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Standen Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'standen'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 327 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Courtroll of the manor of Bledlow, Buckinghamshire (1246)
King's College, Cambridge, has a series of courtrolls relating to the English possessions of the Norman abbey of Bec. The earliest of these (C 1), a single membrane, contains the records of manorial courts from Hockday term 1246, Martinmas term 1247 (though extending through to the following Lammas), and 1249. F. W. Maitland selected pleas from this roll, transcribed them into extended Latin, with an English translation facing, and they were published in 1889 by the Selden Society. Maitland's translation anglicizes or modernizes the surnames, so we have confined our index to the Latin; but that is not without its difficulties, because the 13th-century clerk often latinizes what would have been indigenous English surnames (such as 'de Arbore' for Tree or Attree). This court was held 12 May 1246.

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Courtroll of the manor of Bledlow, Buckinghamshire
 (1246)
Lancashire and Cheshire tenants, patrons and friends of Whalley abbey (1178-1350)
About to leave for the Holy Land in 1178, John, constable of Chester, founded an abbey at Stanlawe (Stanlow) in Cheshire, endowing it with the townships of Staneye (Stanney) and Aston. Inundated by the sea at Stanlow, the monastery was removed to Whalley in Lancashire in 1294, and this foundation of Cistercians (grey monks) became one of the wealthiest in northern England. It received grants of lands in Ince, Garston, Childewall, Aykebergh, Little Woolton and Warrington in southwest Lancashire; Eccles, Barton, Maunton, Swynton, Pendleton, Worsley, Hulton, Westhalghton, Rumworth, Pendlebury, Cadishead and Denton in the south; Spotland, Chadwick, Castleton, Marland, Todmorden, Rochdale, Whitworth, Heley, Falenge, Chaderton, Wardle, Howarth and Saddleworth in the east; Wytton, Derwent, Plesyngton, Balderston, Salebury, Read, Downham, Clithero, Ribchester, Withnall, Wheelton and Stanworth in Blackburn hundred; and Warton, Carleton, Steyninges, Elswick and Preston in Amounderness hundred; as well as further property in Cheshire, in Chester, Nantwich, Northwich, Aston, Backford, Walton and Wynlaton. A careful copy of all these grants was compiled in the 14th century in what is called the Coucher Book or C(h)artulary of Whalley Abbey. The evidence had been carefully sorted and collated in twenty chapters or titles, each containing a transcript of the grants and evidences relating to a separate parish or township. The people that appear in these deeds are the donors, the witnesses, and occasionally tenants or occupiers of adjoining plots of land. The Coucher Book was edited for the Chetham Society by W. A. Hulton, and published in four volumes, starting in 1847.

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Lancashire and Cheshire tenants, patrons and friends of Whalley abbey
 (1178-1350)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Claro wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Aldborough, Boroughbridge, Knaresborough and Wetherby.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Claro wapentake
 (1379)
English knights at Agincourt (1415)
At the battle of Agincourt, 25 October 1415, English forces under king Henry V inflicted a signal defeat on the French forces led by the Constable D'Albret. The English are said to have numbered about 15,000 men. This list of 'The Names of the Dukes, Erles, Barons, Knights, Esquires, Serviteurs and others that wer withe the Excellent Prince King Henry the Fifte at the Battell of Agincourt' is of the leaders of the English forces and of the knights (lances) in their retinues: of the archers, for which the battle is famous, hardly a handful are named. Nicholas Harris Nicolas, the antiquarian, found this list accidentally among the manuscripts in the British Museum, and published it, with an extensive account of the battle, in 1827.

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English knights at Agincourt
 (1415)
Lancashire Feet of Fines (1377-1509)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Lancashire. These abstracts were prepared by William Farrer for the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society and published in 1905, under the title 'Final Concords of the County of Lancaster, from the Original Chirographs, or Feet of Fines, preserved amongst the Palatinate of Lancaster Records in the Public Record Office'. They cover the period from John duke of Lancaster to the end of the reign of king Henry VII. In addition, there are abstracts of fines paid for various Lancashire writs from 1377 to 1509, and a fine of 1195 that had been discovered during the preparation of the volume.

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Lancashire Feet of Fines
 (1377-1509)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Priests Secular (1510)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i.e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 21 December 1510, by Thomas Panados (Pavados) suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Priests Secular (1510)
Taxpayers in Sussex (1524-1525)
By Act of Parliament of 1523 (14 & 15 Hen. III, c. 16) a general subsidy was raised, spread over four years, from laymen, clergy and peers. In each of the first two years 1s in the was raised from annual income from land; 1s in the on capital goods worth over 2 and under 20; and a flat payment of 4d on goods worth from 1 to 2, and also by persons aged 16 and upwards in receipt of 1 per annum in wages. In the third year a further shilling in the pound was payable on land worth 50 and upwards a year; and in the fourth year a shilling in the pound on goods worth 50 and upwards. To raise this revenue, returns were required from every hundred, parish or township. In Sussex, the returns for 1524 and 1525 cover the city of Chichester (divided into Estrata, Westrata, Southstrata, North[strata] and Palenta), the borough of Midhurst, and then the rest of the county divided into rapes, within those into hundreds, and within those into boroughs, tithings, liberties, townships or parishes. It is important to note that the cinque ports of Hastings, Rye and Winchelsea were exempt from the subsidy, except for alien inhabitants; and that the town of Westbourne was also exempted 'as the town was lately destroyed by fire'. Aliens are noted as such, sometimes with nationality; and Brighthelmstone (Brighton), which had been burnt by the French in 1514, is only represented fragmentarily. The Sussex Record Society published this transcript and edition by Julian Cornwall of the 1524 and 1525 returns: the 1524 return was used for the main transcript where possible, names peculiar to the 1524 lists being marked with an asterisk, and those with amendments in 1524 with a dagger. At the foot of each 1524 return the new names from 1525 are given. Only the amount of the assessment is printed (m. = marks). Letters prefixed to the sum give the basis of the assessment, no letter (or G) meaning that it was on goods - A, annual wages; D, annual wages of day-labourers; F, fees or salaries of office; L, lands; P, profits; W, wages; x, no basis stated.

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Taxpayers in Sussex
 (1524-1525)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1550-1552)
The Privy Council of Edward VI was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1550-1552)
Officers of the Royal Household (1553)
King Edward VI died 6 July 1553 and was buried 8 August following. The accounts of the funeral expenses were prepared by sir Edward Waldegrave, knight, one of queen Mary's privy coucil, and master of her Majesty's great wardrobe. The expenses included the purchase of 'blacke clothe boughte for the buriall' to furnish mourning for every officer and servant of the late king's household, and these accounts list all the officers, department by department, by name. Most officers were provided with 4 yards of cloth, and their clerks and servants 3 yards each: greater dignitaries were allowed from 7 to 16 yards; sir Edward himself received 10. The total cost of the 9,376 and a half yards of cloth was 5946 9s 9d.

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Officers of the Royal Household
 (1553)
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