Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Malon Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'malon'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

Buy all
Get all 9 records to view, to save and print for £54.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Inhabitants of Manchester (1590)
The Court Leet and View of Frankpledge of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire was held twice a year on the first Thursdays after Easter and Michaelmas. The record of each court starts with a list of the jurors, and then records the deaths of tenants and burgesses, with the names of their heirs, who were to do suit to the court; and transfers of burgages by sale, and homage of new burgesses. Then there are presentments of all manner of minor enroachments and misdemeanours, such as blocking of ditches, stopping of highways, noisome drains, &c. Finally there are new general ordinances, often with the appointment of officers to see that they are enforced. Every Michaelmas saw the swearing in of a long list of officers for the coming year, including the borough reeve, constables, market lookers, mise layers and gatherers, sealers of leather, officers for fruit and wholesome bread and (the prevention of) football, aletasters, bylawmen (burleymen), scavengers, (ap)praisers, catchpole, swineherd, and also the affeerers, who judged the fines to be levied by the court. The sample scan is taken from 1597. This index covers the court of 1 October 1590.

MALON. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Manchester
 (1590)
Official Papers (1598-1601)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

MALON. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Official Papers
 (1598-1601)
Official Papers (1683-1684)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. This covers October 1683 to April 1684.

MALON. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Official Papers
 (1683-1684)
Masters of Merchantmen at Charleston (1788)
The custom house at Charleston, South Carolina, reported ships entered inwards, cleared outwards and sailed. These give the type of vessel, the name of the vessel, surname of the master, and (for ships arriving) whence they had come, or (for ships departing) their proposed destination. Most of the traffic was with other American ports (over 700 ships a year), Britain (about 150), and the West Indies.

MALON. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of Merchantmen at Charleston (1788)
Owners of Merchantmen (1804)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), or copper fastened (c f) or copper bolted (c b), sometimes with a date, such as (17)88. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1804, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repairs; len. lengthened; lrp. large repairs; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; S. rprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough Repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel. Where the vessel was armed, the number of guns is given, and occasionally a remark such as 'captured' will appear. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was United States property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; some were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second; I., third - O and U for fourth and fifth are never used) and its stores (1, first; 2, second; 3, third) and the year of survey, e. g. 00 for 1800, or, if surveyed during 1803, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to owners in the main list and the supplement.

MALON. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Owners of Merchantmen
 (1804)
Dominica Slave Owners (1838)
Slavery was abolished throughout the British Empire by act of Parliament in 1833. This list, published in 1838, gives details of compensation paid to owners who had suffered by the emancipation of their slaves after abolition. The table gives the date of the award, the number of the claim, the full name of the party to whom payment was awarded, the number of slaves, and the sum paid. Few masters had owned more than 100 slaves; most of the claimants had only a few. The cost of the loss of a single slave was generally assessed at about 20. There were 1030 claims from Dominica, including some that were abandoned, disallowed, or still unsettled because of litigation.

MALON. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Dominica Slave Owners (1838)
English lawyers (1841)
The Royal Kalendar has a Law Department listing justices and officials of the High Court of Chancery; Masters in Chancery; Crown Office; Six Clerks Office; Register Office in Chancery Lane; Office of Reports and Entries; Affidavit Office; Hanaper Office; Examiner's Office; Petty Bag and Cursitors Office; Subpoena Office; Lord Chancellors officers; Vice-Chancellor's officers; officers to the Master of the Rolls; the Public Record Office at Rolls House; the Court of Bankruptcy; the Court for Relief of Insolvent Debtors; Court of Queen's Bench; Court of Common Pleas; Court of Exchequer; Exchequer Office of Pleas; Register of Deeds in the county of Middlesex; Queen's Sergeants and Counsel; Duchy Court of Lancaster; County Palatine of Lancaster; and County Palatine of Durham; Marshalsea and Palace-Court; Court of Westminster; with lists of the Lord Lieutenants and Sheriffs in England and Wales; and officials of the Inns of Court. There is also a list of the committee of the Law Society of the United Kingdom.

MALON. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
English lawyers
 (1841)
Inhabitants of county Armagh (1888)
Bassett's Book of Antrim is a directory listing traders, farmers and private residents in the county, with notes on local manufacture and for anglers and sportsmen.

MALON. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of county Armagh
 (1888)
Naturalizations (1922)
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization had been granted by the Secretary of State and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered in the Home Office. These notices, from January to December 1922, refer to naturalizations from December 1921 to November 1922. In January the list gave full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; place of residence; and occupation. From February onwards the format was changed - full name (surname first) with any aliases; country of origin; occupation; full postal address; date of taking the oath. A dagger indicates re-admission to British nationality; an asterisk that the person had served in H.M.'s Forces.

MALON. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Naturalizations
 (1922)

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.