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Rope Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'rope'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 74 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Essex Charters (1280-1289)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Essex Charters
 (1280-1289)
Close Rolls (1302-1307)
The close rolls of the 31st to 35th years of the reign of king Edward I, that is to the day of his death (7 July 1307), record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. In amongst this official material, the rolls were also used as a way of recording many acknowledgments of private debts and contracts between individuals. Most of the contents relate to England, but there are also entries concerning Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1302-1307)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Tickhill wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Tickhill.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Tickhill wapentake
 (1379)
English administration in Ireland (1392-1393)
This roll of proceedings of the King's Council in Ireland from June 1392 to April 1393, in the 16th year of the reign of Richard II, survived among the archives of the Marquis of Ormode; it was transcribed by the Reverend James Graves, and published in 1877 as a volume in the Chronicles and Memorials series. Part of the record is in Latin, part in French, and Graves provided translations into English for all the French text. The record is mainly of commissions, letters of protection, and fiats for registration on the Patent Roll. Some related documents from the British Museum and the Public Record Office are transcribed in the appendix, including an inspeximus of 1444 with the names of burgesses of Drogheda.

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English administration in Ireland
 (1392-1393)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1458-1471)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of popes Pius II and Paul II. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Many of the names in the text were clearly a puzzle to the scribes in Rome, and spelling of British and Irish placenames and surnames is chaotic.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1458-1471)
Taxpayers in Sussex (1524-1525)
By Act of Parliament of 1523 (14 & 15 Hen. III, c. 16) a general subsidy was raised, spread over four years, from laymen, clergy and peers. In each of the first two years 1s in the was raised from annual income from land; 1s in the on capital goods worth over 2 and under 20; and a flat payment of 4d on goods worth from 1 to 2, and also by persons aged 16 and upwards in receipt of 1 per annum in wages. In the third year a further shilling in the pound was payable on land worth 50 and upwards a year; and in the fourth year a shilling in the pound on goods worth 50 and upwards. To raise this revenue, returns were required from every hundred, parish or township. In Sussex, the returns for 1524 and 1525 cover the city of Chichester (divided into Estrata, Westrata, Southstrata, North[strata] and Palenta), the borough of Midhurst, and then the rest of the county divided into rapes, within those into hundreds, and within those into boroughs, tithings, liberties, townships or parishes. It is important to note that the cinque ports of Hastings, Rye and Winchelsea were exempt from the subsidy, except for alien inhabitants; and that the town of Westbourne was also exempted 'as the town was lately destroyed by fire'. Aliens are noted as such, sometimes with nationality; and Brighthelmstone (Brighton), which had been burnt by the French in 1514, is only represented fragmentarily. The Sussex Record Society published this transcript and edition by Julian Cornwall of the 1524 and 1525 returns: the 1524 return was used for the main transcript where possible, names peculiar to the 1524 lists being marked with an asterisk, and those with amendments in 1524 with a dagger. At the foot of each 1524 return the new names from 1525 are given. Only the amount of the assessment is printed (m. = marks). Letters prefixed to the sum give the basis of the assessment, no letter (or G) meaning that it was on goods - A, annual wages; D, annual wages of day-labourers; F, fees or salaries of office; L, lands; P, profits; W, wages; x, no basis stated.

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Taxpayers in Sussex
 (1524-1525)
Cheshire gentry and their ancestors (1580-1613)
Richard St George, Norroy King of Arms, and Henry St George, Bluemaster Pursuivant of Arms, of the College of Arms, conducted a heraldic visitation of Cheshire in 1612 and 1613, recording pedigrees of gentlemen claiming the right to bear coats of arms. A copy of their visitation was elaborated by the addition of other Cheshire pedigrees in Harleian Manuscript 1535: and this manuscript was edited by sir George J. Armytage and John Paul Rylands for publication by the Harleian Society in 1909. It has a large number of pedigrees of Cheshire gentry, with a few brief abstracts from early documents; and the pedigrees of some offshoots from old Cheshire stocks which had taken root in other counties. The pedigrees largely relate to the period back from 1613 to the previous visitation of 1580, but there is also some older material, particularly back into the 15th century. In most cases each pedigree is prefixed by a heraldic description of the coat of arms. The printed volume also includes (pages 1 to 4) a list of Cheshire men who disclaimed the right to bear a coat of arms at the 1613 visitation, taken from Harleian Manuscript 1070.

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Cheshire gentry and their ancestors
 (1580-1613)
Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences (1606-1616)
Licences for intended marriages in Chester archdeaconry, which covered Cheshire and Lancashire south of the Ribble (by far the most populous part of that county)

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Lancashire and Cheshire Marriage Licences
 (1606-1616)
Suffolk householders (1674)
Hearth tax was raised by assessing each householder on the number of chimneys to the dwelling. This provided a simple way to make a rough judgment as to the value of the dwelling: paupers were issued exemption certificates, but they too were listed at the end of each return. The returns were made by township, grouped by hundred. A complete copy of the hearth tax return for each shire was sent to the Exchequer: this is the return for Suffolk for Lady Day (25 March) 1674 (E 179/257/14) as printed in 1905 as Suffolk Green Book no xi, vol. 13. The numbers given are the numbers of hearths: where two or more people are grouped together with one number, it may be assumed that they were heads of separate households sharing a single building with that number of chimneys.

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Suffolk householders
 (1674)
Treasury Books (1689-1692)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies.

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Treasury Books
 (1689-1692)
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