Sources 1730-1739

Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)

Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Apprenticeship (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by apprenticeship.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Birth (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by birth.
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Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to all the stray names in the records: the wives and father-in-laws by whom freedom was acquired; the masters of apprentices; and other persons mentioned by the way in the record.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Gift (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by gift.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by marriage.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by redemption.
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Tradesmen of Chester (1392-1805)

Lists of admissions of freemen of the city of Chester from the earliest surviving records to 1805 were compiled by J. H. E. Bennett and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society from 1906. These lists were extracted from the mayoral yearbooks (dating back to 1392) and twelve freemen's rolls covering 1538 to 1612 and 1636 to 1805; and a list of admissions for 1505-1506 in Harleian MS 2105 (British Library). The record does not become more or less continuous until about 1490: in all, 12,426 freedoms are recorded. Freedom of the city, necessary to practise a trade in the city, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); or by order of assembly. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B, freedom taken up by right of birth; I, freedom taken up by right of indenture; M. B., Mayor's Book; *, freedom granted by order of assembly.
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Merchants and traders in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1480-1770)

The society of Merchant Adventurers of Newcastle-upon-Tyne consisted of those who had obtained freedom of the city (allowing them to trade there) by birth as a son of, or apprenticeship, to a freeman: and within that, freedom of one of the three 'trades', i. e. boothman, draper or mercer. F. W. Dendy prepared extracts from the merchant adventurers' records, the first volume, published by the Surtees Society in 1895, containing extracts from the ordinances of the society through to 1894, the great majority being, however, from the 16th to 18th centuries. The Merchants' Company was founded with a series of enactments for their guidance and governance. But Dendy remarks that "Experience soon convinced them of the need of other laws, and these were framed from time to time. But during a very considerable period the members of the Society seem to have been influenced by a love of legislating, and their bye-laws increased to an unnecessary and perplexing extent." Indeed, many of the later ordinances amount to no more than minutes of particular orders aimed at particular people.
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Merchants and traders in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1515-1898)

The society of Merchant Adventurers of Newcastle-upon-Tyne consisted of those who had obtained freedom of the city (allowing them to trade there) by birth as a son of, or apprenticeship, to a freeman: and within that, freedom of one of the three 'trades', i. e. boothman, draper or mercer. F. W. Dendy prepared extracts from the merchant adventurers' records, the second volume, published by the Surtees Society in 1899 containing extracts from the minute books relating to the history of the merchants' court, an account of the long-standing dispute between the Newcastle company and the London company, some extracts relating to the relations between the Newcastle company and the Eastland Company (who had a monopoly of the trade with Russia and the Baltic), copies of the oaths used by the Newcastle company, the London company and the Eastland Company, and (pages 185 to 381) a list of the apprentices enrolled in, and of the freemen admitted to, the Newcastle company. This list is arranged in a table of seven columns: Name of Apprentice; Name of Father of Apprentice and Observations (particularly, instances where an apprentice is passed over to a new master during his apprenticeship); Master; Boothman (B.), Draper (D.) or Mercer (M.); Date of Indentures: Enrolment: Admission. All the dates are normalised to New Style, i. e. to the modern calendar. Finally, there is a list of sons and apprentices of members who, having thus acquired the right of freedom of the city, took up the freedom, but did not assume the freedom of any of the three trades. The index covers all the contents of the volume, not just the apprentice and freemen lists.
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Harley Correspondence (1516-1774)

Part of the Portland collection of manuscripts was transferred to Longleat in Wiltshire after the marriage in 1759 of Thomas Thynne, late Marquis of Bath, with the eldest daughter of the 2nd Duke of Portland. These included the papers of her maternal grandfather, Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford. Mrs S. C. Lomas prepared this calendar for the Historical Manuscripts Commission, published in 1907. These letters had been chosen in an earlier age from the Harvey family correspondence, and bound in two volumes as 'Select Autograph Letters, &c., 1516 to the middle of the 18th century,' and from among these Mrs Lomas in turn chose hitherto unpublished material that seemed of historical interest.
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Tradesmen of York (1559-1759)

No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city. Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 16,600 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year. Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen (per patres); and a handful who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.
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Harley Correspondence (1643-1773)

Part of the Portland collection of manuscripts was transferred to Longleat in Wiltshire after the marriage in 1759 of Thomas Thynne, late Marquis of Bath, with the eldest daughter of the 2nd Duke of Portland. These included the papers of her maternal grandfather, Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford. J. J. Cartwright and J. M. Rigg prepared this calendar for the Historical Manuscripts Commission, published in 1904. The text consists of a 'true relation of the siege of Brampton Castle in the county of Hereford' in 1643, and correspondence of various members of the family, especially the 2nd Earl of Oxford and the Duchess of Portland, from 1644 to 1773.
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Inhabitants of Preston in Lancashire (1653-1813)

The records of the three main courts of the borough - the Court Leet, the Mayor's Court and the Inquest or Inquisition of Office - were entered in three thick folio volumes in the municipal archives. Extracts from these, by Anthony Hewitson, a local historian, were published in the Preston Guardian from 16 November 1901 to 19 September 1903, and then revised and printed in this volume in 1905. These extracts necessarily dwell on the quaint and curious, and are mainly from the 17th and early 18th century.
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Inhabitants of Stichill in Roxburghshire and Berwickshire (1655-1807)

The minute book of the baron court of the parish of Stichill (Stitchill or Stichell) was transcribed by the Reverend George Gunn, rector of Stitchill and Hume, edited by Clement B. Gunn and printed by the Scottish Record Society in 1905. The court had jurisdiction throughout the baron over most matters of civil and criminal law, and the minutes of the court deal with personal disputes and the administration of the barony.
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Lawyers and officers of Lincoln's Inn (1660-1775)

Lincoln's Inn is one of the ancient inns of court in London exclusively invested with the right to call lawyers to the English bar. The Black Books of Lincoln's Inn are the main administrative records of the society, containing the names of those filling the different offices year by year; the annual accounts of the Pensioner and the Treasurer; regulations; punishments and fines for misdemeanours. This edition, printed for the inn in 1899, covers the volumes from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 to 1775 (with accounts as far as 23 January 1776), supplemented by material entries from the Red Books, which deal with orders concerning and admittances to the chambers of the inn, and the Serle's Court Book (begun in 1694) dealing with that court of the inn.
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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)

Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.
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Russell family correspondence (1670-1754)

Mrs S. C. Lomas of the Historical Manuscripts Commission prepared this report on the manuscripts of Mrs Frankland-Russell-Astley of Chequers Court in Buckinghamshire, published in 1900. There are a few items included earlier than 1670, and a few later than 1754, but broadly the collection was divided into three groups: 1. Russell and Frankland correspondence 1657 to 1697; 2. Cutts and Revett papers 1687 to 1708; 3. Colonel Charles Russell's letters 1742 to 1754. Sir John Russell was married to Frances, daughter of Oliver Cromwell; their daughter Elizabeth married sir Thomas Frankland. Their son John Russell, governor of Fort William in Bengal, married as his second wife Joanna (niece of Lord Cutts) widow of colonel Edmund Revett; and John's son, colonel Charles Russell married Colonel Revett's daughter, Mary Joanna. The largest part of this collection is the correspondence of Colonel Russell, of the 1st Regiment of Foot, and later of the Coldstream Guards, soldiering in the Netherlands.
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Sackville papers (1685-1799)

R. B. Knowles of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Mrs Stopford-Sackville to examine her family papers at Drayton House in Northamptonshire; and after his death the work was continued by W. O. Hewlett and published in 1904. These were chiefly letters, reports and other official documents from and to lord George Sackville, the third son of Lionel first duke of Dorset. The papers edited in this volume relate to the Monmouth insurrection 1685-1686; letters of Mary princess of Orange to lady Mary Forester; Sackville family papers and letters 1706-1799; home affairs 1755-1784; letters from lord George to General Irwin 1761-1784; Ireland 1731-1783; the war of the Austrian Succession 1743-1748; Cherbourgh and St Malo 1758; the Seven Years War 1758-1759; Minden 1759-1760; Spain 1778-1780; prince William Henry duke of Gloucester 1771-1779; India 1776-1784; and Minorca 1776-1782.
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Hertfordshire Sessions (1699-1850)

Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Rolls. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county, with presentments, petitions, and recognizances to appear as witnesses: many of the records concern the county authorities dealing with regulation of alehouses, religious conventicles, absence from church, highways, poaching, profanation of the Sabbath, exercising trades without due apprenticeship &c. Unlike the Sessions Books, the decisions of the justices are not recorded on the rolls, which serve more as a record of evidence and allegations. This is a calendar of abstracts of extracts: it is by no means a completely comprehensive record of the surviving Hertfordshire sessions rolls of the period, but coverage is good.
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Hertfordshire Justices of the Peace (1700-1752)

This is a list of Justices of the Peace for the County of Hertford mentioned in the Sessions Books for Hertfordshire sessions for the period.
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Hertfordshire Sessions (1700-1752)

Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county: numerically, the the most cases (240) concerned assaults; presentments about repairs to roads and bridges (67); larceny (63); unlicensed and disorderly alehouses (33); nuisances (28); and trading without due apprenticeship (24). This calendar gives abstracts of all entries in the Sessions Books and Minute Books for Hertfordshire sessions for the period.
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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1701-1753)

Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1755 to 1833 are also included here.
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Inhabitants of Hertfordshire (1702-1732)

These people signed various rolls at Hertford, mainly concerning allegiance. The letters are the key to the rolls involved: a. Oaths of allegiance, supremacy and abjuration under an Act of 1 George I: 1727 to 1732; b. Oaths of allegiance, supremacy and abjuration under an Act of 6 Anne: 25 April 1715; c. Oaths of allegiance, supremacy and abjuration under an Act of 6 Anne: 21 August 1714 to 21 April 1718; d. Oath for naturalizing Foreign Protestants under Act of 7 Anne: 10 May to 15 August 1719; e. Oath of allegiance under Act of 1 Anne: I. 13 July 1702 to 19 July 1714; II. 13 July 1702 to 19 February 1709; III. 13 July 1702 to 8 October 1708; f. Declaration against Transubstantiation, under Act of 1 William & Mary: I. 13 July 1702 to 9 January 1710; II. 12 July 1714 to 21 April 1718; III. 25 April 1715; IV. 10 July 1727 to 17 April 1732.
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Boys entering Sedbergh School (1720-1730)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
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Hastings and Rawdon family correspondence (1724-1817)

John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, of which this is the third volume, published in 1934, Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work being completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley. This volume covers two categories of the records: correspondence of the Hastings and Rawdon family 1724 to 1815; and letters of Warren Hastings, of Daylesford House, Worcestershire, to general Charles Hastings, afterwards sir Charles Hastings, bart.
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Apprentices registered at Bedford (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Apprentices registered in Berkshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Masters of Apprentices registered in Berkshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Apprentices registered at Brecon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Masters of Apprentices registered at Brecon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Apprentices registered at Buckingham (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Masters of Apprentices registered at Buckingham (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Apprentices registered in Cambridgeshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Masters of Apprentices registered in Cambridgeshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Apprentices registered at Chester (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Masters of Apprentices registered at Chester (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Apprentices registered at Colchester in Essex (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
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Masters of Apprentices registered at Colchester in Essex (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Cornwall (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Cornwall (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Cumberland and Westmorland (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Cumberland and Westmorland (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Denbigh (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Denbigh (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Derbyshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Derbyshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Devon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Devon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Dorchester in Dorset (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Dorchester in Dorset (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Durham (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Durham (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Exeter in Devon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Exeter in Devon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Glamorgan (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Glamorgan (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Gloucester (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Gloucester (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Hereford (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Hereford (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Huntingdon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Huntingdon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Kent (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Kent (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Liverpool in Lancashire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Liverpool in Lancashire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Leicester (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Leicester (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Lichfield in Staffordshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Lichfield in Staffordshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Lincoln (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Lincoln (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at King's Lynn in Norfolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at King's Lynn in Norfolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Norfolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Norfolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Northamptonshire and Warwickshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Northamptonshire and Warwickshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Northumberland (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Northumberland (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Norwich in Norfolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Norwich in Norfolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Nottinghamshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Nottinghamshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Plymouth in Devon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Plymouth in Devon (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Presteigne in Radnorshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Presteigne in Radnorshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Scotland (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces and from Scotland. The sums collected are recorded in Scottish money, with conversion to sterling for transfer to London. A Scottish pund was worth 20 English pence. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Scotland (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces and in Scotland. The sums collected are recorded in Scottish money, with conversion to sterling for transfer to London. A Scottish pund was worth 20 English pence. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Shropshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Shropshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Somerset (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Somerset (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Southampton in Hampshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Southampton in Hampshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Staffordshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Staffordshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Suffolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Suffolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Sussex (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Sussex (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Warwick (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Warwick (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered in Westmorland (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered in Westmorland (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Devizes in Wiltshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Devizes in Wiltshire (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Worcester (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Worcester (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at Yarmouth in Norfolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at Yarmouth in Norfolk (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Apprentices registered at York (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Masters of Apprentices registered at York (1728-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Baptisms (1730-1730)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1730-1730)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1730-1730)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1730-1730)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sherborne School (1730-1730)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1730-1730)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Masters and Apprentices (1730-1730)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 16 March to 31 December 1730.
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Boys entering Rugby School (1730-1730)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1730-1730)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1730-1730)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Gravestones from Calcutta St John (1730-1739)

The old Anglican church of St John in Calcutta was the last resting place of many of the British community in the city. These monumental inscriptions are recorded in the Bengal Obituary of 1851.
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Cambridgeshire Charters (1730-1739)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
>> Search this source

Essex Charters (1730-1739)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
>> Search this source

Kent Charters (1730-1739)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
>> Search this source

London Charters (1730-1739)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Sedbergh School (1730-1742)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1731-1731)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1731-1731)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1731-1731)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1731-1731)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1731-1731)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
>> Search this source

Masters and Apprentices (1731-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 2 November 1731.
>> Search this source

Masters and Apprentices (1731-1731)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 November to 31 December 1731
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1731-1731)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Gravestones of Servants: Berkshire (1731-1731)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1731-1731)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1731-1731)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

The Company of Masons of London (1731-1731)

Edward Conder gathered and published these surviving lists of members of the Fellowship or Mystery or Craft or Company of Free Masons of London from various dates from 1356 onwards.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1732-1732)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1732-1732)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1732-1732)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1732-1732)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1732-1732)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
>> Search this source

Masters and Apprentices (1732-1732)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 January to 30 December 1732
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1732-1732)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1732-1732)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1732-1732)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Baptisms (1733-1733)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1733-1733)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1733-1733)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1733-1733)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1733-1733)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
>> Search this source

Masters and Apprentices (1733-1733)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 2 August 1733
>> Search this source

Boys entering Rugby School (1733-1733)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1733-1733)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1733-1733)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1733-1733)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1733-1733)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
>> Search this source

East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 16 December 1734
>> Search this source

East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 18 November 1734
>> Search this source

East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 1 July 1734
>> Search this source

East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 21 October 1734
>> Search this source

East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 23 September 1734
>> Search this source

East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 26 August 1734
>> Search this source

East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 29 July 1734
>> Search this source

East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 3 June 1734
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 6 May 1734
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1734-1734)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 8 April 1734
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1734-1734)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1734-1734)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1734-1734)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1734-1734)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1734-1734)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1734-1734)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Rugby School (1734-1734)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Gravestones of Servants: Buckinghamshire (1734-1734)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1734-1734)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1734-1734)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1734-1734)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1734-1734)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 10 February 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 10 March 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 13 January 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 15 December 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 17 November 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 20 October 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 22 September 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 25 August 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 28 July 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 2 June 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 30 June 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 5 May 1735
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1735-1735)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 7 April 1735
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1735-1735)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1735-1735)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1735-1735)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1735-1735)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1735-1735)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1735-1735)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Masters and Apprentices (1735-1735)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 5 April to 31 December 1735
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Boys entering Rugby School (1735-1735)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Roman Catholics in Aberford, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish. The Aberford return includes Parlington.
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Roman Catholics in Appleton, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Bilsdale, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Coulton, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in East Ness, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Everingham, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Gilling, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Hawnby, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Hemsley, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Holme, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Hovingham, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Hutton Bushell, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Kirkby Moorside, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Kirkdale, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Leeds (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Malton, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in Scackleton, Yorkshire (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Roman Catholics in York and the Ainsty (1735-1735)

Papist Returns, lists of Roman Catholics sent in from the parishes of Yorkshire remained in the archives of the Archbishop of York at Bishopthorpe. Those for the city of York (and part of the Ainsty, Hutton Wensley, Fulford and Acaster Malbis), Leeds, and for Aberford, Bilsdale, Coulton, East Ness, Everingham, Gilling, Hawnby, Hemsley, Holme, Hovingham, Hutton Bushell, Kirkby Moorside, Kirkdale, Malton and Scackleton were printed in the third volume of The Northern Genealogist. Some of the lists merely give heads of households with occupations; others have the whole family group with servants; the return for Everingham sets out the return in columns, listing the whole familes, occupations, ages, and length of residence in the parish.
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Gravestones of Servants: Derbyshire (1735-1735)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1735-1735)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1735-1735)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1735-1735)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1735-1735)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Inhabitants of the Isle of Portland, Dorset (1735-1735)

An earthquake on 16 December 1735 'was felt near the Quarrys at the North End of the said Island by which the Earth for more than a mile in length sunk away from the Clift near the Sea and carry’d with it the Way leading to the Piers, Overturned the said Piers, and broke and destroyed the Crane thereon, so that at present it is impossible to carry down from the Quarry’s or to Ship Stone as formerly, by which means his Majesty will loose entirely the Revenue of fourpence per pr Tunn paid by all persons who Shipped Stone off the said Piers': this petition to the Treasury Commissioners, signed by the inhabitants of Portland, prayed 'that your Honour’s will take this Unhappy Circumstance into your Consideration and Order that the same may be Repaired fit for Shipping Stone as formerly'. T 1/288 f.167
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 12 January 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 13 December 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 15 November 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 18 October 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 20 September 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 23 August 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 26 July 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 28 June 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 31 May 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 3 May 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 5 April 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 8 March 1736
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1736-1736)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 9 February 1736
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1736-1736)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1736-1736)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1736-1736)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1736-1736)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1736-1736)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Masters and Apprentices (1736-1736)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 11 December 1736
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Masters and Apprentices (1736-1736)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 to 31 December 1736
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Boys entering Rugby School (1736-1736)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Gravestones of Servants: Warwickshire (1736-1736)

'Epitaphia, or a Collection of Memorials, Inscribed to the Memory of Good and Faithful Servants, Copied on the Spot, in Various Cemetaries throughout the Counties of Essex, Buckingham, Derby, Essex, Gloucester, Herts, Kent, Middlesex, Northampton, Oxford, Salop, Stafford, Surry, Warwick, Worcester, and York' was published in 1826. The anonymous collector had amassed copies of nearly 300 gravestones, mostly those of devoted domestic servants whose grieving employers thus commemorated their fidelity.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1736-1736)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1736-1736)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 10 January 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 12 December 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 14 November 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 17 October 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 19 September 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 22 August 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 25 July 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 27 June 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 2 May 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 4 April 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 7 February 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 7 March 1737
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1737-1737)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 9 May 1737
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1737-1737)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1737-1737)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1737-1737)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1737-1737)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1737-1737)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Masters and Apprentices (1737-1737)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1737
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Boys entering Rugby School (1737-1737)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1737-1737)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1737-1737)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 11 December 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 13 November 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 16 October 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 18 September 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 1 May 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 21 August 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 24 July 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 26 June 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 29 May 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 3 April 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 6 February 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 6 March 1738
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1738-1738)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 9 January 1738
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1738-1738)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1738-1738)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1738-1738)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1738-1738)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1738-1738)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1738-1738)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1738-1738)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Masters and Apprentices (1738-1738)

Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 7 October 1738
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Boys entering Rugby School (1738-1738)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1738-1738)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1738-1738)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1738-1738)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1738-1738)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 10 December 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 12 November 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 15 October 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 17 September 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 20 August 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 23 July 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 25 June 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 28 May 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 2 April 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 30 April 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 5 February 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 5 March 1739
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East Cheshire plaintiffs and defendants (1739-1739)

Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. The sample scan is taken from 29 July 1734: as in this case, whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled 'at the court door', in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. This index covers plaintiffs, defendants and bail sureties, but not court officials or attorneys. This index is for the court held on 8 January 1739
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1739-1739)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1727 to 1774 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father and mother, but do not give date of birth.
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Wandsworth Brides (1739-1739)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1739-1739)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1739-1739)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1739-1739)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John, who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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Boys entering Rugby School (1739-1739)

This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Baptisms (1739-1739)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Brides (1739-1739)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Burials (1739-1739)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Parish Registers of Morden in Surrey: Marriages: Bridegrooms (1739-1739)

The parish of Morden lay in Wallington hundred of Surrey, and in Surrey archdeaconry of the diocese of Winchester. F. Clayton prepared this transcript of the four earliest surviving registers, which was privately printed for the Parish Register Society as their 37th volume in 1901.
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Freehold Tenants of the Manor of Rusthall, Kent (1739-1739)

A list of the freehold tenants of the manor of Rusthall, parties to an agreement made with Maurice Conyers esquire, the lord of the manor, 21 November 1739
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