Sources 1290-1299

Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset (1001-1500)

Three early registers of the dean and chapter of Wells - the Liber Albus I (White Book; R I), Liber Albus II (R III), and Liber Ruber (Red Book; R II, section i) - were edited by W. H. B. Bird for the Historical Manuscripts Commissioners and published in 1907. These three books comprise, with some repetition, a cartulary of possessions of the cathedral, with grants of land dating back as early as the 8th century, well before the development of hereditary surnames in England; acts of the dean and chapter; and surveys of their estates, mostly in Somerset.
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Charter Rolls (1050-1326)

This abstract of the surviving charter rolls for 1300 to 1326, in the reigns of kings Edward I and II, was prepared by C. G. Crump and A. E. Stamp and published in 1908. The charter rolls not only recorded royal grants of lands, liberties and offices, but also enabled landowners to have their existing charters, their deeds of title, registered by the process of inspeximus and confirmation. After the Statute of Mortmain of 1279, this was of particular importance to religious houses, now greatly restricted in their ability to receive new donations of land, and anxious to prove title to their ancient property. Consequently, many charters of great age were copied onto the charter rolls.
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Pontefract Cartulary (1100-1300)

The Cluniac monastery of St John the Evangelist at Pontefract (Pomfret) in the West Riding of Yorkshire, was founded in the 11th century by Robert de Lascy. The grants of land made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which eventually came to Godfrey Wentworth of Woolley Park. This was edited by Richard Holmes and published by Yorkshire Archaeological Society in 1899 and 1902. The individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated: the numbering of the charters is modern, and amounts to 561. The cartulary itself contains 11 fasciculi, to which Holmes gave these section names - I. The Seigniorial Charters; II. The Ecclesiastical Charters; III. Royal Charters and Confirmations; IV. The Local Charters (Pontefract &c.); V. The Ledstone Charters; VI. The Ledsham Charters; VII. Miscellaneous Charters; VIII. The Peckfield and other Charters; IX. and X. Scarborough and other Charters; and XI. Leases to Tenants. Ledston(e), Ledsham and Peckfield are all close to Pontefract, as is most of the property.
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Hastings family deeds (1100-1600)

John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, of which is the first volume, published in 1928, Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli. This volume covers four categories of the records: the Ancient Deeds; Manorial and other Documents; Accounts and Inventories; and Miscellaneous Papers. Most, but not all, of the material is mediaeval. About half of the deeds relate to the family property in Leicestershire; then there are sections for Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire, Warwickshire, Staffordshire, Yorkshire, Northumberland, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, London, Wiltshire, Somersetshire, Devonshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, &c. The manorial section includes a partitions of the estates of the Earls of Leicester and Wilton about 1204 and 1277; manor court rolls are mentioned, but not extracted. Choicer items from the family accounts and inventories are copied in extenso for 1596 and 1607, and thereafter summarised. Most of the later material is merely dipped into for curiosities.
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Inhabitants of Leicester (1103-1327)

The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1899) of extracts from the earliest borough archives, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: the borough charters; the merchant gild rolls (from 1196 onwards); tax returns; court rolls (from about 1260 onwards); mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). The sample scan shows part of a gild entrance roll; those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but at this period the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for a loan for redemption of pontage and gavelpence of 1252-3 (pp. 44-46); five tallages of 1269 to 1271 brought together in a single table (128-145); and tallages of 1286 (208-211), 1307 (255-257), 1311 (272-274) and 1318 (310-313). The portmanmoot (or portmote) was the borough court dealing with minor infractions and civil suits. Finally, there is a calendar of charters (from c.1232 onwards, 381-400), and a list of mayors, bailiffs (reeves), receivers and serjeants (401-407).
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Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)

The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This first part contains the charters from folios 1 to 233, items I to DXCIII. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated.
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Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)

The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This second part contains the charters numbered DXCIV to MCLXXXIX. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated. The charters in this section are arranged by place, under the heads 'Normanby; Martona; Thornaby; Ugthorpe et Pecibiggyng; Levingtona; Jarum; Castle Levington; Kepwyck; Feyceby; Atona; Thresk; Neuton; Estona; Lackenby; Lyum; Cotum; Scheltona; Brottona; Moresom; Glasedale Daneby et Moresum; Kylton; Lofthus; Esingtona; Lyverton; Daneby; Glasdale; Uggethorpe; Percybyggyng; Sletholme; Scalynge; Redker; Merske; Hesele; Lunde super le Walde; Kirkburn; Rotsea; Bainton; Tibthorpe; Ingleby Arncliff; East Harlsey; Sawcock; Scarth; Stokesley; Kirkby-in-Cleveland; Battersby; Stainton-in-Cleveland; Maltby; Ayresome; York; Sinnington; Barningham and Newsham; Aylesby; Kelsterne; Bridekirk and Appleton; Aislaby; Hart and Hartlepool; Castle Eden; and Annandale'. Three further sections are added from other sources: 1. Documents connected with the burning of the priory church in 1289; 2. Extracts from the registers of the archbishops of York relating to the priory, 1238 to 1337; 3. A rent roll of the priory of about 1300 (pp. 412 to 450), giving many names of tenants.
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Douglas family charters (1150-1400)

The register of the more ancient writs of the Douglases of Dalkeith, Midlothian, Earls of Morton is probably the oldest chartulary of lay possessions in Scotland, and contains about 300 charters. It was edited by C. Innes and published by the Bannatyne Club in 1853 as part II of the Registrum Honoris de Morton. The names that occur are principally those of grantors, grantees and witnesses, mostly from Midlothian.
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Penshurst Manuscripts (1150-1580)

C. L. Kingsford prepared a calendar of the papers of Lord de L'Isle and Dudley at Penshurst Place in Kent for the Historical Manuscripts Commission, of which this first volume was published in 1925. The material is presented in eleven sections: I. 39 deeds relating to the Sydney family's Surrey and Sussex estates from about 1150 to 1502; II. Summary notes on deeds from these and other English counties (mainly Essex, Kent, Lincolnshire and Yorkshire) and from Wales and Ireland; III. Documents relating to Robertsbridge Abbey in Sussex (charters and deeds; rentals; court rolls; reeve's accounts at Footland; and bursar's accounts) from 1160 onwards; IV. Deeds and documents relating to the church and college of Tattershall in Lincolnshire (deeds; statutes and ordinances; miscellaneous papers; court rolls; and accounts (warden's, steward's, precentor's and impositor's, receiver's, bailiffs', and building and post-dissolution accounts); V. Family papers and estates accounts of the Cromwells of Tattershall (general accounts and wills; accounts of stewards of the household; building accounts of Tattershall castle; estate accounts); VI. Summary lists of various rolls, rentals, surveys and accounts, from various counties (mainly Kent and Lincolnshire); VII. Documents relating to Penshurst and its owners; VIII. Sydney family papers; IX. Accounts of the ironworks at Robertsbridge and in Glamorgan; X. Papers relating to the Council of Wales, 1526 to 1580; and XI. Irish Accounts, from sir Henry Sydney's terms as Vice-Treasurer and Lord Deputy of Ireland, 1556 to 1578.
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Lancashire and Cheshire tenants, patrons and friends of Whalley abbey (1178-1350)

About to leave for the Holy Land in 1178, John, constable of Chester, founded an abbey at Stanlawe (Stanlow) in Cheshire, endowing it with the townships of Staneye (Stanney) and Aston. Inundated by the sea at Stanlow, the monastery was removed to Whalley in Lancashire in 1294, and this foundation of Cistercians (grey monks) became one of the wealthiest in northern England. It received grants of lands in Ince, Garston, Childewall, Aykebergh, Little Woolton and Warrington in southwest Lancashire; Eccles, Barton, Maunton, Swynton, Pendleton, Worsley, Hulton, Westhalghton, Rumworth, Pendlebury, Cadishead and Denton in the south; Spotland, Chadwick, Castleton, Marland, Todmorden, Rochdale, Whitworth, Heley, Falenge, Chaderton, Wardle, Howarth and Saddleworth in the east; Wytton, Derwent, Plesyngton, Balderston, Salebury, Read, Downham, Clithero, Ribchester, Withnall, Wheelton and Stanworth in Blackburn hundred; and Warton, Carleton, Steyninges, Elswick and Preston in Amounderness hundred; as well as further property in Cheshire, in Chester, Nantwich, Northwich, Aston, Backford, Walton and Wynlaton. A careful copy of all these grants was compiled in the 14th century in what is called the Coucher Book or C(h)artulary of Whalley Abbey. The evidence had been carefully sorted and collated in twenty chapters or titles, each containing a transcript of the grants and evidences relating to a separate parish or township. The people that appear in these deeds are the donors, the witnesses, and occasionally tenants or occupiers of adjoining plots of land. The Coucher Book was edited for the Chetham Society by W. A. Hulton, and published in four volumes, starting in 1847.
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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of Ripon, Yorkshire (1178-1474)

The Ingilby Manuscript, containing part of a chapter act book, and a considerable fragment of a 14th-century cartulary, bound together some valuable early records surviving from the mediaeval collegiate church of St Peter and St Wilfrid at Ripon in the West Riding of Yorkshire. The manuscript was edited by Canon J. T. Fowler and published by the Surtees Society in 1908. The church had the patronage of many local advowsons, and the act book includes presentations and institutions to these, as well as other matters of internal administration. The cartulary is a compilation of copies of deeds by which local benefactors granted land to the college: most of the earlier ones are undated. The names that appear are those of the donors, of occasional tenants or occupiers of adjoining land, and also the witnesses to the charters. Most of the land granted was in the immediate vicinity of Ripon.
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Norfolk Feet of Fines (1196-1307)

Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Norfolk. These abstracts were prepared by Walter Rye.
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Lancashire Feet of Fines (1196-1307)

Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Lancashire. These abstracts were prepared by William Farrer for the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society and published in 1899, under the title 'Final Concords of the County of Lancaster, from the Original Chirographs, or Feet of Fines, preserved amongst the Palatinate of Lancaster Records in the Public Record Office'. They cover the period from the 7th year of king Richard I to the end of the reign of king Edward I, with a couple of fragmentary survivors from earlier (1187 and 1194).
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London and Middlesex Feet of Fines (1198-1485)

Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in London and Middlesex.
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Norman Rolls (1200-1417)

The dukedom of Normandy is one of the appendages of the English crown, but actual possession of the dukedom was actively contested by the kings of France. During the periods of English power records were kept for Normandy similar to those of the royal administration in England, with enrolment of letters and grants of liberties and privileges and confirmations of previous enjoyed rights. The rolls for 1200 to 1205 and during the reassertion of English rule under Henry V in 1417, were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy for the Commissioners of the Public Records, and published in 1835. Most of the persons mentioned are French inhabitants of Normandy or Englishmen in France, but there is also a long section (from page 122 onwards) of valuation of lands of Normans in England, where English jurors, county by English county, attest to acreage, numbers of cattle &c.
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Berkshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Cheshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Derbyshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Essex Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Huntingdonshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Kent Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Lincolnshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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English Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later. Sometimes the county to which a document is related was not readily identifiable, so we have grouped these as merely 'English Charters'.
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Norfolk Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Northamptonshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Oxfordshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Shropshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Somerset Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Suffolk Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Surrey Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Sussex Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Welsh Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Warwickshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Westmorland Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Wiltshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Worcestershire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Yorkshire Charters (1200-1500)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. Some such as these remain undated; they are mostly from 1200 to 1500, but may be earlier or later.
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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury (1214-1439)

Christopher Wordsworth, Master of the Hospital of St Nicholas in Salisbury, Wiltshire, published an edition of the 15th-century cartulary of that foundation in 1902. While transcribing the text, he interspersed it with notes and lists from his own researches so as to provide a general history of the hospital, and some of the material dates from much later than 1500, and relates to those institutions which he regarded as daughter institutions or offshoots of the hospital. There are later additions to the cartulary through to 1639, and records of the Chapel of St John Baptist on the Isle, the Scotist College of St Nicholas de Vaux (Valle Scholarium), and the collegiate church of St Edmund, Salisbury. There is also a calendar of records belonging to the hospital. The cartulary itself is a quarto codex of 80 leaves, copying charters of bequests to the hospital, and in these the main persons to appear are the benefactors, the witnesses, and occasionally the names of tenants, occupiers of adjoining tenements, and members of the hospital clergy. The cartulary is in six geographical sections: I, Box, Wyvelesford and Manningford Bohun; II, Broad Hinton; III, Fyssherton (Fisherton Aucher or Anger); IV, East and West Harnham; V, Salisbury; and VI, Gerardeston (Gurston in Broadchalke).
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Chancery Warrants (1244-1326)

Warrants were issued by the kings of England to the royal chancery: most of these warrants led to further proceedings which are recorded on the Charter Rolls, Patent Rolls, Fine Rolls, Close Rolls or the Inquisitions: but archivists have identified a large number of warrants for which there are no such equivalent records, and those for the reigns of Edward I and Edward II are gathered here. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but with occasional items referring to Ireland and the English possessions in France.
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Grantors, grantees and witnesses in Cheshire (1250-1299)

The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. Turner also looked through the rolls from the reigns of queen Elizabeth and king James I, and copied into this calendar abstracts of enrolments of early deeds (many undated) of the 13th century (with some later items). These are indexed here.
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Clergy and benefactors of the bishopric of Moray (1250-1540)

The mediaeval diocese of Moray comprised the shire of Elgin and Forres (or Moray), Nairnshire, and a large part of the shires of Inverness and Banff, in the sheriffdom of Elgin and Forres (Moray). The cathedral was attacked and burned by the Wolf of Badenoch (Alexander earl of Buchan and lord of Badenoch): but about 1400 an attempt was made to piece together surviving archives into a bishop's register. The Liber Episcopi contains the canons and constitution of the church, and charters relating to episcopal privileges and properties; the Liber Decani is the dean and chapter register. A fair copy of these records, plus later charters and writs, was made in 1540 and is called the Red Book of the Church of Moray. These manuscripts, together with other material to as late as 1623, were collated for the Bannatyne Club and printed in 1837.
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Testators and legatees in London (1258-1358)

The mediaeval Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1889. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. Sometimes there were further proceedings in the court relating to the will, such as 'It was found by a jury that the testator was of full age when he made the above testament', a statement as to where the testament had been proved, or proceedings on a challenge to the testament &c. - such additional material is added in a smaller typeface in this edition.
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Cheshire Court Rolls (1259-1290)

Civil and criminal cases for most of Cheshire were handled by the county courts. Here we have the county court rolls for November 1259 to August 1260, December 1281 to September 1282, and December 1286 to September 1289. The city of Chester exercised its own jurisdiction, and here we have crown pleas and presentments from 1287 to 1297. The royal manor of Macclesfield in the east of the county had three independent jurisdictions - the hundred, forest and borough. Royal justices in eyre dealt with civil and criminal cases from the hundred and forest during their yearly visits, and here we have records from 1284 to 1290. Also covered by this index is an Inquest of Service in Time of War in Wales of 1288, listing knight's fees in the county.
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Clerks and Clergy in Worcestershire and southwest Warwickshire. (1268-1301)

The register of bishop Godfrey Giffard of Worcester, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, but with some parochial affairs and disputes with names of parishioners. The diocese of Worcester at this period was almost exactly coextensive with the county of Worcester (minus its western finger), plus southwest Warwickshire (including Warwick itself). The register also includes ordination lists (as in the sample scan) of subdeacons, deacons and priests.
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Tradesmen of York (1272-1558)

No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city.Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 19,900 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year, the year being here reckoned as starting at Michaelmas (29 September) until 1373, and thence at Candlemas (2 February). Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; and those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.
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Wiltshire Feet of Fines (1273-1326)

Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Wiltshire. These abstracts were prepared by R. B. Pugh for the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society Records Branch and published in 1939, under the title 'Abstracts of Feet of Fines relating to Wiltshire for the Reigns of Edward I and Edward II'. Pugh made abstracts not only of the Wiltshire feet of fines for the two reigns but also of the Wiltshire content of those feet of fines covering two or more counties, which are archived separately under 'Divers Counties'. Each entry starts with a sequential number within the regnal year. The date then given is the date on which the original writ was returnable in court, rather than the date on which proceedings were completed. The dates do not fall on the quarter days themselves (Michaelmas, Hilary, Easter and Trinity) but on the octave (oct., 7 days after), quindene (quin., 14 days after), or three weeks later, &c. Then there is the name of the party initiating the action (X: pl., plaintiff, or dem., demandant), and then that of the defendant (def.) or impedient (imp.) (Y). Then there is a summary description of the land involved; and then a code indicating the precise nature of the action. Seven of these (A. to G.) are variants on the theme of X having acknowledged the premises to be the right of Y; but H. indicates a simple complete grant from X to Y, complete with actual transfer of possession. In cases B., C., E. and G. it is X, not Y, on whom the property is settled. If there is a warranty clause, or a more involved settlement, the details are given.
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Yorkshire Inquisitions (1275-1295)

Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1898. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.
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Inhabitants of London (1275-1298)

Liber Horn or the Lesser Black Book, now known as Letter Book A of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration. The letter books are so called because they were lettered from A to Z and from AA to ZZ, not because they were books of letters. Letter Book A was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe for the corporation and printed in 1899.
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Inhabitants of London (1275-1312)

Letter Book B of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration.
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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire, Berkshire, Dorset and Wiltshire (1283-1317)

The register of bishop Richard de Swinfield of Hereford, containing general diocesan business. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire. The register also includes ordinations from the diocese of Salisbury (then covering Berkshire, Dorset and Wiltshire) for 1284-1291.
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Inhabitants of Norwich (1288-1391)

Among the documents preserved in the record room of the Guildhall in the city of Norwich were 13 rolls connected with the leet courts in the city during the 13th and 14th centuries while the frankpledge system on which they were based was still in full operation. William Hudson, vicar of St Peter Permountergate in the city, prepared a copy of the earliest of these, from 1288, and extracts from the leet rolls of 1289, 1290, 1291, 1293, 1296, 1300, c1307, 1313, 1375 and 1391, and from an account of amercements in 1364, a tithing roll of Mancroft leet of 1311, and inquisitions before the bailiffs in 1350, and these were published by the Selden Society in 1892, with an English translation facing the extended Latin text. In 1288 there were four leets in the city - Conesford (North Conesford, South Conesford and Berstrete subleets), Manecroft (St Stephen, St Peter de Manecroft), Wymer or Westwyk (St Giles, St Gregory, St Andrew and St George), and Over the Water (St Michael and St Clement. Each leet had separate courts and separate records within the rolls. Hudson lists the main categories of items recorded as: murder, violent death, nuisances, weights, unwholesome food, larceny, assaults, hue and cry, being out of tithing, non-attendance at leet, purprestures, forestalling, unlawful trading, craft gilds, fraudulent work, and impleading in the Court Christian.
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Courtroll of Combe in Hampshire (1290-1290)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 9, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1289 to August 1290. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Cimiterio' for Churchyard).
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Courtroll of Cottisford, Oxfordshire (1290-1290)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 9, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1289 to August 1290. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Cimiterio' for Churchyard).
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Courtroll of Ogbourne, Wiltshire (1290-1290)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 9, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1289 to August 1290. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Cimiterio' for Churchyard).
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Courtroll of Ruislip, Middlesex (1290-1290)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 9, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1289 to August 1290. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Cimiterio' for Churchyard).
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Courtroll of Weedon Beck, Northamptonshire (1290-1290)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 9, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1289 to August 1290. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Cimiterio' for Churchyard).
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Court Roll of Ruislip, Middlesex (1290-1290)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 10, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1290 to July 1291. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Arbore' for Tree). The courtrolls represented are those of Atherstone (Warwickshire) 9 May 1291; Weedon Beck (Northamptonshire) 7 May 1291; and Ruislip (Middlesex) 18 October 1290 and 31 July 1291. We have indexed each court separately.
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Gidding Court Rolls (1290-1290)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of Gidding. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of five rotulets (Portf. 34, No. 46) includes a record of the proceedings at Gidding view of frankpledge 28 November 1290. These were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone.
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Deeds from Bath in Somerset (1290-1299)

More than 500 mediaeval deeds survived in the muniment chest of Bath in Somerset, almost all dealing with the transfers of small plots of land in the city. Each names the grantor and grantee, describes the land, and is witnessed by other citizens. This printed edition was prepared by the Reverend C. W. Shickle, Master of St John's Hospital in Bath. Where (as in many cases) the earliest deeds were undated, he was able to assign periods to each on the basis of style and content, particularly the names of witnesses.
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Buckinghamshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Cambridgeshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Durham Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Essex Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Gloucestershire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Hampshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Hertfordshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Kent Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Leicestershire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Lincolnshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Norfolk Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Northamptonshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Northumberland Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Nottinghamshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Oxfordshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Staffordshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Suffolk Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Sussex Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Worcestershire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Yorkshire Charters (1290-1299)

A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Court Roll of Atherstone, Warwickshire (1291-1291)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 10, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1290 to July 1291. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Arbore' for Tree). The courtrolls represented are those of Atherstone (Warwickshire) 9 May 1291; Weedon Beck (Northamptonshire) 7 May 1291; and Ruislip (Middlesex) 18 October 1290 and 31 July 1291. We have indexed each court separately.
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Court Roll of Ruislip, Middlesex (1291-1291)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 10, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1290 to July 1291. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Arbore' for Tree). The courtrolls represented are those of Atherstone (Warwickshire) 9 May 1291; Weedon Beck (Northamptonshire) 7 May 1291; and Ruislip (Middlesex) 18 October 1290 and 31 July 1291. We have indexed each court separately.
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Court Roll of Weedon Beck, Northamptonshire (1291-1291)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 10, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from October 1290 to July 1291. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Arbore' for Tree). The courtrolls represented are those of Atherstone (Warwickshire) 9 May 1291; Weedon Beck (Northamptonshire) 7 May 1291; and Ruislip (Middlesex) 18 October 1290 and 31 July 1291. We have indexed each court separately.
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Freemen and citizens of London (1291-1309)

Letter Book C of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c. The text was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe and printed by order of the Corporation of the City of London in 1901.
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Cheshire Pleas (1292-1292)

Civil pleas for Cheshire were recorded in abbreviated Latin on parchment and sewn together in annual rolls, preserved at Chester castle until the 19th century, when they were removed to London. The great majority of these are unpublished: this is a transcript by David Bethell of the court's proceedings on Tuesday 28 October 1292. CHES 29/7
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Cheshire Pleas (1292-1292)

Civil pleas for Cheshire were recorded in abbreviated Latin on parchment and sewn together in annual rolls, preserved at Chester castle until the 19th century, when they were removed to London. The great majority of these are unpublished: this is a transcript by David Bethell of the court's proceedings on Tuesday 9 December 1292. CHES 29/7
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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)

Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.
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Broughton Court Rolls (1293-1293)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 30 June 1293
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Broughton Court Rolls (1293-1293)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 9 June 1293
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Broughton Court Rolls (1293-1293)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 19 May 1293
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Broughton Court Rolls (1293-1293)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 6 October 1293
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Cheshire Pleas (1293-1293)

Civil pleas for Cheshire were recorded in abbreviated Latin on parchment and sewn together in annual rolls, preserved at Chester castle until the 19th century, when they were removed to London. The great majority of these are unpublished: this is a transcript by David Bethell of the court's proceedings on Tuesday 14 April 1293. CHES 29/7
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Cheshire Pleas (1293-1293)

Civil pleas for Cheshire were recorded in abbreviated Latin on parchment and sewn together in annual rolls, preserved at Chester castle until the 19th century, when they were removed to London. The great majority of these are unpublished: this is a transcript by David Bethell of the court's proceedings on Tuesday 18 August 1293. CHES 29/7
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Cheshire Pleas (1293-1293)

Civil pleas for Cheshire were recorded in abbreviated Latin on parchment and sewn together in annual rolls, preserved at Chester castle until the 19th century, when they were removed to London. The great majority of these are unpublished: this is a transcript by David Bethell of the court's proceedings on Tuesday 20 January 1293. CHES 29/7
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Cheshire Pleas (1293-1293)

Civil pleas for Cheshire were recorded in abbreviated Latin on parchment and sewn together in annual rolls, preserved at Chester castle until the 19th century, when they were removed to London. The great majority of these are unpublished: this is a transcript by David Bethell of the court's proceedings on Tuesday 26 May 1293. CHES 29/7
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Cheshire Pleas (1293-1293)

Civil pleas for Cheshire were recorded in abbreviated Latin on parchment and sewn together in annual rolls, preserved at Chester castle until the 19th century, when they were removed to London. The great majority of these are unpublished: this is a transcript by David Bethell of the court's proceedings on Tuesday 3 March 1293. CHES 29/7
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Cheshire Pleas (1293-1293)

Civil pleas for Cheshire were recorded in abbreviated Latin on parchment and sewn together in annual rolls, preserved at Chester castle until the 19th century, when they were removed to London. The great majority of these are unpublished: this is a transcript by David Bethell of the court's proceedings on Tuesday 7 July 1293. CHES 29/7
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Broughton Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 27 April 1294
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Broughton Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 31 August 1294
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Broughton Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 14 December 1294
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Broughton Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 20 July 1294
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Broughton Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 6 July 1294
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Broughton Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 2 March 1294
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Broughton Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 18 May 1294
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Broughton Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 21 September 1294
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 2 August 1294
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 23 August 1294
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 6 December 1294
>> Search this source

King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 12 July 1294
>> Search this source

King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 21 June 1294
>> Search this source

King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 15 November 1294
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 25 October 1294
>> Search this source

King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 4 October 1294
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1294-1294)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 13 September 1294
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Yorkshire Inquisitions (1294-1303)

Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1902. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c. The volume also includes two stray inquests, from 1245 and 1282.
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Broughton Court Rolls (1295-1295)

Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone. 11 January 1295
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1295-1295)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 16 December 1295
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1295-1295)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 24 January 1295
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1295-1295)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 3 January 1295
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1295-1295)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: Spring 1295
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Taxpayers of Barcombe hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Barcombe hundred comprised the parishes of Barcombe, Hamsey and Newick.
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Taxpayers of Brighton and Blatchington in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. This list is for the townships of Blechytone (Blatchington) and Brystelmstone (Brighthelmstone or Brighton): there is a separate list for Brighton (Brytelmstone) and Moulsecombe (Molscumbe), the inhabitants of Brighton being divided between the two.
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Taxpayers of Bokkyng in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. The township of Bokkyng, in Whalesbone hundred, disappeared as a township and a name during the Middle Ages: it will have been close to the modern town of Brighton.
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Taxpayers of Balmer in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. The township of Balmer (Borghemar) lay in the parish of Falmer: it is 4 miles northeast of Brighton.
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Taxpayers of Brighton and Moulsecombe in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Brighton (Brytelmstone) and Moulsecombe (Molscumbe) were listed here together: there is a separate list for Blechytone (Blatchington) and Brystelmstone (Brighthelmstone or Brighton), inhabitants of Brighton being divided between the two.
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Taxpayers of Buttinghill hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Buttinghill hundred comprised the parishes of Ardingley, Balcombe, Bolney, Clayton, Crawley, Cuckfield, Hurst Pierpoint, Keymer, Slaugham, Twineham, West Hoathly and Worth. This short list of the jurati or assessors for the hundred does not distinguish where each person lived.
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Taxpayers of Crawley, near Horsham, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Fishergate hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Fishergate hundred comprised the parishes of Aldrington (Atherington), Hangleton and Portslade, near Brighton. This short list of the jurati or sworn assessors for the hundred does not identify to which parishes they belonged.
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Taxpayers of Holmstrow hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Holmstrow hundred comprised the parishes of Newhaven (Meaching), Piddinghoe, Rodmell, Southease and Telscombe.
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Taxpayers of Hove in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Hurst Pierpoint and Cuckfield, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Iford, near Lewes, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Keymer and Clayton, near Cuckfield, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Kingston, near Lewes, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Lewes in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Locfeld, near Lewes, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. The township of Locfeld, now lost, was in or near the parish of Chailey.
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Taxpayers of Lindfield and Burleigh, near Streat, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Newhaven and Piddinghoe, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. This is the return for Mechynge (Meaching or Newhaven) and Pydingeho (Piddinghoe).
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Taxpayers of Newtimber and Pyecombe, near Brighton, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Patcham, near Brighton, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Poynings, near Brighton, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Poynings hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Poynings hundred comprised the parishes of Edburton, Newtimber, Poynings, and Pyecombe, near Brighton; but this short list of jurati or assessors does not identify which places each represented.
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Taxpayers of Portslade and Atlingworth, near Brighton, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Street (Streat), near Lewes, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Street (Streat) hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. The hundred of Street comprised the parishes of Chailey, Ditchling, Plumpton, St John sub Castro, Street, Westmeston and Wivelsfield, near Lewes: but this short list of jurati or assessors does not indicate from which place each one came.
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Taxpayers of Southover, near Lewes, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Swanborough hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. The hundred of Swanborough comprised the parishes of Iford, Kingston, Westout, and Southover, near Lewes: but this short list of jurati or assessors does not indicate which places they each represented.
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Villeins of Earl Warren, of Younsmere hundred, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Younsmere hundred comprised the parishes of Falmer, Ovingdean and Rottingdean, near Brighton.
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Taxpayers of Whalesbone hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Whalesbone hundred comprised the parishes of Brighthelmstone (Brighton) and West Blatchington.
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Taxpayers of Westout, near Lewes, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849.
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Taxpayers of Windham hundred, in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. The hundred of Windham was later assimilated into Buttinghill hundred, comprising the parishes of Ardingley, Balcombe, Bolney, Clayton, Crawley, Cuckfield, Hurst Pierpoint, Keymer, Slaugham, Twineham, West Hoathly and Worth.
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Taxpayers of Younsmere hundred in Sussex (1296-1296)

This roll of a tax of an eleventh assessed on the inhabitants of the rape of Lewes in Sussex was delivered to the Treasury in May 1296: the roll, remaining among the Carlton Ride Manuscripts (E. B. 1781) was edited and annotated by W. H. Blauuw, and published by the Sussex Archaeological Society in 1849. Younsmere hundred comprised the parishes of Falmer, Ovingdean and Rottingdean, near Brighton.
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Courtroll of Ogbourne, Wiltshire (1296-1296)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 11, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from June to July 1296. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames. The courtrolls represented are those of Ogbourne (Wiltshire) 28 July 1296; Weedon Beck (Northamptonshire) 21 July 1296; and Ruislip (Middlesex) 15 June 1296.
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Courtroll of Ruislip, Middlesex (1296-1296)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 11, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from June to July 1296. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames. The courtrolls represented are those of Ogbourne (Wiltshire) 28 July 1296; Weedon Beck (Northamptonshire) 21 July 1296; and Ruislip (Middlesex) 15 June 1296.
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Courtroll of Weedon Beck, Northamptonshire (1296-1296)

King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. C 11, a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from June to July 1296. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames. The courtrolls represented are those of Ogbourne (Wiltshire) 28 July 1296; Weedon Beck (Northamptonshire) 21 July 1296; and Ruislip (Middlesex) 15 June 1296.
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1296-1296)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 19 March 1296
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Court rolls of manors held by Durham priory (1296-1384)

The cathedral priory of Benedictines (black monks) of St Cuthbert at Durham possessed many manors in the county. These were administered by halmotes, or manor courts, held in three sessions (tourns or turns) each year (here marked I., II. and III.), before the terrar (obedientiary), steward, bursar, and/or the prior himself. The court rolls recording proceedings in these courts survive from 1296, 1300, 1309, and from 1333, but with years missing, until becoming fairly continuous from 1365 onwards. Extracts from the rolls from 1296 to 1384 were edited by John Booth and published by the Surtees Society in 1886. The manors under this jurisdiction were Aycliffe, Bellasis, (Newton) Bewley, Billingham, Burdun, Chilton, Coupon, Dalton, Edmondbyers, Ferry (Hill, or Ferrycliffe), Fulwell, Harton, Hebburn, Hedworth, Hesledon, Heworth, Jarrow, Kirk Merrington, East Merrington, West Merrington and Mid Merrington, Monkton, Moorsley, Newton Ketton, Nunstanton, North and South Pittington, East and West Rainton, Ravensflat, Shields, Southwick, Spen, Usworth, Wallsend, Wardley, Wearmouth, Westoe, Willington and Wolviston. The main contents of the records are demises of land held by the bond tenants, neifs, cotmen and others, and of the demesne lands; and bye-laws and pains (penalties) for breach of these; and other minor delinquencies. Normally, when a farm, cottage or piece of land was let to a new tenant, the name of the last tenant is also given, as well as the amount of the rent, and the amount of the gersum (fine on entry). These court rolls contain some of the only surviving evidence for the inhabitants of these townships in this period: but this publication was of extracts, and was not comprehensive. It should also be noted that the third tourn each year (III.) usually took place in January to March, and so by modern dating in the following year. Thus, the third tourn of 1296 was held on 4 March 1297.
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Inhabitants of Yorkshire (1297-1297)

Taxation roll of the lay (non-clergy) inhabitants of Yorkshire from the 25th year of the reign of king Edward I. Latin
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King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls (1297-1297)

Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288 to 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone: 29 April 1297
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Inhabitants of Cambridge (1298-1389)

'Cambridge Gild Records' was edited by Mary Bateson for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, and printed in 1903. Several important records for the town are brought together: minutes of the Gild of St Mary in the church of St Mary in the Market Place, 1298-1319 (pages 1-13); bede rolls of the same of around 1349 (14-25); minutes of the Gild of Corpus Christi in the church of St Bene't (26-62); returns for all the Cambridge gilds in 1389 (63-128); a calendar of deeds connected with the gilds of St Mary and Corpus Christi (129-150); and also a subsidy roll for the borough, listing householders in the 8th year of king Edward II (1314-1315) (151-157). The gild minutes include lists of persons entering the gild, usually paying a certain amount for alms and for wax for lights (candles). The bede rolls list prayers for the souls of the deceased, using the formula 'pro anima ..... (et ..... uxoris ejus)', 'for the soul of ..... (and of ..... his wife)'. Dates are not generally given, but most of the entries in these bede rolls are from 1349 to 1352.
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