Sources 1610-1619

Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)

Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.
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Testators and legatees in London (1358-1688)

The Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1890. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. The bulk of the wills in this volume are from before 1600.
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Bury St Edmunds area testators and legatees (1370-1650)

A number of wills proved and registered in the courts of Bury St Edmunds Commisary and Sudbury Archdeaconry were selected by Samuel Tymms 'more with a view to illustrate the peculiar customs and language of the period than the topology or genealogy of the district' and transcribed for publication by the Camden Society in 1850. Most of those after 1450 are in English.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Apprenticeship (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by apprenticeship.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Birth (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by birth.
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Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to all the stray names in the records: the wives and father-in-laws by whom freedom was acquired; the masters of apprentices; and other persons mentioned by the way in the record.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Gift (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by gift.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by marriage.
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Freemen of Canterbury by Redemption (1392-1800)

No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by redemption.
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Tradesmen of Chester (1392-1805)

Lists of admissions of freemen of the city of Chester from the earliest surviving records to 1805 were compiled by J. H. E. Bennett and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society from 1906. These lists were extracted from the mayoral yearbooks (dating back to 1392) and twelve freemen's rolls covering 1538 to 1612 and 1636 to 1805; and a list of admissions for 1505-1506 in Harleian MS 2105 (British Library). The record does not become more or less continuous until about 1490: in all, 12,426 freedoms are recorded. Freedom of the city, necessary to practise a trade in the city, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); or by order of assembly. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B, freedom taken up by right of birth; I, freedom taken up by right of indenture; M. B., Mayor's Book; *, freedom granted by order of assembly.
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Burgesses of Preston, Lancashire, and other members of Preston guild merchant (1397-1682)

Freedom of the borough of Preston was necessary to trade in the town. The guild merchant maintained rolls of the burgesses, which were renewed every Preston guild, held every twenty years. The surviving rolls from 1397 to 1682 were edited by W. Alexander Abram, and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society in 1884 (volume ix). Each roll contains, firstly, a list of In-Burgesses, i. e., burgess inhabitants of the town, with the names of any adult sons eligible by way of inheritance to the freedom; then Foreign Burgesses (Burgenses Forinseci), i. e., those persons living outside the town who had acquired the freedom, plus the names of any adult sons; finally, there is a list of those who were not burgesses by inheritance, but had purchased freedom of the town. The only women to appear in these lists are three ladies in 1397, who were perhaps widows of burgesses. The text covers the rolls for the guilds merchant held in 1397 (20 Richard II: pages 1 to 7), 1415 (7 Henry V: 7-11), 1459 (37 Henry VI: 11-15), 1542 (34 Henry VIII: 15-19), 1562 (4 Elizabeth: 20-31), 1582 (24 Elizabeth: 31-46), 1602 (44 Elizabeth: 46-65), 1622 (20 James I: 65-94), 1642 (18 Charles I: 94-123), 1662 (14 Charles II: 123-159), and 1682 (34 Charles II: 160-202).
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Merchants and traders in Aberdeen (1399-1631)

A. M. Munro searched the council registers of the royal burgh of Aberdeen, and compiled this list of burgesses admited to the borough. The entries prior to 1591 were contained in lists engrossed in the council registers at the close of the minutes for the year ending at Michaelmas, but after that date in addition to the annual lists, which are continued, there is almost always a separate minute of admission under the respective dates. The records before 1591 are not only sparser, often with no more than a name, but are also lacking for 1401-1405, 1413-1432, 1434-1435, 1518-1519, 1557 and 1562-1564 - other blanks were filled in from the guildry accounts where such existed. Guild burgesses were allowed unfettered trading rights in Aberdeen; simple burgesses could only deal in Scottish wares (so being barred from the lucrative English and Flemish imports and exports); trade burgesses were limited to their own particular trades; and the council was able ex gratia to create honourary burgesses, who were accorded the full privileges of burgesses of guild and trade, and among whom numbered members of almost every family of note in Aberdeenshire. Burgesses could thus be created by descent, by apprenticeship into a trade, or ex gratia, and in the later portions of this roll the precise circumstances are usually given, sometimes also with the name of a cautioner or surety. Burgesses, masters and cautioners are all indexed here.
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Home family archives (1424-1671)

William Fraser of the Historical Manuscripts Commission examined the archives of the Earl of Home at Hirsel (near Coldstream in Berwickshire), and prepared this calendar, published in 1891.The most detailed account is of 'Documents, more or less of a Personal Nature relating to the Principal Members of the Family of Home' (pp. 87-107), and 'Old Charters and other Documents still in the Charter Chest at Hirsel, relating to Lands formerly possessed by the family' (107-170), with deeds relating to Auldcambus, Aldcathy, Arbirlot, Bedshiel, Bogend, Braidley, Brigham, Brighamshiels, Chirnside, Coldingham, Cowdenknowes, Crailing, Dalswinton, Derington, Dunglas, Eccles priory, Eltrive, Eskdale, Ewesdale, Fogo, Gordon, Greenlaw, Greenwood, Haddington, Harden, Hassington, Hassendean and Horsliehill, Hoscoat, Howlaws, Howpasley, Huntlywood, Jedburgh, Lambden, Lauder, Letham, Leyacres, Luchheild (in Fife), Mawdristoun (Manderston), Maw (in Fife), Mawes (in Perthshire), Mellerstain, East Nisbet, Samuelston, Smailholm, Sprouston, St Bothans (St Bathan), Swynset, Thornton, Tinneis (in Yarrow), and Upsetlington. Fraser was then allowed to inspect the family charters held by their law agent in Edinburgh in nine charter chests, and gives abstracts of the early items that he considered important. This volume also contains his calendar of some of the muniments of the Duke of Athole at Blair Castle, Blair Athole, concentrating on family correspondence from 1473 to 1721: this is also included in this index.
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Boys at Eton (1441-1698)

King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.
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Inhabitants of Salisbury (1443-1704)

A collection of transcripts of churchwardens' accounts from the parishes of St Edmund and St Thomas in Sarum (Salisbury in Wiltshire) by Henry James Fowle Swayne, the Recorder of Wilton, was published by the Wilts Record Society in 1896. The greater part of these accounts relate to expenditure to workmen on the church fabric, and income for rent of pews and the tolling of bells and obsequies for parishioners. There are several sources covered: the churchwardens' accounts for St Edmund's for 1443 to 1461; for St Thomas's 1545 to 1690, and some notes from 1704; and accounts of the stewards of the Fraternity of Jesus Mass founded in St Edmund's.
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Merchants and traders in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1480-1770)

The society of Merchant Adventurers of Newcastle-upon-Tyne consisted of those who had obtained freedom of the city (allowing them to trade there) by birth as a son of, or apprenticeship, to a freeman: and within that, freedom of one of the three 'trades', i. e. boothman, draper or mercer. F. W. Dendy prepared extracts from the merchant adventurers' records, the first volume, published by the Surtees Society in 1895, containing extracts from the ordinances of the society through to 1894, the great majority being, however, from the 16th to 18th centuries. The Merchants' Company was founded with a series of enactments for their guidance and governance. But Dendy remarks that "Experience soon convinced them of the need of other laws, and these were framed from time to time. But during a very considerable period the members of the Society seem to have been influenced by a love of legislating, and their bye-laws increased to an unnecessary and perplexing extent." Indeed, many of the later ordinances amount to no more than minutes of particular orders aimed at particular people.
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Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)

Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.
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Merchants and traders in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1515-1898)

The society of Merchant Adventurers of Newcastle-upon-Tyne consisted of those who had obtained freedom of the city (allowing them to trade there) by birth as a son of, or apprenticeship, to a freeman: and within that, freedom of one of the three 'trades', i. e. boothman, draper or mercer. F. W. Dendy prepared extracts from the merchant adventurers' records, the second volume, published by the Surtees Society in 1899 containing extracts from the minute books relating to the history of the merchants' court, an account of the long-standing dispute between the Newcastle company and the London company, some extracts relating to the relations between the Newcastle company and the Eastland Company (who had a monopoly of the trade with Russia and the Baltic), copies of the oaths used by the Newcastle company, the London company and the Eastland Company, and (pages 185 to 381) a list of the apprentices enrolled in, and of the freemen admitted to, the Newcastle company. This list is arranged in a table of seven columns: Name of Apprentice; Name of Father of Apprentice and Observations (particularly, instances where an apprentice is passed over to a new master during his apprenticeship); Master; Boothman (B.), Draper (D.) or Mercer (M.); Date of Indentures: Enrolment: Admission. All the dates are normalised to New Style, i. e. to the modern calendar. Finally, there is a list of sons and apprentices of members who, having thus acquired the right of freedom of the city, took up the freedom, but did not assume the freedom of any of the three trades. The index covers all the contents of the volume, not just the apprentice and freemen lists.
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Harley Correspondence (1516-1774)

Part of the Portland collection of manuscripts was transferred to Longleat in Wiltshire after the marriage in 1759 of Thomas Thynne, late Marquis of Bath, with the eldest daughter of the 2nd Duke of Portland. These included the papers of her maternal grandfather, Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford. Mrs S. C. Lomas prepared this calendar for the Historical Manuscripts Commission, published in 1907. These letters had been chosen in an earlier age from the Harvey family correspondence, and bound in two volumes as 'Select Autograph Letters, &c., 1516 to the middle of the 18th century,' and from among these Mrs Lomas in turn chose hitherto unpublished material that seemed of historical interest.
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London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)

London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.
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Hastings family correspondence (1528-1699)

John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, of which this is the second volume, published in 1930, Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work being completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley. This volume covers four categories of the records: correspondence of the Hastings family 1528 to 1699; newsletters sent by professional reporters in London 1669 to 1693; papers relating to the Band of Gentlemen Pensioners, of which Theophilus 7th earl of Huntingdon was captaon, 1677 to 1685; and correspondence of the Rawdon family, 1641 to 1694, including papers of George Monck, afterwards Duke of Albemarle, when commanding in Ulster.
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Inhabitants of Reading in Berkshire (1550-1667)

The borough of Reading in Berkshire comprised three ancient parishes - St Giles, St Lawrence and St Mary. The churchwardens' accounts of Reading St Mary from 1550 to 1667 were transcribed by Francis N. A. Garry and A. G. Garry and published in 1893. The accounts, usually signed off by the two churchwardens and two surveyors of the highways for the year, listed the income and expenditure of the church. Income included annual payments for seats in the pews; rents from church property; fees for the use of the pall and for tolling the knell (knill) at funerals, and for opening graves; and sums received for 'gatherings', i. e. money gathered from communicants at Easter, Hocktide, Mayday, Hallowmas, Christmas and Whit. Expenditure was largely on maintaining the church fabric, and paying the minor officials - most of the names found on this side of the account are of local workmen busy with repairs.
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Tradesmen of York (1559-1759)

No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city. Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 16,600 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year. Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen (per patres); and a handful who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.
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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1577-1700)

Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1588 to 1754 are also included here.
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Cheshire gentry and their ancestors (1580-1613)

Richard St George, Norroy King of Arms, and Henry St George, Bluemaster Pursuivant of Arms, of the College of Arms, conducted a heraldic visitation of Cheshire in 1612 and 1613, recording pedigrees of gentlemen claiming the right to bear coats of arms. A copy of their visitation was elaborated by the addition of other Cheshire pedigrees in Harleian Manuscript 1535: and this manuscript was edited by sir George J. Armytage and John Paul Rylands for publication by the Harleian Society in 1909. It has a large number of pedigrees of Cheshire gentry, with a few brief abstracts from early documents; and the pedigrees of some offshoots from old Cheshire stocks which had taken root in other counties. The pedigrees largely relate to the period back from 1613 to the previous visitation of 1580, but there is also some older material, particularly back into the 15th century. In most cases each pedigree is prefixed by a heraldic description of the coat of arms. The printed volume also includes (pages 1 to 4) a list of Cheshire men who disclaimed the right to bear a coat of arms at the 1613 visitation, taken from Harleian Manuscript 1070.
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Hertfordshire Sessions (1581-1700)

Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Rolls. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county, with presentments, petitions, and recognizances to appear as witnesses: many of the records concern the county authorities dealing with regulation of alehouses, religious conventicles, absence from church, highways, poaching, profanation of the Sabbath, exercising trades without due apprenticeship &c. Unlike the Sessions Books, the decisions of the justices are not recorded on the rolls, which serve more as a record of evidence and allegations. Where the date of a roll is given with an asterisk, it indicates that that particular document was not then in the county muniments, but in the archives of the Marquess of Salisbury (whose ancestors had served as Custos Rotulorum) at Hatfield House. This is a calendar of abstracts of extracts: it is by no means a completely comprehensive record of the surviving Hertfordshire sessions rolls of the period, but coverage is good.
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Lawyers and officers of Lincoln's Inn (1586-1660)

Lincoln's Inn is one of the ancient inns of court in London exclusively invested with the right to call lawyers to the English bar. The Black Books of Lincoln's Inn are the main administrative records of the society, containing the names of those filling the different offices year by year; the annual accounts of the Pensioner and the Treasurer; regulations; punishments and fines for misdemeanours. This edition, printed for the inn in 1898, covers the volumes from the 20th year of the reign of queen Elizabeth to the end of the Protectorate, supplemented by material entries from another series, called the Red Books, surviving from 1614, which deal with orders concerning and admittances to the chambers of the inn.
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Boys entering Sedbergh School (1600-1610)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
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Official Papers (1603-1610)

The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Scotland, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.
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Middlesex Sessions (1603-1625)

Incidents from the Middlesex Sessions Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the three volumes of Gaol Delivery Register, four volumes of Sessions of Peace Register and two volumes of Process Books of Indictments for the county of Middlesex from the reign of king James I. The references at the end of each item indicate the volume in question, the abbreviations being G. D. for Gaol Delivery, S. P. for Sessions of Peace, and S. O. T. for Session of Oyer and Terminer; occasionally preceded by S. for Special or G. for general, or followed by R. for Roll or Reg. for Register. It should be noted that, in the case of 'true bills' or indictments, the abstract starts with the date on which the offence took place, the date of the conviction &c. being at the end of the entry.
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Chief Constables for the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)

The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. This is the index to the chief constables.
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Deputy Sheriffs for the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)

The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. This is the index to the deputy sheriffs.
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High Constables for the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)

The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. This is the index to the high constables.
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Quarter Sessions for the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)

The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. Recusants (persons refusing or neglecting to attend parish church services) are listed in the summary of prosecutions on pages 4-5, 10, 17, 21, 42, 55-56, 61, 65, 69, 72, 79, 82, 95, 99, 113-115, 122, 131, 153-155 and 176.
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Jurymen in the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)

The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. This is the index to the jurors.
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Justices in the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)

The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. This is the index to the justices.
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Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1606-1616)

Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)
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Irish petitions, memoranda and correspondence (1606-1663)

John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, in three volumes; Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work was completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley, who also produced a fourth volume, published in 1947, by which time the manuscripts themselves had gone to the Henry E. Huntington Library at San Marino in California. This volume covers nine categories of the records, of which much, but not all, relates to Ireland: Correspondence of sir John Davies (Solicitor-General for Ireland 1603-1606 and Attorney-General for Ireland 1606-1619) (pages 1-17); Warrants, Petitions, &c., relating to Ireland, 1604-1618 and 1634 (18-54); Correspondence of John Bramhall (Bishop of Derry 1634-1660 and Archbishop of Armagh 1660-1663) (55-136); Petitions, Orders and Miscellaneius Documents mostly relating to the Episcopate of John Bramhall (137-152); Other Miscellaneous Irish Papers (153-185), including a particularly valuable Survey of the Undertakers and Servitors planted in Ulster between 2 February and 25 April 1613 (159-182); Royal Letters and Letters from the Lords of the Council, &c., mostly to the Earls of Huntingdon as Lords Lieutenant of Leicestershire and Rutland, and other Documents relating chiefly to County Affairs (186-221); Notes on Speeches and Proceedings in the House of Lords 1610-1621 and 1670-1695 (222-324); Later Miscellaneous and Additional Papers (325-358); and Letters and Papers of the Graham Family, chiefly relating to the disposal of the estates and titles of the Earls of Airth and Menteith and proposals for the marriage of Helen, daughter of sir James Graham.
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Inhabitants of Somerset (1607-1625)

The Reverend E. H. Bates prepared extracts from the Somerset quarter session records of 1607 to 1625 for publication by the Somerset Record Society (xxiii) in 1907. The period is covered by quarter sessions minute book 1 (1613 to 1620) and part of book 2 (1620-1627); these are based on the rolls of recognizances (taken, discharged and forfeited); criminal indictments (not touched on in Bates's extracts); and sessions rolls 1 to 16 (abstracted by A. J. Monday). The records covered and illustrated by these extracts are introduced under the heads Sessions Business; Relief of the Poor; Apprentices, Bastards and Lunatics; Charities (Alms- and Pest-Houses); Housing the Poor; Roads and Bridges; Rates and Appeals; Houses of Correction; and Drink Traffic.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1610-1610)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 12 April 1610.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1610-1610)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. These posts were filled by householders or their appointees. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 9 October 1610.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1610-1610)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
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Wandsworth Brides (1610-1610)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1610-1610)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1610-1610)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1610-1610)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1610-1610)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1610-1610)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1610-1610)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1610-1610)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1610-1613)

The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1610 to February 1613, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1889. The publication starts with the Acta and Decreta, a chronological consolidation of material from Acta Secreti Concilii proper, the Decreta, the Book of Commissions, the Book of Sederunts, the Minute Book of Processes, and The Book of the Isles. There is then a section of Royal and Other Letters (pp. 565-644); then acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp. 647-690); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (693-746). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.
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Deeds from Bath in Somerset (1610-1619)

More than 500 mediaeval deeds survived in the muniment chest of Bath in Somerset, almost all dealing with the transfers of small plots of land in the city. Each names the grantor and grantee, describes the land, and is witnessed by other citizens. This printed edition was prepared by the Reverend C. W. Shickle, Master of St John's Hospital in Bath.
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Bedfordshire charters (1610-1619)

Abstracts of charters and deeds in the Bodleian Library in Oxford; not only from the main sequences of charters, but also from volume lxxvi of the Dodsworth manuscripts there.
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Berkshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. He identified a few as forgeries, and these have been omitted from our indexes. The documents relate in the main to England, the Midlands, East Anglia and Yorkshire being particularly well represented, but there are some items from elsewhere in the British Isles and abroad.
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Cambridgeshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Cornish Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Derbyshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Essex Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Herefordshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Hertfordshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Lancashire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Leicestershire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Lincolnshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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London Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Middlesex Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Norfolk Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Northamptonshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Oxfordshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Somerset Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Suffolk Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Surrey Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Wiltshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Yorkshire Charters (1610-1619)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Boys entering Sedbergh School (1610-1623)

B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.
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Colonists and adventurers (1610-1660)

During this period, the English crown issued charters to companies of adventurers and individual proprietors to establish settlements in Acadia (Nova Scotia), Africa, Amazon, Anguilla, Antigua, Association (Tortuga), Bahamas, Barbadoes, Barbuda, Bermudas (Somers Islands), Canada, Cape Gratia de Dios, Carolina, Bay of Darien, Delaware Bay, Deseada, Dominica, Eleuthera, Enegada, Fernando de Noronho, Floria, Fonseca, Grenada, Guadaloupe, Guiana, Guinea, Henrietta, Jamaica, Long Island, Maine, Marigalante, Maryland, Metalina, Montserrat, Narrangansetts Bay, Nevis, New England (New Plymouth, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Haven), Newfoundland, New Hampshire, New York, Nova Scotia, Providence Island, Quebec, Redendo, Rhode Island, St Bartholomew, St Brandon, St Christopher's, St Eustache, St Lucia, St Martin, St Vincent, Sembrera, Surinam, Tadousac, Tobago, Todosantes, Trinidad and Virginia. The central archive relating to these ventures up to 1688 amounted to 71 volumes of correspondence, plus 109 entry books containing entries of letters sent to the colonies, of charters, commissions and instructions, minutes and proceedings of the companies and proprietaries that in the first instance governed several of the colonies, journals of the Board of Trade, &c. This archive, called the State Papers, Colonial Series, at the Public Record Office, was calendared for the period through to 1660 by W. Noel Sainsbury, and published in 1860. The first few pages include material as early as 1574, but the bulk of the volume is from 1610 to 1660, and that is indexed here.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1611-1611)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 28 March 1611.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1611-1611)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. These posts were filled by householders or their appointees. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 9 October 1611.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1611-1611)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
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Wandsworth Brides (1611-1611)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1611-1611)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1611-1611)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1611-1611)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1611-1611)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1611-1611)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1611-1611)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1611-1611)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
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Official Papers (1611-1618)

The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.
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London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)

London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1612-1612)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 16 April 1612.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1612-1612)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 1 October 1612.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1612-1612)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
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Wandsworth Brides (1612-1612)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1612-1612)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1612-1612)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1612-1612)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1612-1612)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1612-1612)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1612-1612)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1613-1613)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. These posts were filled by householders or their appointees. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 30 September 1613.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1613-1613)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 8 April 1613.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1613-1613)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
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Wandsworth Brides (1613-1613)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1613-1613)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1613-1613)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1613-1613)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1613-1613)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1613-1613)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1613-1613)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
>> Search this source

Inhabitants of Manchester (1614-1614)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 28 April 1614.
>> Search this source

Inhabitants of Manchester (1614-1614)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. These posts were filled by householders or their appointees. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 5 October 1614.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Baptisms (1614-1614)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1614-1614)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1614-1614)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1614-1614)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1614-1614)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1614-1614)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1614-1614)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1614-1614)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1614-1614)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
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Southwell Peculiar Baptisms, Marriages and Burials (1614-1641)

Each year a copy of the previous year's register of baptisms, marriages and burials, attested by the incumbent and churchwardens, was returned to the diocesan authorities. The peculiar of Southwell in Nottinghamshire was ordinarily exempt from episcopal jurisdiction in such matters, and the 24 parishes in the peculiar made similar returns to the Southwell registry. A few of these survive from this period, and they were transcribed by T. N. Blagg and printed as the first volume of the Record Series of the Thoroton Society in 1903. The returns are for Beckingham 1634, 1637, 1641; Bleasby 1633; Blidworth 1638; Calverton 1617, 1623; *Caunton 1614, 1619, 1628, 1641; Cropwell Bishop 1638, 164; Darlton 1622, 1633, 1641; *Dunham 1641; Edingley 1638; Farnsfield 1623; Halam 1622, 1637; Halloughton 1622, 1637; *Holme 1623, 1625, 1627, 1638, 1641; Kirklington 1622, 1638; *Morton 1622, 1623; *North Muskham 1623, 1633, 1638; South Muskham 1623; *Norwell 1638, 1641; Oxton 1622; *Ragnall 1623; Southwell 1633, 1640; Tithby (cum Cropwell Butler) 1625; Upton 1633, 1638; and Woodborough 1623, 1627, 1637, 1638 and 1640. Parishes marked with an asterisk (*) are those for which the original registers were missing for the period covered by the transcripts.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1615-1615)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 13 April 1615.
>> Search this source

Inhabitants of Manchester (1615-1615)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. These posts were filled by householders or their appointees. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 5 October 1615.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Baptisms (1615-1615)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1615-1615)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1615-1615)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1615-1615)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Boys entering Sherborne School (1615-1615)

The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Gresham's School (1615-1615)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1615-1615)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1615-1615)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1615-1615)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1615-1615)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1616-1616)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. These posts were filled by householders or their appointees. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 10 April 1616.
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1616-1616)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 2 September 1616.
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1616-1616)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
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Wandsworth Brides (1616-1616)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1616-1616)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1616-1616)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Boys entering Gresham's School (1616-1616)

The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1616-1616)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1616-1616)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1616-1616)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1616-1616)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1616-1617)

The Privy Council of James I was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters
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Manchester criminals, victims, witnesses and litigants (1616-1623)

Oswald Mosley of Ancoats kept a notebook of the cases that came before him as a magistrate at the various Manchester sessions. The pages from 10 April 1616 to 10 March 1623 were transcribed for the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society by Ernest Axon and published in 1901.
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Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1616-1624)

Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)
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Inhabitants of Manchester (1617-1617)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 1 October 1617.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Baptisms (1617-1617)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1617-1617)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1617-1617)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1617-1617)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1617-1617)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1617-1617)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1617-1617)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1617-1617)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
>> Search this source

Inhabitants of Manchester (1618-1618)

The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 9 April 1618.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Baptisms (1618-1618)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Brides (1618-1618)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Burials (1618-1618)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
>> Search this source

Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1618-1618)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1618-1618)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1618-1618)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1618-1618)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
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Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1618-1618)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1618-1619)

The Privy Council of James I was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters
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Wandsworth Baptisms (1619-1619)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The baptism registers from 1603 to 1726 normally give date of baptism, and the names of the child and its father, but do not give date of birth or the mother's christian name.
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Wandsworth Brides (1619-1619)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
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Wandsworth Burials (1619-1619)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.
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Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1619-1619)

The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1619-1619)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1619-1619)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Sureties (1619-1619)

Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.
>> Search this source

Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1619-1619)

J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.
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Hertfordshire Sessions (1619-1657)

Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Sessions Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county.
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