Sources 1780-1789

Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)

Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Apprenticeship (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by apprenticeship.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Birth (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by birth.
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Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to all the stray names in the records: the wives and father-in-laws by whom freedom was acquired; the masters of apprentices; and other persons mentioned by the way in the record.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Gift (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by gift.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by marriage.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by redemption.
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Tradesmen of Chester (1392-1805)

Lists of admissions of freemen of the city of Chester from the earliest surviving records to 1805 were compiled by J. H. E. Bennett and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society from 1906. These lists were extracted from the mayoral yearbooks (dating back to 1392) and twelve freemen's rolls covering 1538 to 1612 and 1636 to 1805; and a list of admissions for 1505-1506 in Harleian MS 2105 (British Library). The record does not become more or less continuous until about 1490: in all, 12,426 freedoms are recorded. Freedom of the city, necessary to practise a trade in the city, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); or by order of assembly. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B, freedom taken up by right of birth; I, freedom taken up by right of indenture; M. B., Mayor's Book; *, freedom granted by order of assembly.
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Merchants and traders in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1515-1898)

The society of Merchant Adventurers of Newcastle-upon-Tyne consisted of those who had obtained freedom of the city (allowing them to trade there) by birth as a son of, or apprenticeship, to a freeman: and within that, freedom of one of the three 'trades', i. e. boothman, draper or mercer. F. W. Dendy prepared extracts from the merchant adventurers' records, the second volume, published by the Surtees Society in 1899 containing extracts from the minute books relating to the history of the merchants' court, an account of the long-standing dispute between the Newcastle company and the London company, some extracts relating to the relations between the Newcastle company and the Eastland Company (who had a monopoly of the trade with Russia and the Baltic), copies of the oaths used by the Newcastle company, the London company and the Eastland Company, and (pages 185 to 381) a list of the apprentices enrolled in, and of the freemen admitted to, the Newcastle company. This list is arranged in a table of seven columns: Name of Apprentice; Name of Father of Apprentice and Observations (particularly, instances where an apprentice is passed over to a new master during his apprenticeship); Master; Boothman (B.), Draper (D.) or Mercer (M.); Date of Indentures: Enrolment: Admission. All the dates are normalised to New Style, i. e. to the modern calendar. Finally, there is a list of sons and apprentices of members who, having thus acquired the right of freedom of the city, took up the freedom, but did not assume the freedom of any of the three trades. The index covers all the contents of the volume, not just the apprentice and freemen lists.
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Inhabitants of Preston in Lancashire (1653-1813)

The records of the three main courts of the borough - the Court Leet, the Mayor's Court and the Inquest or Inquisition of Office - were entered in three thick folio volumes in the municipal archives. Extracts from these, by Anthony Hewitson, a local historian, were published in the Preston Guardian from 16 November 1901 to 19 September 1903, and then revised and printed in this volume in 1905. These extracts necessarily dwell on the quaint and curious, and are mainly from the 17th and early 18th century.
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Inhabitants of Stichill in Roxburghshire and Berwickshire (1655-1807)

The minute book of the baron court of the parish of Stichill (Stitchill or Stichell) was transcribed by the Reverend George Gunn, rector of Stitchill and Hume, edited by Clement B. Gunn and printed by the Scottish Record Society in 1905. The court had jurisdiction throughout the baron over most matters of civil and criminal law, and the minutes of the court deal with personal disputes and the administration of the barony.
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Sackville papers (1685-1799)

R. B. Knowles of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Mrs Stopford-Sackville to examine her family papers at Drayton House in Northamptonshire; and after his death the work was continued by W. O. Hewlett and published in 1904. These were chiefly letters, reports and other official documents from and to lord George Sackville, the third son of Lionel first duke of Dorset. The papers edited in this volume relate to the Monmouth insurrection 1685-1686; letters of Mary princess of Orange to lady Mary Forester; Sackville family papers and letters 1706-1799; home affairs 1755-1784; letters from lord George to General Irwin 1761-1784; Ireland 1731-1783; the war of the Austrian Succession 1743-1748; Cherbourgh and St Malo 1758; the Seven Years War 1758-1759; Minden 1759-1760; Spain 1778-1780; prince William Henry duke of Gloucester 1771-1779; India 1776-1784; and Minorca 1776-1782.
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Hertfordshire Sessions (1699-1850)

Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Rolls. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county, with presentments, petitions, and recognizances to appear as witnesses: many of the records concern the county authorities dealing with regulation of alehouses, religious conventicles, absence from church, highways, poaching, profanation of the Sabbath, exercising trades without due apprenticeship &c. Unlike the Sessions Books, the decisions of the justices are not recorded on the rolls, which serve more as a record of evidence and allegations. This is a calendar of abstracts of extracts: it is by no means a completely comprehensive record of the surviving Hertfordshire sessions rolls of the period, but coverage is good.
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Hastings and Rawdon family correspondence (1724-1817)

John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, of which this is the third volume, published in 1934, Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work being completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley. This volume covers two categories of the records: correspondence of the Hastings and Rawdon family 1724 to 1815; and letters of Warren Hastings, of Daylesford House, Worcestershire, to general Charles Hastings, afterwards sir Charles Hastings, bart.
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Memoirs and correspondence of the 1st Earl of Charlemont (1745-1783)

James Caulfeild, first Earl of Charlemont, worked for the emancipation of Ireland from the control of the parliament of England, and was commander-in-chief of the Ulster Volunteers. Here are his political memoirs, a calendar of his correspondence, and copies of many letters in full.
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Hertfordshire gamekeepers (1752-1798)

Highly condensed abstracts of Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935. Appendix VII is a list of gamekeepers registered under the various acts of parliament regulating the keeping and hunting of game. The gamekeeper's full name (surname first) is given; the manor on which he was responsible for preserving game; the name of the lord of the manor; the date of entry and the dates of the game certificates (e. g., 84 for 1784; 85-88 for 1785-1788).
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Hertfordshire Justices of the Peace (1752-1799)

Highly condensed abstracts of Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935. Appendix IA is a list of justices of the peace for the county mentioned in the records for the period. In each case there is just the full name of the justice and the years in which he is recorded.
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Hertfordshire Sessions (1752-1799)

Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county: numerically, the most cases (362) concerned assaults and rioting, and larceny (378), but there is a large variety of other matter, as extensive as the jurisdiction of the courts. These highly condensed abstracts of the entries were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935.
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Graduates of Cambridge University (1760-1846)

Joseph Romilly, registrar of the university of Cambridge, compiled Graduati Cantabrigienses, a catalogue of graduates from the academic year of admissions 1760 through to 10 October 1846. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname, and then chronologically by christian name: the college is given, with an asterisk in those cases where the man became a fellow, and then, in chronological order, his degrees.
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Hertfordshire Communicants (1761-1795)

Highly condensed abstracts of Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935. Appendix V is a list of Sacrament Certificates: under the Test Act of 1673, holders of public offices were required to produce a certificate that they had taken communion in a parish church. For each such communicant the list gives full name (surname first); date of taking communion; name of the church; name of the minister; name of the churchwarden(s); and names of two witnesses.
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Boys entering Sedbergh School (1770-1782)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
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Manners family correspondence (1771-1787)

Volumes 26 to 36 of the letters and papers of the Manners family of Belvoir consist largely of the correspondence of lord Robert Manners, naval captain, and his brother Charles marquess of Gransby, subsequently 4th duke of Rutland, who served for a period as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. This printed report dwells mainly on the political rather than domestic content of the manuscripts.
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Soldiers, administrators, refugees and merchants in America (1779-1782)

These are the headquarters papers of sir Henry Clinton, British commander-in-chief during the American war of independence. Many of the individuals recorded were part of the British military administration, but others are refugees and merchants whose lives had been disrupted by the conflict. These records are from August 1779 to June 1782.
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Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1780-1780)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1780-1780)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1780-1780)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1780-1780)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1780-1780)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Hertfordshire noblemen, gentlemen, clergy and freeholders (1780-1780)

Highly condensed abstracts of Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935. Appendix III is a list of signatories to a protest against a petition to Parliament: the start of the preamble to the protest is shown in the sample scan.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1780-1780)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1780-1780)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Clerks and apprentices (1780-1780)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 January to 30 December 1780. IR 1/30
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Masters of clerks and apprentices (1780-1780)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 January to 30 December 1780. IR 1/30
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Boys entering Rugby School (1780-1780)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Gravestones of Servants: Worcestershire (1780-1780)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1780-1780)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1780-1780)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1780-1780)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1780-1780)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Witnesses to Marriages (1780-1780)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Inhabitants of the City of London (1780-1780)

In August 1780 this loyal petition was made to king George III, subscribed by 2800 'Liverymen, Freemen, and Others, Inhabitants of the City of London', expressing grateful thanks 'for that Protection, which, by the Wisdom, Vigilance, and Activity of your Majesty in Council, was so seasonably given to us, at a Time when our Lives, Property, and every Thing dear to us, were in such imminent Danger, from the Violence of the most outrageous Banditti that ever existed.' This refers to the Gordon Riots, caused by a bill which Parliament introduced in 1778 to repeal certain harsh laws against Roman Catholics: in June 1780 a mob protesting against this repeal assembled in London, forced its way into the House of Commons, attacked Newgate prison releasing many prisoners, and destroyed a great deal of property, until dispersed by the military.
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City of Westminster Voters (1780-1780)

The poll for the election of two citizens to serve in Parliament for the City and Liberty of Westminster was begun 7 September and ended 23 September 1780, the candidates being the Hon. Charles James Fox (F), Sir George Brydges Rodney, bart. (R), and the Right Hon. Thomas Pelham Clinton the Earl of Lincoln (L). In this poll book the names of all voters are given, by parish and within each parish by street, arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name, with the individual votes cast shown in the right hand columns. Pages 1 to 48 cover the parish of St George, Hanover Square; 49 to 100, St Martin; 101 to 134, St Clement and St Mary le Strand; 135 to 155, St Ann, Soho; 157 to 166, St Paul, Covent Garden; 167 to 170, St Martin le Grand; 171 to 224, St James; 225 to 274, St Margaret and St John.
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British officer prisoners (1780-1781)

Sir Henry Clinton at New York 24 January 1781 transmitted to lord George Germain (one of king George III's Principal Secretaries of State) this list of British officers, prisoners with the Americans, exchanged since 25 October 1780. The names are arranged by rank, and then by regiment.
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Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1781-1781)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1781-1781)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1781-1781)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1781-1781)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1781-1781)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1781-1781)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sherborne School (1781-1781)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1781-1781)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Clerks and apprentices (1781-1781)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 15 January 1781. IR 1/30
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Masters of clerks and apprentices (1781-1781)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 15 January 1781. IR 1/30
>> Search this source

Clerks and apprentices (1781-1781)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 16 January to 31 December 1781. IR 1/31
>> Search this source

Masters of clerks and apprentices (1781-1781)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 16 January to 31 December 1781. IR 1/31
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1781-1781)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Gravestones of Servants: Middlesex (1781-1781)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Oxfordshire (1781-1781)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1781-1781)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1781-1781)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1781-1781)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1781-1781)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Witnesses to Marriages (1781-1781)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1782-1782)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Officers of the Volunteers in Munster (1782-1782)

Officers of the volunteer army of Munster (counties Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford) arranged by corps.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1782-1782)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1782-1782)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1782-1782)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1782-1782)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sherborne School (1782-1782)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1782-1782)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
>> Search this source

Clerks and apprentices (1782-1782)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1782. IR 1/31
>> Search this source

Masters of clerks and apprentices (1782-1782)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1782. IR 1/31
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1782-1782)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Kent (1782-1782)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Northamptonshire (1782-1782)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Surrey (1782-1782)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1782-1782)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1782-1782)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1782-1782)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1782-1782)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Witnesses to Marriages (1782-1782)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Soldiers, administrators, refugees and merchants in America (1782-1783)

These are the headquarters papers of sir Guy Carleton, British commander-in-chief during the American war of independence. Many of the individuals recorded were part of the British military administration, but others are refugees and merchants whose lives had been disrupted by the conflict. These records cover July 1782 to March 1783.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sedbergh School (1782-1799)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
>> Search this source

Soldiers, administrators, refugees and merchants in America (1783-1783)

These are the headquarters papers of sir Guy Carleton, British commander-in-chief at the end of the American war of independence. Many of the individuals recorded were part of the British military administration, but others are refugees and merchants whose lives had been disrupted by the conflict. These records cover April to December 1783.
>> Search this source

Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1783-1783)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Baptisms (1783-1783)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1783-1783)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1783-1783)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. 'P.' or 'Paup.' indicates the burial of a pauper.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1783-1783)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sherborne School (1783-1783)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1783-1783)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Clerks and apprentices (1783-1783)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 21 June 1783. IR 1/31
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Masters of clerks and apprentices (1783-1783)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 21 June 1783. IR 1/31
>> Search this source

Clerks and apprentices (1783-1783)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 23 June to 31 December 1783. IR 1/32
>> Search this source

Masters of clerks and apprentices (1783-1783)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 23 June to 31 December 1783. IR 1/32
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Boys entering Rugby School (1783-1783)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Gravestones of Servants: Middlesex (1783-1783)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1783-1783)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1783-1783)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1783-1783)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1783-1783)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Witnesses to Marriages (1783-1783)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1784-1784)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1784-1784)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1784-1784)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1784-1784)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. 'P.' or 'Paup.' indicates the burial of a pauper.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1784-1784)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sherborne School (1784-1784)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
>> Search this source

Clerks and apprentices (1784-1784)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1784. IR 1/32
>> Search this source

Masters of clerks and apprentices (1784-1784)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1784. IR 1/32
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1784-1784)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Middlesex (1784-1784)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1784-1784)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1784-1784)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Customs Officer: Berwick on Tweed (1784-1784)

An account of the gross salaries, fees, allowances and gratuities received by the officers of the customs and their deputies at the Out Ports; by what authority they are appointed; with their payments for taxes, deputies, clerks and other contingent expenses.
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Correspondence of the 1st Earl of Charlemont (1784-1799)

James Caulfeild, first Earl of Charlemont, worked for the emancipation of Ireland from the control of the parliament of England, and was commander-in-chief of the Ulster Volunteers.
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Hertfordshire hunters (1784-1799)

Highly condensed abstracts of Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books were prepared by William le Hardy, and published for the County Council in 1935. An act of the 24th year of king George III instituted licences to kill game, which cost 10s 6d for registered gamekeepers, and 2 guineas for others. Appendix VIII is a list of persons granted two-guinea licences for killing game: in each case the full name (surname first) is given; occupation; residence; and the years during which licences were purchased (e. g., 92-93 for 1791 to 1793).
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Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1785-1785)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
>> Search this source

Births (1785-1785)

Birth notices from the Daily Universal Register of April 1785.
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Deaths (1785-1785)

Death notices from the Daily Universal Register of April 1785.
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Proceedings in the English courts (1785-1785)

Law reports from the Daily Universal Register for April 1785.
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Marriages (1785-1785)

Marriage notices from the Daily Universal Register for April 1785.
>> Search this source

Proceedings at the Old Bailey (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register for April 1785 reported desultorily on activity at the Old Bailey and at Newgate prison, sometimes under the title 'Old Bailey Intelligence'. Persons mentioned include not only the accused, but also victims, police officers, witnesses, &c.
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Masters of Merchantmen (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of April 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Plymouth, Whitby, Cowes, Falmouth, Bristol and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Creek(e), in the Downs, off the Lizard, off Scilly, off the Start, in Studland Bay, off Whitby, off the Wight, at Aberdeen, Alicante, Ancona, Antigua, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Barcelona, Bayonne, Belfast, Bombay, Bonny, Bordeaux, Brighthelmstone (Brighton), Bristol, Cadiz, Carlingford, Cartagena, Charlestown, Cork, Cowes, Cuxhaven, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Dunkirk, Falmouth, Galway, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guernsey, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Hamburg, Havre de Grace, Hull, Jersey, Kinsale, Lancaster, Leghorn, Limerick, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, Lochryan, Malaga, Marseilles, Montserrat, Nantes, New Providence (Bahamas), New York, Newry, Oporto, Ostend, Penzance, Plymouth, Poole, Portsmouth, Rotterdam, St Eustatia, St John's, St Kitts, St Vincents, Scarborough, Scilly, Seville, Southampton, Stangate Creek, Tenerife, Texel, Tobago, Venice, Waterford, Weymouth, Whitehaven, and in 'Africa', Georgia, Jamaica, Maryland, North Carolina, Philadelphia, South Carolina and Virginia; and Coast Lists made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.
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Valetudinarians (and the fashionable) at Bath (1785-1785)

The spa at Bath was a cynosure both for those wishing to take the waters, and for fashionable society seeking a little recreation. Lists of arrivals at Bath were printed in the Country News section of the Daily Universal Register, generally speaking arranged in order of social precedence, headed by lords and ladies, and ending with unmarried women without title. The nobility lent these lists considerable cachet, and so may seem to 'arrive' more than once on a visit. These are the lists for February 1785
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Births (1785-1785)

Birth notices from the Daily Universal Register of February 1785.
>> Search this source

Deaths (1785-1785)

Death notices from the Daily Universal Register of February 1785.
>> Search this source

Proceedings at London Guildhall (1785-1785)

Some activity at the Guildhall of the City of London is reported in the Daily Universal Register of February 1785: this relates mainly to attempts at electoral reform.
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Plaintiffs and defendants (1785-1785)

The Law Reports in the Daily Universal Register of February 1785 describe proceedings before Lord Mansfield.
>> Search this source

Marriages (1785-1785)

Marriage notices from the Daily Universal Register for February 1785.
>> Search this source

Proceedings at the Old Bailey (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register for February 1785 reported on cases tried at the Old Bailey. Persons mentioned include not only the accused, but also victims, police officers, witnesses, &c.
>> Search this source

Masters of Merchantmen (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of February 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Milford, Poole, Standgate Creek and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Downs, off Beachy Head, off Dover, off Poole, at Alicante, Amsterdam, Ancona, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Belfast, Bilbao, Bordeaux, Boston (New England), Bristol, Bryar, Cadiz, Campvere, Charlestown, Cork, Cowes, Creek, Cuxhaven, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Dunkirk, Falmouth, Faro, Gibraltar, Glendore, Grenada, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Havre de Grace, Helvoetsluys, Hull, Kinsale, Lancaster, Leghorn, Leith, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, Lough Ryan, Margate, Milford, Mogador, Naples, New York, Newcastle (on Tyne), Newry, Ostend, Penzance, Philadelphia, Plymouth, Poole, Portsmouth, Rotterdam, St Domingo, St Kitts, St Lucar, St Lucia, St Marks, Scilly, Sealock, Smyrna, Standgate Creek, Tenerife, Texel, Waterford, Zeirickser, and in 'Africa', the Isles de Lo's, Jamaica, North Carolina and Virginia; and Reports of Ships made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1785-1785)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
>> Search this source

Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1785-1785)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
>> Search this source

Valetudinarians (and the fashionable) at Bath (1785-1785)

The spa at Bath was a cynosure both for those wishing to take the waters, and for fashionable society seeking a little recreation. Lists of arrivals at Bath were printed in the Country News section of the Daily Universal Register for January 1785, generally speaking arranged in order of social precedence, headed by lords and ladies, and ending with unmarried women without title. The nobility lent these lists considerable cachet, and so may seem to 'arrive' more than once on a visit.
>> Search this source

Births (1785-1785)

Birth notices from the Daily Universal Register of January 1785.
>> Search this source

Deaths (1785-1785)

Death notices from the Daily Universal Register of January 1785.
>> Search this source

Proceedings at London Guildhall (1785-1785)

Some activity at the Guildhall of the City of London is reported in the Daily Universal Register of January 1785: this relates partly to bankruptcy proceedings, and partly to minor criminal activity.
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Directors of the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce and Manufactures (1785-1785)

A report in the Daily Universal Register lists the new directors of Glasgow Chamber of Commerce, appointed on 11 January 1785.
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Marriages (1785-1785)

Marriage notices from the Daily Universal Register for January 1785.
>> Search this source

Proceedings at the Old Bailey (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register for January 1785 reported desultorily on activity at the Old Bailey and at Newgate prison, sometimes under the title 'Old Bailey Intelligence'. Persons mentioned include not only the accused, but also victims, police officers, witnesses, &c.
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Masters of Merchantmen (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of January 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Poole and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Downs, in the Humber, in Bantry Bay, off Beachy Head, off Beer Haven, off Cape Clear, off Cape Fear, off Hastings, off Hilston, off Portland, off Porto Bar, off Scilly, at Alicante, Ancona, Antigua, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Belfast, Bilbao, Bonny, Bordeaux, Boulogne, Bremen, Brighthelmstone (Brighton), Bristol, Cadiz, Cape Breton, Cartagena, Charlestown, Chester, Constantinople, Cork, Corunna, Cowes, Creek, Crookhaven, Dantzig, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Exeter, Falmouth, Faro, Figuera, Genoa, Gibraltar, Gottenburg, Greenock, Grenada, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Havannah, Hoylake, Hull, Jersey, Killybegs, Lancaster, Leghorn, Leith, Limerick, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, L'Orient, Lowestoft, Madeira, Madras, Milford, Minorca, Mogador, Naples, New Calabar, New Providence (Bahamas), New York, Newry, Nice, Old Calabar, Oporto, Ostend, Peel, Penzance, Philadelphia, Piscatequa, Plymouth, Pondicherry, Port Roseway, Porto, Portsmouth, Rochelle, Ross, Rotterdam, St Kitts, St Lucia, St Michael, St Vincents, Savannah, Scarborough, Southampton, Tenerife, Texel, Tobago, Torbay, Vigo, Waterford, Whitehaven, and in 'Africa', Angola, Grenadoes, Honduras, the Isle of Wight, Jamaica, Maryland, New England, Newfoundland, Philadelphia and Virginia; and Reports of Ships made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1785-1785)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1785-1785)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1785-1785)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. 'P.' or 'Paup.' indicates the burial of a pauper.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1785-1785)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Victims of accidents (1785-1785)

Many street accidents, house fires, drownings, &c. were reported among the news items in the Daily Universal Register of London. This is the index to the names of those killed, injured, or losing house or business premises, reported in May 1785.
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Admirals of the British fleet (1785-1785)

Shipping news reported in the Daily Universal Register of London hardly ever named the captains of navy ships, but admirals are referred to occasionally, as in these instances in May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Africa (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Amsterdam (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Andros (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Antigua (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Authors (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register printed a monthly list of new books, together with reviews of some choicer items published the previous month. May 1785.
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Births (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried birth, marriage and death notices. In the birth notices the children's prospective christian names are never given: the mother is usually referred to as 'the lady of .....' May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Barbados (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Batavia (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Belfast (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Bengal (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Bilbao (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Bordeaux (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Boston, New England (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Bremen (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Bristol (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Cadiz (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at the Cape (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen casualties (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. Shipwrecks or other major losses were also reported, and this is the index to the captains of these ships. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Charlestown (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Christchurch (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen on the Clyde (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of coasters leaving the port of London (1785-1785)

The Custom House in the port of London posted daily lists of ships. The Coast List was in four parts - Colliers Entered Inwards; Coasters Entered Inwards; Coasters Entered Outwards (i. e., receiving cargo for a prospective voyage); and Coasters Cleared Outwards. Coasters cleared outwards are listed by name with the surname of the captain, and the name of the intended destination. These lists were printed in the Daily Universal Register. May 1785.
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Captains of coasters preparing to leave the port of London (1785-1785)

The Custom House in the port of London posted daily lists of ships. The Coast List was in four parts - Colliers Entered Inwards; Coasters Entered Inwards; Coasters Entered Outwards (i. e., receiving cargo for a prospective voyage); and Coasters Cleared Outwards. Coasters entered outwards are listed by name with the surname of the captain, the name of the intended destination, and the number of the wharf at which they were docked (1 Topping's Wharf, 2 Chamberlain's Wharf, 3 Cotton's Wharf, 4 Bridge Yard, 5 Hayes's Wharf, 6 Beal's Wharf, 7 Yoxall's Wharf, 8 Griffin's Wharf, 9 Gun and Shot Wharf, 10 Simmon's Wharf, 11 Stanton's Wharf and 12 Dobbyn's Wharf, all at Tooley Street, Southwark; 13 Three Cranes Wharf, 14 Red Lion Wharf and 15 Bell Wharf, all at Upper Thames Street, London; 16 Fresh Wharf, 17 Billingsgate Dock, 18 Smart's Key, 19 Dice Key, 20 Custom-House Key, 21 Wool Key and 22 Chester Key, all at Lower Thames Street, London; 23 Iron Gate Wharf, 24 Wheeler's Wharf and 25 Harrison's Wharf, all at St Catharine's, London; 26 Scotch Wharf, 27 Hawley's Wharf and 28 Hore's Wharf, all at Hermitage; 29 Dublin Chains, 30 Yarmouth Chains, 31 Tower Chains, 32 Parsons's Chains, 33 Pickle Herring Chains, 34 Horslydown Chains, 35 Hermitage Chains, 36 Old Rose Chains; 37 Iron Gate Stairs, 38 Union Stairs, 39 East Lane Stairs, 40 Pickle Herring Stairs, 41 Wapping Old Stairs, 42 Wapping New Stairs, 43 King Edward's Stairs, 44 New Crane Stairs, 45 King James's Stairs, 46 Pelican Stairs, 47 Shadwell Stairs, 48 Bell Wharf Stairs, and 49 Stone Stairs). These lists were printed in the Daily Universal Register. May 1785.
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Captains of coasters entering the port of London (1785-1785)

The Custom House in the port of London posted daily lists of ships. The Coast List was in four parts - Colliers Entered Inwards; Coasters Entered Inwards; Coasters Entered Outwards (i. e., receiving cargo for a prospective voyage); and Coasters Cleared Outwards. Coasters entered inwards are listed by name with the surname of the captain, the name of the port from which they had come, and the number of the wharf at which they were docked (1 Topping's Wharf, 2 Chamberlain's Wharf, 3 Cotton's Wharf, 4 Bridge Yard, 5 Hayes's Wharf, 6 Beal's Wharf, 7 Yoxall's Wharf, 8 Griffin's Wharf, 9 Gun and Shot Wharf, 10 Simmon's Wharf, 11 Stanton's Wharf and 12 Dobbyn's Wharf, all at Tooley Street, Southwark; 13 Three Cranes Wharf, 14 Red Lion Wharf and 15 Bell Wharf, all at Upper Thames Street, London; 16 Fresh Wharf, 17 Billingsgate Dock, 18 Smart's Key, 19 Dice Key, 20 Custom-House Key, 21 Wool Key and 22 Chester Key, all at Lower Thames Street, London; 23 Iron Gate Wharf, 24 Wheeler's Wharf and 25 Harrison's Wharf, all at St Catharine's, London; 26 Scotch Wharf, 27 Hawley's Wharf and 28 Hore's Wharf, all at Hermitage; 29 Dublin Chains, 30 Yarmouth Chains, 31 Tower Chains, 32 Parsons's Chains, 33 Pickle Herring Chains, 34 Horslydown Chains, 35 Hermitage Chains, 36 Old Rose Chains; 37 Iron Gate Stairs, 38 Union Stairs, 39 East Lane Stairs, 40 Pickle Herring Stairs, 41 Wapping Old Stairs, 42 Wapping New Stairs, 43 King Edward's Stairs, 44 New Crane Stairs, 45 King James's Stairs, 46 Pelican Stairs, 47 Shadwell Stairs, 48 Bell Wharf Stairs, and 49 Stone Stairs). These lists were printed in the Daily Universal Register. May 1785.
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Captains of colliers entering the port of London (1785-1785)

The Custom House in the port of London posted daily lists of ships. The Coast List was in four parts - Colliers Entered Inwards; Coasters Entered Inwards; Coasters Entered Outwards (i. e., receiving cargo for a prospective voyage); and Coasters Cleared Outwards. Colliers entered inwards are listed by name with the surname of the captain, and the number of the wharf (usually 46, Pelican Stairs, or 49, Stone Stairs). These lists were printed in the Daily Universal Register. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Constantinople (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Cork (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Corunna (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Cowes (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen in the Creek (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Criminals (1785-1785)

Criminals accused and/or convicted, reported in the Daily Universal Register of London. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at the Custom House (1785-1785)

The Custom House in the port of London posted daily lists of ships reporting in, giving ships' names, captains' names (surname and initial), and where they had arrived from. These lists were printed in the Daily Universal Register. May 1785.
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Deaths (1785-1785)

Death notices from the Daily Universal Register of London. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Dartmouth (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Deal (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Delaware (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Committee of delegates from the royal boroughs at Edinburgh (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register carried a letter from Edinburgh of 27 April 1785, describing a convention of delegates from the burgesses of the royal boroughs, appointing a standing committee for carrying the resolutions of convention into execution.
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Captains of merchantmen at Dominica (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Dover (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen in the Downs (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Dublin (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Dunkirk (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Elsinore (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Criminals hung (1785-1785)

Executions reported in the Daily Universal Register of London, May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Falmouth (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Georgia, America (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Gibraltar (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Glasgow (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Granada (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Gravesend (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Grenada (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Guernsey (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Hamburg (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Hull (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Commanders of Indiamen (1785-1785)

4 May 1785 the India House published a list of ships arrived from the several parts of India during the previous twelve months, giving the dates of the original sailings from the Downs (as far back as October 1781), the ships' names, commanders' surnames, dates of arriving back in the Downs, and from whence consigned. This index covers both the commanders in this list, and the captains of Indiamen mentioned in the general ship news in the Daily Universal Register of London for May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at the Isle of Wight (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Jamaica (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Jersey (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Kinsale (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Koningsburgh (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Lancaster (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Mentioned in law reports (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried law reports, in which not only the litigants, lawyers and justices are mentioned, but also a variety of individuals whose names crop up in the cases for one reason or another. May 1785.
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Lawyers (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried law reports (and general news) in which both attorneys and judges are mentioned, and their names are indexed here. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Leghorn (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Leith (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Limerick (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Lisbon (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Plaintiffs and defendants (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried law reports in which prominent legal cases of the day were described. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Liverpool (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Londonderry (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at L'Orient (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Brides and grooms (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried marriage notices among the general news of the day. May 1785
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Captains of merchantmen at Madeira (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Majumba (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Margate (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Marseilles (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Martinico (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Maryland (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Members of Parliament (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London printed a list of members of parliament voting with Pitt in his motion for a parliamentary reform 18 April 1785, and those voting against (as well as those paired off).
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Captains of merchantmen at Naples (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Newry (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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People in the news (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried reports of events in the capital and further afield, and those for May 1785 are indexed here.
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Captains of merchantmen at New York (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Captains of merchantmen at Nice (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Captains of merchantmen at North Carolina (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at North Shields (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Old Calabar (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Oporto (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Ostend (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Peterhead (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Philadelphia (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Plymouth (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Poole (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Portsmouth (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Painters exhibiting at the Royal Academy (1785-1785)

From 29 April 1785 the Daily Universal Register of London ran a review of the new exhibition of the Royal Academy at Somerset House. The comments on the pictures are brief and often unflattering; nor are the artists always named; the pictures are referred to by their catalogue numbers. This is the index to the artists.
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Captains of merchantmen at Ramsgate (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Riga (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen in the River (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Rotterdam (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Savannah (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Scarborough (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Sitters for portraits exhibited at the Royal Academy (1785-1785)

From 29 April 1785 the Daily Universal Register of London ran a review of the new exhibition of the Royal Academy at Somerset House. The comments on the pictures are brief and often unflattering; nor are the artists always named; the pictures are referred to by their catalogue numbers. Jocular venom could not so lightly be included in descriptions of portraits of named individuals. This is the index to those sitters.
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Captains of merchantmen at Southampton (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at St Kitts (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at St Ubes (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at St Vincents (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Tobago (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Tortola (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Captains of merchantmen at Totnes (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Convicts transported (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London, in reporting sentences on convicted criminals, included these orders for transportation. May 1785
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Captains of merchantmen at Trinidada (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
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Captains of merchantmen at Venice (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Victims of crime (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried many reports of crimes both as immediate news and in reports of cases in the courts, including the Old Bailey. This is the index to the victims of the crimes. May 1785
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Captains of merchantmen at Virginia (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Captains of merchantmen at Waterford (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Captains of merchantmen at Weymouth (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Captains of merchantmen at Whitby (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Captains of merchantmen at Wilmington (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Witnesses in court cases (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried law reports, in which these witnesses appeared. May 1785
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Captains of merchantmen at Yarmouth (1785-1785)

The Daily Universal Register of London carried detailed lists of shipping news from ports around the world - arrivals, departures, ships in port, ships spoken to in passage - mostly, but not entirely, relating to British merchantmen. May 1785.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sherborne School (1785-1785)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Subscribers to Ann Yearsley's Poems on Several Occasions (1785-1785)

This book of poetry by 'Ann Yearsley, a Milkwoman of Bristol', received great critical acclaim and was rapidly reprinted. The third edition included these subscription lists for the first two editions.
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Clerks and apprentices (1785-1785)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1785. IR 1/32
>> Search this source

Masters of clerks and apprentices (1785-1785)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1785. IR 1/32
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1785-1785)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Gloucestershire (1785-1785)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Oxfordshire (1785-1785)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1785-1785)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1785-1785)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1785-1785)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1785-1785)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Witnesses to Marriages (1785-1785)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1786-1786)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1786-1786)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1786-1786)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1786-1786)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. 'P.' or 'Paup.' indicates the burial of a pauper.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1786-1786)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers from 1754 onwards not only give the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom, but also the condition (bachelor, spinster, widow or widower) of both parties. It was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1786-1786)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Clerks and apprentices (1786-1786)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 10 February 1786. IR 1/32
>> Search this source

Masters of clerks and apprentices (1786-1786)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 10 February 1786. IR 1/32
>> Search this source

Clerks and apprentices (1786-1786)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 10 February to 31 December 1786. IR 1/33
>> Search this source

Masters of clerks and apprentices (1786-1786)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 10 February to 31 December 1786. IR 1/33
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1786-1786)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Buckinghamshire (1786-1786)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Essex (1786-1786)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Gloucestershire (1786-1786)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1786-1786)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1786-1786)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Bankrupts (1786-1806)

William Smith's abstracts of bankrupts, dividends and certificates for England and Wales from 1786 to June 1806. Bankruptcy causes abrupt changes in people's lives, and is often the reason for someone appearing suddenly in a different location or in a different occupation.
>> Search this source

Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1787-1787)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1787-1787)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
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Wandsworth Burials (1787-1787)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. From 1760 onwards the burial registers contain date of burial, and full name; for the burial of children, the parents' names are only occasionally stated, just the word 'inf.' for infant; for the burial of wives, the husband's name; ages are given for adults. Extra details such as date or cause of death, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. 'P.' or 'Paup.' indicates the burial of a pauper.
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Clerks and apprentices (1787-1787)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1787. IR 1/33
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Masters of clerks and apprentices (1787-1787)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1787. IR 1/33
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Boys entering Rugby School (1787-1787)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Gravestones of Servants: Gloucestershire (1787-1787)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Gravestones of Servants: Warwickshire (1787-1787)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Gravestones of Servants: Worcestershire (1787-1787)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1787-1787)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1787-1787)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1787-1787)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1787-1787)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Witnesses to Marriages (1787-1787)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Convicts sent to New South Wales (1787-1787)

'The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay, with a Account of the Establishment of the Colonies of Port Jackson and Norfolk Island: compiled from Authentic Papers' included as an appendix this list of convicts sent to New South Wales in 1787: giving full name (surname first), where convicted, date of conviction, and length of sentence.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Bacup (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Blackburn (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Bolton (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Burnley (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Bury (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Haslingden (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Kirkham (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Lancaster (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Leigh, Lancashire (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Liverpool (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Manchester (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Ormskirk (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Prescot (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Preston (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Rochdale (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Rossendale (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Ulverston (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Warrington (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston, Warrington and Wigan.
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Merchants and Manufacturers in Wigan (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston, Warrington and Wigan.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Burton-upon-Trent (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Cheadle (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Leek (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Lichfield (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Newcastle-under-Lyme (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Pottery Manufacturers: Burslem (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Pottery Manufacturers: Cobridge (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Pottery Manufacturers: Fenton (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Pottery Manufacturers: Hanley (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Pottery Manufacturers: Lane End (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Pottery Manufacturers: Shelton (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Pottery Manufacturers: Stoke (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Rugeley (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Stafford (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Stone (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Walsall (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
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Staffordshire Merchants: Wolverhampton (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.
>> Search this source

Cheshire Merchants: Chester (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Cheshire, there are lists of traders in Chester, Congleton, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Northwich, and Stockport and neighbourhood.
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Cheshire Merchants: Congleton (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Cheshire, there are lists of traders in Chester, Congleton, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Northwich, and Stockport and neighbourhood.
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Cheshire Merchants: Knutsford (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Cheshire, there are lists of traders in Chester, Congleton, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Northwich, and Stockport and neighbourhood.
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Cheshire Merchants: Macclesfield (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Cheshire, there are lists of traders in Chester, Congleton, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Northwich, and Stockport and neighbourhood.
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Cheshire Merchants: Middlewich (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Cheshire, there are lists of traders in Chester, Congleton, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Northwich, and Stockport and neighbourhood.
>> Search this source

Cheshire Merchants: Nantwich (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Cheshire, there are lists of traders in Chester, Congleton, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Northwich, and Stockport and neighbourhood.
>> Search this source

Cheshire Merchants: Northwich (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Cheshire, there are lists of traders in Chester, Congleton, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Northwich, and Stockport and neighbourhood.
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Cheshire Merchants: Stockport and Neighbourhood (1787-1787)

William Tunnicliff's 'Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster' included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Cheshire, there are lists of traders in Chester, Congleton, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Northwich, and Stockport and neighbourhood.
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Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1788-1788)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1788-1788)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1775 to 1788 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, as well as date of birth.
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Births (1788-1788)

Births of children to the nobility recorded in the Annual Register for 1788.
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People in the News (1788-1788)

The Annual Register for 1788 contained a section entitled 'Chronicle', summarizing the year's major events in London, Britain and abroad: and to this was added an appendix containing the texts of interesting dispatches from correspondents.
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Deaths (1788-1788)

Deaths of the nobility and gentry recorded in the Annual Register for 1788.
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Marriages (1788-1788)

Marriages of the nobility recorded in the Annual Register for 1788.
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Promotions (1788-1788)

Civil, ecclesiastical, court, military and naval preferments and promotions recorded in the Annual Register for 1788.
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Sheriffs of England and Wales (1788-1788)

A list of sheriffs, county by county, recorded in the Annual Register for 1788.
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Clerks and apprentices (1788-1788)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 23 August 1788. IR 1/33
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Masters of clerks and apprentices (1788-1788)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 23 August 1788. IR 1/33
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Apprentices and clerks (1788-1788)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 25 August to 31 December 1788. IR 1/34
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Masters of apprentices and clerks (1788-1788)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 25 August to 31 December 1788. IR 1/34
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Boys entering Rugby School (1788-1788)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Gravestones of Servants: Derbyshire (1788-1788)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Gravestones of Servants: Northamptonshire (1788-1788)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1788-1788)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1788-1788)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1788-1788)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1788-1788)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Witnesses to Marriages (1788-1788)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1789-1789)

Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1789-1789)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1789-1789)

Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1789-1789)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Apprentices and clerks (1789-1789)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1789. IR 1/34
>> Search this source

Masters of apprentices and clerks (1789-1789)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1789. IR 1/34
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1789-1789)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Bankrupts (1789-1789)

A list of bankrupts in England and Wales from 1 January to 30 June 1789 giving full name (surname first), address and occupation, and the date of bankruptcy.
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Gravestones of Servants: Gloucestershire (1789-1789)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Middlesex (1789-1789)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Oxfordshire (1789-1789)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Gravestones of Servants: Warwickshire (1789-1789)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1789-1789)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1789-1789)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1789-1789)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1789-1789)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Witnesses to Marriages (1789-1789)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Coggeshall, Essex, Owners and Occupiers (1789-1789)

The rental of the copyhold and freehold estates held of the manor of Coggeshall or Coggeshall Hall, gives for each holding the annual rent; the name of the owner of the estate at Michaelmas 1789; the name(s) of the occupier(s) at that time; and a description of the copyhold premises.
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