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Ring Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'ring'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 331 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Liberate Rolls (1245-1251)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 30th to 35th years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1245-1251)
Deeds from Bath in Somerset (1280-1289)
More than 500 mediaeval deeds survived in the muniment chest of Bath in Somerset, almost all dealing with the transfers of small plots of land in the city. Each names the grantor and grantee, describes the land, and is witnessed by other citizens. This printed edition was prepared by the Reverend C. W. Shickle, Master of St John's Hospital in Bath. Where (as in many cases) the earliest deeds were undated, he was able to assign periods to each on the basis of style and content, particularly the names of witnesses.

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Deeds from Bath in Somerset
 (1280-1289)
Wiltshire freeholders (1625-1645)
Inquisitions post mortem were held after the death of freeholders who held their estates in capite or in chief, i. e., directly from the crown. The inquisition, held by the royal escheator upon the oath of jurors from the county who were also normally freeholders, recorded what estates the deceased had held, by what tenure, what they were worth, the date of death, who was the next heir, and whether the heir was of age. The sample scan shows an unusually brief inquisition: these abstracts usually run to two or three pages of print.

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Wiltshire freeholders
 (1625-1645)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1649)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1649)
The Founders of New Plymouth (1620-1651)
(New) Plymouth colony was settled 120 Puritan families from England who landed there in 1620. New Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay were united in 1692 as Massachusetts. The manuscript volume in which the earliest records of the colony are entered is entitled "Plymouth Colony Records, Deeds, &c., Vol. I, 1627-1661" and "Book of Indian Records for their Lands". This book was edited by David Pulsifer and published in 1861 by order of the legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The principal contents are records of the establishment of the colony, the initial land grants, distribution of the few cattle brought across the Atlantic, and the subsequent deeds by which land transfers took place, and servants were indentured.

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The Founders of New Plymouth
 (1620-1651)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1669)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1669)
Landowners in Jamaica (1670)
The State Papers Colonial Series, America and West Indies, 1669 to 1674, preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, were edited by W. Noel Sainsbury, Assistant Keeper of the Public Records, and published under the direction of the Master of the Rolls and with the sanction of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonial Department in 1889. Over 200,000 acres of land in Jamaica had been granted out to a total of 717 families: the Governor, sir Thomas Modyford, transmitted this survey 'by the extraordinary diligence of his Majesty's Receiver-General', listing patentees by parish, giving full name and acreage, to Secretary of State sir Henry Bennet, the Earl of Arlington, 23 September 1670. The population of these rural areas was calculated at 11,898; there being, in addition, about 3,300 persons in the towns of Port Royal and St Jago.

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Landowners in Jamaica 
 (1670)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1669-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1669-1679)
Boys entering Rugby School (1681)
This edition of Rugby School Register was published in 1933: the volume covering 1675 to 1857 contains 6480 entries, based on the original school admission registers, but elaborated with general biographical information wherever the editor was able to do so. The entries for the 17th and early 18th centuries are much less detailed than those for later years. The arrangement of the fullest entries was to give the boy's full name (surname first, in bold); whether eldest, second, &c., son; father's name and address as of when the boy entered school; the boy's age at entry and birthday; name of the house (in the school) to which he belonged; then a brief general biography; and date and place of death.

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Boys entering Rugby School
 (1681)
Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors (1673-1692)
The only surviving complete volume of the records of the courts held by the Governor and Assistants of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay is for the period 1673 to 1692. It was transcribed by John Noble, and published by order of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Boston, New England, as County Commissioners of the County of Suffolk, Massachusetts. Under English law overseas colonies were generally deemed to fall under the jurisdiction of the Admiralty, and were subject to English law varied by local circumstances. These Courts of Assistants therefore also function as Courts of Admiralty; the courts had jurisiction over criminal cases and also in civil disputes between parties. In practice, many of the names that occur in the record are just those of the members of the grand jury and the lesser juries (appointed from among the adult male householders of the colony) before whom the cases were tried.

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Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors
 (1673-1692)
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