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Rew Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'rew'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 136 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Northamptonshire Lay Subsidy: Culworth (1543)
The lay subsidy for Culworth, Northamptonshire, (Exchequer Lay Subsidy 156/183), of the 35th year of king Henry VIII lists taxpayers in the parish by assessment of their lands or goods.

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Northamptonshire Lay Subsidy: Culworth
 (1543)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Inhabitants of Somerset (1607-1625)
The Reverend E. H. Bates prepared extracts from the Somerset quarter session records of 1607 to 1625 for publication by the Somerset Record Society (xxiii) in 1907. The period is covered by quarter sessions minute book 1 (1613 to 1620) and part of book 2 (1620-1627); these are based on the rolls of recognizances (taken, discharged and forfeited); criminal indictments (not touched on in Bates's extracts); and sessions rolls 1 to 16 (abstracted by A. J. Monday). The records covered and illustrated by these extracts are introduced under the heads Sessions Business; Relief of the Poor; Apprentices, Bastards and Lunatics; Charities (Alms- and Pest-Houses); Housing the Poor; Roads and Bridges; Rates and Appeals; Houses of Correction; and Drink Traffic.

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Inhabitants of Somerset
 (1607-1625)
Commanders for the Summer Expedition: Navy Royal (1645)
'A List of such of the Navy Royal, as also of the Merchants Ships as are set forth to Sea for this Summers Expedition [31 May] 1645, in the Service of the King and Parliament. Together with their Names, Captains, Burdens, Bumber of Men and Ordnance in every Ship'.

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Commanders for the Summer Expedition: Navy Royal
 (1645)
Official Papers (1645-1647)
The State Papers Domestic are the main series of records of internal British administration for this period. The volumes printed in abstract here (Charles I dx to dxv) run from July 1645 to December 1647, a period of defeat of royal power by the parliamentary forces. Parliament's victory at Naseby in June 1645 led to the collapse of the Royalist cause and the imprisonment of the king in Carisbrooke Castle towards the close of 1647. During all these events the administration of government continued, largely using the same institutions, leaving similar series of records as before: but executive power is now represented in these books by the Committee of Both Kingdoms (England and Scotland). The State Papers Domestic for these years are largely concerned with the prosecution of hostilities, the movements and supply of troops, and the treatment of 'delinquents'. Chronologically interleaved with the abstracts of the main volumes are details from the series of Proceedings of the Committee of Both Kingdoms, but these are lost for the years 1646 to 1647, brief notes only surviving in the Indexes to the Day Book of Orders. There are also appendices relating to the victualling and disposition of the Navy, taken from the Letters and Papers of the Committee for the Admiralty and the Committe of the Navy, which also include some petitions from sailors, victuallers, officials, or their dependants, seeking redress or relief.

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Official Papers
 (1645-1647)
Wandsworth Burials (1658)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.

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Wandsworth Burials
 (1658)
Official Papers (1675-1676)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1675-1676)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1658-1700)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county: numerically, the the most cases (759) concerned not attending church; presentments about repairs to roads and bridges (247); unlicensed and disorderly alehouses (226); assault (156); badgers, higlers, &c., trading without licence (142); and trading without due apprenticeship (117). This calendar gives abstracts of all entries in the Sessions Books and Minute Books for Hertfordshire sessions for the period.

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1658-1700)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Exeter in Devon (1710-1712)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. May 1710 to January 1712. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Shropshire return)

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Apprentices registered at Exeter in Devon
 (1710-1712)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
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