Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Stookes Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'stookes'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 20 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Single Surname Subscription
Buying all 20 results of this search individually would cost £102.00. But you can have free access to all 20 records for a year, to view, to save and print, for £100. Save £2.00. More...

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

STOOKES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Householders of Woodbury, Devon (1536)
The Woodbury Church Ledger or Malt Book contained assessments of householders in the parish, arranged district by district, for the levy of the malt rate. This is the return for 12 March 1536.

STOOKES. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Householders of Woodbury, Devon
 (1536)
The English in Holland and Flanders (1586-1587)
The State Papers Foreign of queen Elizabeth consist mainly of letters and reports concerning England's relations with continental Europe. The inhabitants of the Low Countries were at this period attempting to throw off the Spanish yoke, and Elizabeth sent considerable forces to their aid: the English leader, Robert Dudley earl of Leicester, was offered the governorship of the States General. The papers relating to Holland and Flanders in the State Papers Foreign are so voluminous in consequence, that a separate calendar was edited by Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B. Hinds under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, this volume, covering June 1586 to March 1587, being published in 1927.

STOOKES. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
The English in Holland and Flanders
 (1586-1587)
London Inquisitions Post Mortem (1577-1603)
Full and complete abstracts of inquisitions post mortem for the City of London in this period. These are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown. The precise date of death of the deceased and the age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c. This abstract also includes a handful of earlier items omitted from previous volumes.

STOOKES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London Inquisitions Post Mortem
 (1577-1603)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

STOOKES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
Surrey Sessions (1661-1663)
Surrey Sessions Rolls and Order Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the Order Books from October 1661 to January 1663, inclusive, and the Sessions Rolls for October 1661, January 1662, April 1662, July 1662, October 1662 and January 1663.

STOOKES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Surrey Sessions
 (1661-1663)
Middlesex Recusants (1625-1666)
Incidents from the Middlesex Sessions Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the volumes of Gaol Delivery Register, Books and Rolls, Sessions of Peace Register, and Process Books of Indictments for the county of Middlesex from the death of king James I to the Great Fire of London. The references at the end of each item indicate the volume in question, the abbreviations being G. D. for Gaol Delivery, S. P. for Sessions of Peace, and S. O. T. for Session of Oyer and Terminer; occasionally preceded by S. for Special or G. for general, or followed by R. for Roll or Reg. for Register. It should be noted that, in the case of 'true bills' or indictments, the abstract starts with the date on which the offence took place, the date of the conviction &c. being at the end of the entry. There are many records of recusants, that is Protestants and Roman Catholics who failed to attend Church of England services. These abstracts, prepared by John Cordy Jeaffreson for the Middlesex County Record Society, are far from being a complete calendar of these extensive records; his purpose was, in part, to notice 'every parchment that should exhibit a famous person's name or any other feature of personal interest'. Being unable to print in full the longer lists of the conventiclers and recusants recorded, he ignores 'those persons who appear from their descriptions to have been of humble degree'.

STOOKES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Middlesex Recusants
 (1625-1666)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1717)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 8 November 1717.

STOOKES. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters and Apprentices
 (1717)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

STOOKES. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

STOOKES. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
1 | 2Next page

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.