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Rockell Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'rockell'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 18 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Suffolk (1568)
By Act of Parliament of December 1566 a subsidy of 8d in the on moveable goods and 4s in the on the annual value of land was raised from the lay (as opposed to clergy) population. These are the returns for Suffolk, printed in 1909 in the Suffolk Green Book series.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1568)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1619-1657)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Sessions Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county.

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1619-1657)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1581-1700)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Rolls. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county, with presentments, petitions, and recognizances to appear as witnesses: many of the records concern the county authorities dealing with regulation of alehouses, religious conventicles, absence from church, highways, poaching, profanation of the Sabbath, exercising trades without due apprenticeship &c. Unlike the Sessions Books, the decisions of the justices are not recorded on the rolls, which serve more as a record of evidence and allegations. Where the date of a roll is given with an asterisk, it indicates that that particular document was not then in the county muniments, but in the archives of the Marquess of Salisbury (whose ancestors had served as Custos Rotulorum) at Hatfield House. This is a calendar of abstracts of extracts: it is by no means a completely comprehensive record of the surviving Hertfordshire sessions rolls of the period, but coverage is good.

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1581-1700)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1658-1700)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county: numerically, the the most cases (759) concerned not attending church; presentments about repairs to roads and bridges (247); unlicensed and disorderly alehouses (226); assault (156); badgers, higlers, &c., trading without licence (142); and trading without due apprenticeship (117). This calendar gives abstracts of all entries in the Sessions Books and Minute Books for Hertfordshire sessions for the period.

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1658-1700)
National ArchivesApprentices (1766)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 6 July to 31 December 1766.

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Apprentices
 (1766)
Inhabitants of London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet. Private Residences'. About 10,000 people are recorded.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1805)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.

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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
National ArchivesInhabitants of Newington in Surrey (1851)
The 1851 census return for St Mary Newington, Surrey, registration district: St Peter Walworth sub-district: enumeration district 20: described as: "All that Part of the Parish of St. Mary Newington, which Comprises George St. (both sides), Richmond St. (East side), East St. (south side) to Pleasant Place, Including Pleasant Place, Belgrade Place (both sides) & Nottingham Walk". This area lay in the ecclesiastical district of St Peter Walworth, and in the borough of Lambeth. HO 107/1567. The addresses listed in the actual returns are 1 to 40 and 60 to 62 George Street (including Pear Tree Cottage and Trafalgar Cottage); 1 to 22 Richmond Street (including Richmond Cottage); 3 Little George Street; 1 to 10 East Street; 1 to 4 Pleasant Row (including White Cottage); 1 to 16 Belgrave (Belgrade) Place; Brights Cottage; 1 to 3 East Lane; Southampton Cottage; 2 to 3 Sandford Row; and 1 Sandford Cottages.

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Inhabitants of Newington in Surrey
 (1851)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Newington St Mary (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Newington St Mary
 (1861)
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