mold (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Monmouthshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Montgomeryshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Nairobi (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Norfolk (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Northamptonshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Northumberland (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Norwich (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Nottinghamshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: New Zealand (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Philadelphia (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Radnorshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Shropshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Somerset (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Staffordshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Suffolk (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Sunderland (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Surrey (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Sussex (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Transvaal (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: United Provinces (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Victoria (Australia) (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Warwickshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Westminster (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Westmorland (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Wiltshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Worcestershire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Yorkshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators. Also included in this index are some other similar notices relating to claims on such estates. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Bedfordshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Berwick-on-Tweed (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Bournemouth (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Bristol (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Birmingham (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Buckinghamshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Cardiff (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Cardiganshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Carmarthenshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Carnarvonshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Cheshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: County Cork (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Cornwall (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Cumberland (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Denbighshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Derbyshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Devon (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Dorset (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: County Durham (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Essex (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Glamorganshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Gloucestershire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Guatemala (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Hampshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Herefordshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Hertfordshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Kingston on Hull (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Kent (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Lancashire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Leicestershire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Lincolnshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Liverpool (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: London (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Merionethshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Middlesex (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Mold (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Monmouthshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Montgomeryshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Norfolk (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Northumberland (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Nottinghamshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: New Zealand (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Shropshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Somerset (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Staffordshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Suffolk (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Surrey (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Sussex (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Transvaal (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Warwickshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Westminster (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Westmorland (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Wiltshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Worcestershire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Estates of the Deceased: Executors: Yorkshire (1912-1912)

Notices re claims on estates of the deceased, mostly pursuant to 22 & 23 Vic. c.35, An Act to Further Amend the Law of Property and to Relieve Trustees, also known as the Law of Property Amendment Act. These notices usually give the full name and final address of the deceased, date of death, where the will was proved or administration granted, and the full names of the executors or administrators, both of which are included in this index. October 1912.
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Proprietors of Property in London (1912-1912)

The Land Registry return of 'Persons about to be registered as Proprietors of Properies with Absolute or Good Leasehold Title' under the Land Transfer Acts of 1875 and 1897 gives: the number of title; county; parish or place; name and short description of the land; whether freehold or leasehold; the full name of the proprietor, with address and description. October 1912.
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Proprietors of Property in Hertfordshire (1912-1912)

The Land Registry return of 'Persons about to be registered as Proprietors of Properies with Absolute or Good Leasehold Title' under the Land Transfer Acts of 1875 and 1897 gives: the number of title; county; parish or place; name and short description of the land; whether freehold or leasehold; the full name of the proprietor, with address and description. October 1912.
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Proprietors of Property in London (1912-1912)

The Land Registry return of 'Persons about to be registered as Proprietors of Properies with Absolute or Good Leasehold Title' under the Land Transfer Acts of 1875 and 1897 gives: the number of title; county; parish or place; name and short description of the land; whether freehold or leasehold; the full name of the proprietor, with address and description. October 1912.
>> Search this source

Proprietors of Property in Suffolk (1912-1912)

The Land Registry return of 'Persons about to be registered as Proprietors of Properies with Absolute or Good Leasehold Title' under the Land Transfer Acts of 1875 and 1897 gives: the number of title; county; parish or place; name and short description of the land; whether freehold or leasehold; the full name of the proprietor, with address and description. October 1912.
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Proprietors of Property in Surrey (1912-1912)

The Land Registry return of 'Persons about to be registered as Proprietors of Properies with Absolute or Good Leasehold Title' under the Land Transfer Acts of 1875 and 1897 gives: the number of title; county; parish or place; name and short description of the land; whether freehold or leasehold; the full name of the proprietor, with address and description. October 1912.
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Civil Servants and Office Holders (1913-1913)

The Imperial Calendar gives lists of officials and office-holders throughout England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland
>> Search this source

Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire (1913-1913)

Wellington College, near Wokingham, was originally founded for the education of sons of military officers. A register of boys entering the school from First Term 1859 to Michaelmas 1933 was compiled by F. G. Lawrence for the Old Wellingtonian Society. In each entry the boy's name is given in full, in bold, surname first; age at entry (usually 11 to 14); then, in brackets, the name of the dormitory or house to which he belonged, in italics, with the years of his stay; then his father's name (usually surname and initials, but not christian name) with military decorations where appropriate. School prefects and captains are noted as such; if the boy played cricket for the school, XI with the years; academic honours, scholarships, &c.; a brief biography; and date of death, or (where known) address in 1933. Year of marriage is given, and sometimes the wife's name and/or her father's name. Clearly, those boys who kept contact with the school and/or had distinguished military careers have detailed entries; others disappeared into oblivion on leaving.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1913-1913)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1895 to 1927 there was a junior school, called Lower School (L. S.), taking in boys from the age of 8, many passing seamlessly into the main school at age 12 to 14. This is the index to the year 1913, when the Reverend Thomas Northmore Hart-Smith was headmaster.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1913-1913)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1913-1913)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Loretto School (1913-1913)

The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1913-1913)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Fettes College, Edinburgh (1913-1913)

Fettes College, Edinburgh, was opened in 1870 under the terms of a trust 'for maintenance, education, and outfit of young people whose parents have either died without leaving sufficient funds for that purpose, or who, from innocent misfortune during their own lives, are unable to give suitable education to their children'. In 1923 this edition of the Fettes College Register was published; in it the compilers sought to set out for each boy who had attended the college a brief synopsis of what was known about his time at the school, his subsequent career, and date and place of death, or address as of 1923. Of course, for most of the boys entering the school in the early 20th century, their career was still ahead of them. After each name there is a letter in brackets indicating the house to which the pupil belonged - (C.) Carrington House; (G.) Glencorse House; (K.) Kimmerghame House; (M.) Moredun House; (S.) Schoolhouse. An asterisk indicates that the boy was a foundationer, i. e. supported by the foundation; a dagger that he was a foundation scholar. VIA. indicates Upper Form; Mods. Modern School; Army Cl., Army Class; S. P., School Prefect; xx. First Rugby Football Twenty; xv. First Rugby Football Fifteen; xx. cap. Caps occasionally given to the five (or fewer) next to the First Fifteen after 1875; xi. First Cricket Eleven; viii. Gymnastic Eight; Trs. Prizes and Exhib., Trustees' Prizes and Exhibitions; Govs. Prizes and Exhib., Governors' Prizes and Exhibitions; Schol., scholarship; M., married. Month and year of birth is given in square brackets.
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1913-1913)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1913-1913)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); year of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known.
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Boys entering Clifton College (1913-1913)

Clifton College near Bristol was established in 1862. This edition of the Clifton College Annals and Register for the Old Cliftonian Society by F. Borwick was published in 1925. Boys are listed alphabetically by term of entry, with full names, surname first, in bold. Father's (or widowed mother's) name is given (surname and initials) in capitals, and address. Then there is the name of the house (N. T., North Town; S. H., School House; S. T., South Town), first and last forms, distinctions in school work and games, and month of leaving. Where known, the editor then gave a career summary with month of death; or, if still living, address as in 1925 (in italics).
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1913-1913)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Boys entering Giggleswick School (1913-1913)

The school at Giggleswick in the West Riding of Yorkshire dates from at least 1507, but no register of the boys attending there has survived earlier than one started by the headmaster, the reverend George Style, in 1875. When the bursar, H. L. Mullins, prepared this, 'The Giggleswick School Register', printed in 1913, he was able to compile general details of some scholars from earlier years, but the concerted, reasonably complete, account starts in 1859. The details are arranged by term of entry, then alphabetically by surname and christian name. Typically each description gives full name; date of birth; name and address of father; date of leaving. Where known, Mullins then added a brief career synopsis, present address in 1913, or date of death. From 1869 onwards boarders were admitted to the school, and where it is known that a boy was a day scholar, the word (Town) is added after his name; and from 1902 onwards school house names, where known, are given in brackets after the name. Of course, in the case of boys entering the school in the years immediately before 1913, their career lay in the future, and the record is just that of their name, school house, date of birth, and parentage.
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Boys entering Haileybury College, Hertfordshire (1913-1913)

Haileybury College, near Hertford, was founded by the East India Company in 1806, and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1864. This register of pupils entering the school from 1862 to 1931 was edited by a master there, Laurence Arthur Speakman. The boys are listed by term of joining the school, and then alphabetically by name (in bold), surname first (in capitals). There is then usually a precise birthdate, and the name and address of his father; his period at the school, starting with abbreviations to indicate the house to which he belonged (B., Batten; B. F., Bartle Frere; C., Colvin; E., Edmonstone; Ha., Hailey; Hi., Highfield; L., Lawrence; Le B., Le Bas; M., Melvill; Th., Thomason; T., Trevelyan), and the first and last forms attended (e. g., IV., fourth form). Where a member of a school team there is then an indication (e. g., XI., cricket). For some pupils, with whom the school had lost touch, Speakman was only able to record the details of their time at Haileybury; but for most a brief career synopsis is then given, and current address (as in 1931) or date of death.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1913-1913)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1913-1913)

This Second Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; a synopsis of his career; and, where known, his address as of 1925, in italics.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1913-1913)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Naturalizations (1913-1913)

The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1913, refer to naturalizations from December 1912 to November 1913. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.
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University of Ireland Higher Diploma in Education (1913-1939)

The University of Ireland was established by royal charter in 1908, with three constituent colleges - University College, Dublin; University College, Cork; and University College, Galway. The university calendar for 1940 includes this list of those students awarded the Higher Diploma in Education but who were not graduates in the university.
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Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire (1914-1914)

Wellington College, near Wokingham, was originally founded for the education of sons of military officers. A register of boys entering the school from First Term 1859 to Michaelmas 1933 was compiled by F. G. Lawrence for the Old Wellingtonian Society. In each entry the boy's name is given in full, in bold, surname first; age at entry (usually 11 to 14); then, in brackets, the name of the dormitory or house to which he belonged, in italics, with the years of his stay; then his father's name (usually surname and initials, but not christian name) with military decorations where appropriate. School prefects and captains are noted as such; if the boy played cricket for the school, XI with the years; academic honours, scholarships, &c.; a brief biography; and date of death, or (where known) address in 1933. Year of marriage is given, and sometimes the wife's name and/or her father's name. Clearly, those boys who kept contact with the school and/or had distinguished military careers have detailed entries; others disappeared into oblivion on leaving.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1914-1914)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1895 to 1927 there was a junior school, called Lower School (L. S.), taking in boys from the age of 8, many passing seamlessly into the main school at age 12 to 14. This is the index to the year 1914, when the Reverend Canon Walter John Barton succeeded the Reverend Thomas Northmore Hart-Smith as headmaster.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1914-1914)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1914-1914)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Loretto School (1914-1914)

The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1914-1914)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Fettes College, Edinburgh (1914-1914)

Fettes College, Edinburgh, was opened in 1870 under the terms of a trust 'for maintenance, education, and outfit of young people whose parents have either died without leaving sufficient funds for that purpose, or who, from innocent misfortune during their own lives, are unable to give suitable education to their children'. In 1923 this edition of the Fettes College Register was published; in it the compilers sought to set out for each boy who had attended the college a brief synopsis of what was known about his time at the school, his subsequent career, and date and place of death, or address as of 1923. Of course, for most of the boys entering the school in the early 20th century, their career was still ahead of them. After each name there is a letter in brackets indicating the house to which the pupil belonged - (C.) Carrington House; (G.) Glencorse House; (K.) Kimmerghame House; (M.) Moredun House; (S.) Schoolhouse. An asterisk indicates that the boy was a foundationer, i. e. supported by the foundation; a dagger that he was a foundation scholar. VIA. indicates Upper Form; Mods. Modern School; Army Cl., Army Class; S. P., School Prefect; xx. First Rugby Football Twenty; xv. First Rugby Football Fifteen; xx. cap. Caps occasionally given to the five (or fewer) next to the First Fifteen after 1875; xi. First Cricket Eleven; viii. Gymnastic Eight; Trs. Prizes and Exhib., Trustees' Prizes and Exhibitions; Govs. Prizes and Exhib., Governors' Prizes and Exhibitions; Schol., scholarship; M., married. Month and year of birth is given in square brackets.
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1914-1914)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1914-1914)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); year of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known.
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Boys entering Clifton College (1914-1914)

Clifton College near Bristol was established in 1862. This edition of the Clifton College Annals and Register for the Old Cliftonian Society by F. Borwick was published in 1925. Boys are listed alphabetically by term of entry, with full names, surname first, in bold. Father's (or widowed mother's) name is given (surname and initials) in capitals, and address. Then there is the name of the house (N. T., North Town; S. H., School House; S. T., South Town), first and last forms, distinctions in school work and games, and month of leaving. Where known, the editor then gave a career summary with month of death; or, if still living, address as in 1925 (in italics).
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1914-1914)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Boys entering Haileybury College, Hertfordshire (1914-1914)

Haileybury College, near Hertford, was founded by the East India Company in 1806, and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1864. This register of pupils entering the school from 1862 to 1931 was edited by a master there, Laurence Arthur Speakman. The boys are listed by term of joining the school, and then alphabetically by name (in bold), surname first (in capitals). There is then usually a precise birthdate, and the name and address of his father; his period at the school, starting with abbreviations to indicate the house to which he belonged (B., Batten; B. F., Bartle Frere; C., Colvin; E., Edmonstone; Ha., Hailey; Hi., Highfield; L., Lawrence; Le B., Le Bas; M., Melvill; Th., Thomason; T., Trevelyan), and the first and last forms attended (e. g., IV., fourth form). Where a member of a school team there is then an indication (e. g., XI., cricket). For some pupils, with whom the school had lost touch, Speakman was only able to record the details of their time at Haileybury; but for most a brief career synopsis is then given, and current address (as in 1931) or date of death.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1914-1914)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1914-1914)

This Second Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; a synopsis of his career; and, where known, his address as of 1925, in italics.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1914-1914)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Naturalizations (1914-1914)

The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1914, refer to naturalizations from December 1913 to November 1914. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship. From April 1914 onwards the information is expanded by the addition of a column for occupation.
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Soldiers' Balances Unclaimed (1914-1914)

The War Office, under 'The Regimental Debts Act, 1893' compiled and published lists of names of deceased soldiers whose personal estate was held by the Secretary of State for War for distribution amongst the Next of Kin or others entitled. These lists give full name (surname first), rank, regiment, and the amount of the estate unclaimed. During 1914 new lists CCCCLXXI to CCCCLXXX relating to effects 1913-1914 were issued, as well as republications of lists CCCCXI to CCCCLXX from previous years showing details of effects 1907-1913 still remaining unclaimed. In addition, List VIII of Balances Due to Soldiers Discharged was issued (effects 1913-1914), as well as republication of Lists II to VII for effects remaining unclaimed 1907-1913.
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Naval Ratings Killed in 1914 (1914-1914)

The monthly lists of Royal Navy ratings killed from the start of the Great War through to the end of December 1914 are aranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with rank, and official number. The lists include marines, reservists, and a few civilian canteen staff also killed in the conflict. Full names are given, except for a few cases where a middle name is represented only by an initial.
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Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Colour-Sergeants (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
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Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Company Quartermaster-Sergeants (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Corporals (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Company Sergeant-Majors (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Drummers (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Guardsmen (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Lance-Corporals (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Lance-Sargeants (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Quartermaster-Sergeants (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Sergeant-Majors (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Sergeants (1914-1918)

203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Abbey Mills Pumping Station Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Architect's Department (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Asylums & Mental Deficiency Department (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Banstead Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Barking Outfall Works Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Bexley Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Blackwall Tunnel Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Botany School Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Bridges & Embankments Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Cane Hill Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Chief Engineer's Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Claybury Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Colney Hatch Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Crossness Outfall Works Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Deptford Pumping Station Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Clerk of the Council Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Comptroller's Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Education Officer's Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Estate & Valuation Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Ewell Colony Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Greenwich Tunnel Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Hanwell Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Horton Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Housing Department Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Industrial & Special Schools Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Fire Brigade Administration Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Firemen (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Fire Brigade Workshop Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Long Grove Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: North Woolwich Pumping Station Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Parks Department Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Public Control Department Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Public Health Department Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Rotherhithe Tunnel Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London School Attendance Officers (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Schoolkeepers (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Secondary School & Training College Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Sewerage and Drainage Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Sludge Vessel Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Solicitor's Department Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Stocktakers (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London C. C. Stores Department Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Teaching Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Technical Institute & School of Art Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: The Manor Mental Hospital Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: London Tramways Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Western Pumping Station Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Roll of Honour: Woolwich Ferry & Tunnel Staff (1914-1918)

The London County Council published a 'Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council's Staff' in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.
>> Search this source

Surgeons killed in the Great War (1914-1920)

The Royal College of Surgeons, established by royal charters, issued this calendar 1 August 1928, including official lists of all its fellows, members, licentiates and diplomates. There is also this Roll of Honour, of fellows, members, and licentiates in dental surgery, who had been killed in action or lost their lives from wounds or disease contracted while on active service abroad with His Majesty's Forces. In each case full name is given (surname first), rank and unit, and year of admission to membership, fellowship or licentiateship as appropriate.
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War Services of British Army Officers (1915-1915)

Hart's Annual Army List, Special Reserve List and Territorial Force List for 1915 includes this section entitled 'War Services of the Officers of the Active List', covering not only serving officers of the regular army, but also officers of the militia (marked (m)), special reserve (r), territorials (t), volunteers (v) and yeomanry (y). The detailed descriptions of the officers' war services relate not to the Great War, but to previous campaigns, particularly those in South Africa, Egypt, India and China. The regiment &c. in which the officer was currently serving is shown in brackets after his name.
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Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire (1915-1915)

Wellington College, near Wokingham, was originally founded for the education of sons of military officers. A register of boys entering the school from First Term 1859 to Michaelmas 1933 was compiled by F. G. Lawrence for the Old Wellingtonian Society. In each entry the boy's name is given in full, in bold, surname first; age at entry (usually 11 to 14); then, in brackets, the name of the dormitory or house to which he belonged, in italics, with the years of his stay; then his father's name (usually surname and initials, but not christian name) with military decorations where appropriate. School prefects and captains are noted as such; if the boy played cricket for the school, XI with the years; academic honours, scholarships, &c.; a brief biography; and date of death, or (where known) address in 1933. Year of marriage is given, and sometimes the wife's name and/or her father's name. Clearly, those boys who kept contact with the school and/or had distinguished military careers have detailed entries; others disappeared into oblivion on leaving.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1915-1915)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1895 to 1927 there was a junior school, called Lower School (L. S.), taking in boys from the age of 8, many passing seamlessly into the main school at age 12 to 14. This is the index to the year 1915, when the Reverend Canon Walter John Barton was headmaster.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1915-1915)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1915-1915)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Loretto School (1915-1915)

The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1915-1915)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Fettes College, Edinburgh (1915-1915)

Fettes College, Edinburgh, was opened in 1870 under the terms of a trust 'for maintenance, education, and outfit of young people whose parents have either died without leaving sufficient funds for that purpose, or who, from innocent misfortune during their own lives, are unable to give suitable education to their children'. In 1923 this edition of the Fettes College Register was published; in it the compilers sought to set out for each boy who had attended the college a brief synopsis of what was known about his time at the school, his subsequent career, and date and place of death, or address as of 1923. Of course, for most of the boys entering the school in the early 20th century, their career was still ahead of them. After each name there is a letter in brackets indicating the house to which the pupil belonged - (C.) Carrington House; (G.) Glencorse House; (K.) Kimmerghame House; (M.) Moredun House; (S.) Schoolhouse. An asterisk indicates that the boy was a foundationer, i. e. supported by the foundation; a dagger that he was a foundation scholar. VIA. indicates Upper Form; Mods. Modern School; Army Cl., Army Class; S. P., School Prefect; xx. First Rugby Football Twenty; xv. First Rugby Football Fifteen; xx. cap. Caps occasionally given to the five (or fewer) next to the First Fifteen after 1875; xi. First Cricket Eleven; viii. Gymnastic Eight; Trs. Prizes and Exhib., Trustees' Prizes and Exhibitions; Govs. Prizes and Exhib., Governors' Prizes and Exhibitions; Schol., scholarship; M., married. Month and year of birth is given in square brackets.
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1915-1915)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys mentioned were alive in 1969. The boys are listed alphabetically by surname under the term in which they entered the school. Full name is given, in bold, surname first. Then an abbreviation indicating their house (B, Beevor's; K, Kennedy's; M, McGill's; P, Paull's; SH, School House); the period of stay at the school; address as of 1969; father's name, occupation and residence (where the father had also studied at the school, his name is given in capitals with the year of his entry); brief details of any achievements at the school (particularly at sports); and the briefest of details of subsequent career.
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Boys entering Brighton College (1915-1915)

This edition of the Brighton College Register was published in 1922. The plan of the publication was to list boys by year or, later, term of entry. Each name is assigned a sequential number, 5000 boys, in all, being recorded. Full name is given (surname first, in bold); date of birth; year of leaving; and then (wherever the compiler had such information) a short biography, ending with date of death, where known. Of course, for the boys entering the school in the last few years up to 1922, the details are little more than name and date of birth.
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Boys entering Clifton College (1915-1915)

Clifton College near Bristol was established in 1862. This edition of the Clifton College Annals and Register for the Old Cliftonian Society by F. Borwick was published in 1925. Boys are listed alphabetically by term of entry, with full names, surname first, in bold. Father's (or widowed mother's) name is given (surname and initials) in capitals, and address. Then there is the name of the house (N. T., North Town; S. H., School House; S. T., South Town), first and last forms, distinctions in school work and games, and month of leaving. Where known, the editor then gave a career summary with month of death; or, if still living, address as in 1925 (in italics). Of course, in the case of boys entering the school in the years immediately before 1925, they were either still at school or their careers were still ahead of them.
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Boys entering Trinity College, Glenalmond (1915-1915)

Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, was originally founded as a college at which young men might be trained for the ministry of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and the sons of the laity might be educated and brought up in the faith and tradition of the Church. In 1876 the Theological College was transferred to Edinburgh, Glenalmond remaining as a boys' school. This second edition of the school register, edited by G. St Quintin, was published in 1955, incorporating the text of the first edition prepared by E. W. Neish. The scholars are listed by term of entering the school, and then alphabetically by surname; the details then given are full christian names, date of birth; name of father; any distinctions within the school; and then a career synopsis, with date and place of death where known.
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Boys entering Haileybury College, Hertfordshire (1915-1915)

Haileybury College, near Hertford, was founded by the East India Company in 1806, and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1864. This register of pupils entering the school from 1862 to 1931 was edited by a master there, Laurence Arthur Speakman. The boys are listed by term of joining the school, and then alphabetically by name (in bold), surname first (in capitals). There is then usually a precise birthdate, and the name and address of his father; his period at the school, starting with abbreviations to indicate the house to which he belonged (B., Batten; B. F., Bartle Frere; C., Colvin; E., Edmonstone; Ha., Hailey; Hi., Highfield; L., Lawrence; Le B., Le Bas; M., Melvill; Th., Thomason; T., Trevelyan), and the first and last forms attended (e. g., IV., fourth form). Where a member of a school team there is then an indication (e. g., XI., cricket). For some pupils, with whom the school had lost touch, Speakman was only able to record the details of their time at Haileybury; but for most a brief career synopsis is then given, and current address (as in 1931) or date of death.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1915-1915)

King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering Harrow School (1915-1915)

This Second Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; a synopsis of his career; and, where known, his address as of 1925, in italics.
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Boys entering Manchester Grammar School (1915-1915)

This Biographical Register of Old Mancunians lists boys alphabetically by year of entering the school. A bare register of entrants existed from 1888 onwards but it was only since the Second World War that any kind of detailed record was kept of those who passed through the school. So, in every case in this printed register, full name is given, in bold, surname first (in capitals); date of birth, and years attending the school; but for the earlier years sometimes there is no more information - or, equally, after investigation among Old Mancunians and published sources, the editors may have been able to furnish a condensed biography. An asterisk indicates a holder of a Foundation Scholarship. In the later years a current address is also given, as of 1964 to 1965, when the book was prepared.
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Naturalizations (1915-1915)

The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered in the Home Office. These notices, from January to December 1915, refer to naturalizations from December 1914 to November 1915. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; place of residence; and occupation. An dagger indicates re-admission to British nationality.
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Naval Ratings Killed in 1915 (1915-1915)

The monthly lists of Royal Navy ratings killed from the start of the Great War from January to December 1915 are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with rank, and official number. The lists include marines, merchant navy, reservists, and a few civilian canteen staff also killed in the conflict. Full names are given, except for a few cases where a middle name is represented only by an initial.
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University of Ireland Certificate in Commerce (1915-1931)

The University of Ireland was established by royal charter in 1908, with three constituent colleges - University College, Dublin; University College, Cork; and University College, Galway. The university calendar for 1940 includes this list of those students awarded the Certificate in Commerce but who were not graduates in the university.
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Killed in action at Jutland Bank (1916-1916)

Roll of the officers and men of the Royal Navy killed in action at Jutland Bank, 31st May 1916
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Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire (1916-1916)

Wellington College, near Wokingham, was originally founded for the education of sons of military officers. A register of boys entering the school from First Term 1859 to Michaelmas 1933 was compiled by F. G. Lawrence for the Old Wellingtonian Society. In each entry the boy's name is given in full, in bold, surname first; age at entry (usually 11 to 14); then, in brackets, the name of the dormitory or house to which he belonged, in italics, with the years of his stay; then his father's name (usually surname and initials, but not christian name) with military decorations where appropriate. School prefects and captains are noted as such; if the boy played cricket for the school, XI with the years; academic honours, scholarships, &c.; a brief biography; and date of death, or (where known) address in 1933. Year of marriage is given, and sometimes the wife's name and/or her father's name. Clearly, those boys who kept contact with the school and/or had distinguished military careers have detailed entries; others disappeared into oblivion on leaving.
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Boys entering Epsom College (1916-1916)

The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1895 to 1927 there was a junior school, called Lower School (L. S.), taking in boys from the age of 8, many passing seamlessly into the main school at age 12 to 14. This is the index to the year 1916, when the Reverend Canon Walter John Barton was headmaster.
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Boys entering Marlborough College (1916-1916)

The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1916-1916)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Lodgers in Buxton in Derbyshire (1916-1916)

The 1916 Directory of Buxton includes this semi-alphabetical 'List of Lodger Voters in Buxton, Fairfield, Burbage and Hartington-Upper-Quarter. (Entitled to vote as Parliamentary Voters, but not as County Electors.)'
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Residents of Buxton in Derbyshire (1916-1916)

The 1916 Directory of Buxton includes this alphabetical list of residents with their addresses. It includes Fairfield, but not Harpur Hill.
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Boys entering Loretto School (1916-1916)

The Reverend Dr Thomas Langhorne, who came to Musselburgh in Midlothian as an Episcopalian Church clergyman, established a small school for boarders and day scholars at Loretto House, so called because the grounds contained the ruins of the mediaeval chapel of St Mary of Loretto. To celebrate the centenary of the school in 1925, a second edition of the school register was published, edited by A. H. Buchanan-Dunlop. Relatively little was known of many of the earliest scholars, but from 1835 onwards the register generally gives full name, in capitals, surname first; date of birth; period of time at Loretto; a brief biography; date of death; whether brother of any other boy in the register; and a sequential number.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1916-1916)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Soldiers dying in the Great War: Army Service Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the Roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers dying in the Great War: Coldstream Guards (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers dying in the Great War: Highland Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers dying of wounds (1916-1916)

During the Great War the announcement page of The Times of London carried, after the Births, Marriages and Deaths, sections for Killed in Action and Died of Wounds. This is the index to the latter for 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Bedfordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Devonshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: East Kent Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Essex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: East Yorkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Gloucestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Gordon Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Hampshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Highland Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Household Cavalry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: King's Own Scottish Borderers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Yorkshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: King's Royal Rifle Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Lincolnshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Liverpool Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Monmouthshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Norfolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Northamptonshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Northumberland Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Officers died of wounds (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Army Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Garrison Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Rifle Brigade (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Irish Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Irish Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Irish Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Munster Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Scots Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal West Surrey Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Somersetshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Suffolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: York and Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Yorkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died in the Great War: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died in the Great War: Royal Garrison Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died in the Great War: Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Army Service Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Bedfordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Cameron Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Essex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Gordon Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Hampshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in action (1916-1916)

During the Great War the announcement page of The Times of London carried, after the Births, Marriages and Deaths, sections for Killed in Action and Died of Wounds. This is the index to the former for 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: King's Liverpool Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: King's Own Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: King's Royal Rifle Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Middlesex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Monmouthshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Norfolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Northamptonshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Northumberland Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Officers killed in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: West Surrey Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Royal Army Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Rifle Brigade (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Royal Scots Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Royal Sussex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: East Kent Regiment (The Buffs) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: Yeomanry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers killed in the Great War: York and Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Officers missing believed killed in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing believed killed in the Great War: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Officers missing believed wounded in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Essex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Hampshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Norfolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Northumberland Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Officers missing in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Rifle Brigade (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: The Black Watch (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers missing in the Great War: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Officers officially reported missing, unofficially reported prisoners of war (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers unofficially reported prisoners of war: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded and missing: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded and missing: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Officers wounded and missing in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Army Cyclist Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: The Black Watch (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Cameron Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Cavalry Special Reserve (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Dragoon Guards (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Essex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: East Surrey Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Gloucestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Gordon Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Highland Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Household Cavalry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: King's Liverpool Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Yorkshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: King's Royal Rifle Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Lancers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Leinster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Middlesex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Monmouthshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Norfolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Northumberland Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Officers wounded in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: West Surrey Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Army Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Berkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Dublin Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Garrison Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Rifle Brigade (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Inniskilling Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Irish Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Irish Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Munster Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Scots (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Seaforth Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Cameron Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Connaught Rangers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Dragoons (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: King's Royal Rifle Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Leinster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Monmouth Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Norfolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Northumberland Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Army Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Berkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Dublin Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Irish Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Munster Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: Suffolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: East Kent Regiment (The Buffs) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded by shell shock in the Great War: York & Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: East Kent Regiment (The Buffs) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Welsh Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Worcestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: York & Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 1 August 1916. The sample scan is taken from a section of the Roll of Honour for the Manchester Regiment.
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Soldiers died in the Great War: New Zealand Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Naval officers died of injuries (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Officers died of wounds (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Cheshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Devonshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Durham Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Hampshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: The King's (Liverpool Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Lincolnshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Monmouthshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: New Zealand Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Welsh Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: South African Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: South Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Somersetshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: South Wales Borderers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: York and Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Yorkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Cheshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Durham Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed in action (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: King's Own (Liverpool Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Naval officers killed (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: New Zealand Mounted Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Officers killed (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Royal Welsh Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: South African Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: South Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: South Wales Borderers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Welsh Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: York and Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Yorkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Officers missing believed killed (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers missing: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers missing: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Officers missing (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers missing: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: King's Own Scottish Borderers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Cheshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Gordon Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Highland Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Leinster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Middlesex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Norfolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Northamptonshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Northumberland Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Royal Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Royal Irish Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Royal Munster Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Royal Scots Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Royal Sussex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Shropshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: Suffolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers (previously reported missing) killed: The Buffs: East Kent Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Lightly wounded naval officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Officers wounded and missing (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Cheshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Devonshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Durham Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Hampshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: King's Own Liverpool Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Lincolnshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Naval officers wounded (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: New Zealand Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: New Zealand Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: New Zealand Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: New Zealand Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Officers wounded (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Royal Welsh Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: South African Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: South African Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: South Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Somerset Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded with shell shock: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded with shell shock: Cheshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded with shell shock: Durham Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded with shell shock: King's Own Liverpool Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded with shell shock: Lincolnshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded with shell shock: North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded with shell shock: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded with shell shock: South Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded with shell shock: Somerset Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: South Welsh Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: South Wales Borderers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Welsh Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: York and Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: West Yorkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Army Service Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Australian officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Bedfordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Essex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Highland Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Royal Army officers died of wounds (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Army Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Garrison Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers died of wounds: Inniskilling Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: West Yorkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died of wounds: York and Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers died: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers killed: Army Service Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers killed: Australian officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers killed: Cambridge Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Canadian officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Gordon Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Highland Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed in action (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Together with this were private announcements under the title 'Killed in Action'. This is the Killed in Action list published in The Times of 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: King's African Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: King's Own Scottish Borderers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Army officers killed (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Royal Army Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers killed: Royal Scots Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Officers missing: Australian Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers missing believed killed: King's Royal Rifle Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Army officers missing believed killed (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers missing: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers missing: KIng's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers missing now rejoined: Irish Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Army officers missing (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Naval officers missing presumed killed (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers previously reported wounded, not wounded: Royal Garrison Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Prisoners of war: Australian officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Naval officers seriously injured (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Naval officers slightly injured (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded and missing: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded and not missing: Irish Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Army Ordnance Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Australian officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Bedfordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Black Watch (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Cambridge Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Canadian officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell concussion: King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Devonshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Durham Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Essex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916. d
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Soldiers wounded: Highland Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: King's African Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: King's Own Scottish Borderers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Lincolnshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Middlesex Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: New Zealand officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Army officers wounded (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Army Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Dublin Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Garrison Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Horse Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Scots (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Scots Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: South African officers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: Seaforth Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell shock: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell shock: Durham Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell shock: King's Liverpool Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell shock: King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell shock: London Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell shock: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell shock: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded: shell shock: Royal Scots Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: shell shock: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: shell shock: West Yorkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Worcestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: West Yorkshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: York and Lancaster Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded: Yorkshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 3 August 1916.
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Australian Infantrymen Killed by Accident (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers of the Norfolk Regiment Killed by Accident (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers of the Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Killed by Accident (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers of the Kent Yeomanry Killed by Accident (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Army Ordnance Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Army Service Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Army Veterinary Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Deaths in the Great War: Australian Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Australian Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Australian Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Bedfordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Cheshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Deaths in the Great War: Connaught Rangers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Devonshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: East Surrey Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Honourable Artillery Company of London (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Hampshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Highland Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Deaths in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Deaths in the Great War: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Norfolk Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Deaths in the Great War: Duke of Wellington's Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Australian Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: Australian Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Australian Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Black Watch (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Connaught Rangers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: The King's (Liverpool Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Leicestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Lincolnshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: New Zealand Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: South African Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: Royal Army Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: Royal Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: Royal Field Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: Royal Garrison Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died of Wounds in the Great War: Royal Irish Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Royal Irish Rifles (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Royal Irish Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Royal Welsh Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Royal West Kent Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: South African Departmental Unit (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died in the Great War: South African Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Seaforth Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Somersetshire Light Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: South Wales Borderers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: The Black Watch (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died in the Great War: Welsh Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died in the Great War: Worcestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Died in the Great War: Yeomanry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: Australian Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: The Black Watch (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: Dorsetshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: Indian Army (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Killed in the Great War: The King's (Liverpool Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Killed in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Killed in the Great War: Newfoundland Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Killed in the Great War: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: New Zealand Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Killed in the Great War: South African Mounted Troops (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Killed in the Great War: Seaforth Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Killed in the Great War: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Killed in the Great War: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers missing in the Great War: Army Service Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers missing in the Great War: Australian Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers missing in the Great War: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers missing in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers missing in the Great War: Newfoundland Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers missing in the Great War: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers missing in the Great War: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers taken prisoner in the Great War: Australian Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Missing soldiers found again in the Great War: Connaught Rangers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Missing soldiers found again in the Great War: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Missing soldiers found again in the Great War: Royal Dublin Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers misreported wounded in the Great War: New Zealand Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded and missing in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded and missing in the Great War: Royal Irish Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded and missing in the Great War: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded and missing in the Great War: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Australian Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Australian Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Australian Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Border Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: The King's (Liverpool Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Leicestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Lincolnshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Maori Contingent (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: New Zealand Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: New Zealand Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: New Zealand Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: New Zealand Pioneer Battalion (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Royal Irish Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: South African Artillery (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: South African Engineers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: South African Infantry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: South African Medical Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Seaforth Highlanders (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: East Lancashire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: The King's (Liverpool Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
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Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: Lancashire Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: Leicestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: Lincolnshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: Machine Gun Corps (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: Manchester Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: North Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: Royal Welsh Fusiliers (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers shell shocked in the Great War: Sherwood Foresters (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: South Staffordshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Wiltshire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Worcestershire Regiment (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers wounded in the Great War: Yeomanry (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 4 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Died of Wounds in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. In addition there was a section of privately-placed notices; these are those published in The Times of 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Australian Officers Died of Wounds in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Officers Died of Wounds in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Australian Officers Killed in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Canadian Officers Killed in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Soldiers Killed in Action in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. In addition there was a section of privately-placed notices; these are those published in The Times of 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Officers Killed in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

South African Officers Killed in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Australian Officers Missing in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Officers Missing in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Officers Wounded and Missing in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Australian Officers Wounded in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Canadian Officers Wounded in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
>> Search this source

Officers Wounded in the Great War (1916-1916)

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 5 August 1916.
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Boys entering Aldenham School (1916-1916)

Aldenham School in Hertfordshire is a public school originating as an Elizabethan grammar school. The Aldenham School Register was first published in 1898, but this tenth edition, by R. J. Evans, and published in 1969, comprised only living old boys who had entered the school from 1900 onwards, together with those who had entered the school before 1900 and who had responded to a questionnaire. There is thus a general presumption that all the boys