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Riggs Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'riggs'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 173 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Retired monks, nuns and chantry priests in the east Midlands (1547-1551)
Lists of pensions being paid to monks, nuns and chantry priests in the diocese of Lincoln after the dissolution of the monasteries and chantries. The diocese covered Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, part of Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Leicestershire and Lincolnshire. Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Rutland, which had been shorn from the diocese, are not covered by these returns.

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Retired monks, nuns and chantry priests in the east Midlands
 (1547-1551)
Secretary of State's Papers (1600)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1600)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Official Papers (1603-1610)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Scotland, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1603-1610)
British in the East (1630-1634)
The East India State Papers centre on the records of the East India Company, trading to India, the East Indies, Persia and China. They include the Court Minutes of the East India Company.

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British in the East
 (1630-1634)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham (1626-1638)
Sexual and religious behaviour, marriage and probate were under the purview of the ecclesiastical courts in England at this period, exercised through the individual dioceses and archdeaconries. The diocese of Durham included the whole of county Durham, Northumberland (except for Hexhamshire) and Alston in Cumberland. The High Commission Court dealt with cases from the whole diocese, and a book of court acts from 1628 to 1639, and another of depositions from 1626 to 1638, survived in the dean and chapter library, were edited by W. Hylton Dyer Longstaffe, and published by the Surtees Society in 1858. This is not a complete abstract of the record: there are hundreds of cases for contempt of the ordinary jurisdiction, of which only a few were selected as examples 'in consequence of the rank of the persons proceeded against or other contents of interest'. However, all cases in which the nature of the offence occurs are traced from start to finish, but omitting much of the proceedings in between. The names and ages of all the deponents are recorded.

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Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham
 (1626-1638)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1645)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1645)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1647)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1647)
Besiegers of Colchester (1648)
The siege of Colchester was one of the most severe of the Civil War, and lasted from 14 June to 28 August 1648. Kent and Essex Royalists on their way into Norfolk and Suffolk turned aside into Colchester, hoping to get recruits there. Fairfax pursued from his headquarters in London, and when on 12 June he appeared with 5,000 men they were obliged to make hasty preparations for defence. The town was ill-fitted to stand a siege, and the 4,000 Royalist troops were most of them newly levied and ill-armed, but after a repulse on 14 June 14, Fairfax realized that a long siege was inevitable, and busied himself with raising forts to completely isolate the town. On 2 July the work of circumvallation was finished, and though meeting with fierce resistance, Fairfax gained post after post. Early in August famine added to the misery of the besieged, and the citizens began to clamour for surrender. On 19 August, Norwich, the Royalist leader, asked for terms; negotiations went on for some days, and finally on 28 August, Fairfax occupied the town. Three of the Royalist leaders were shot, and the soldiers were sent to labour in the West Indies, or to enforced military service under the Venetian Republic. The townsmen were made to pay a heavy fine. These accounts list disbursements to workmen digging the fortifications and to artificers, soldiers and officers involved in the siege. The total sum paid was about 1,695.

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Besiegers of Colchester
 (1648)
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