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Jury Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'jury'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 148 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Rich English Pilgrims in Rome (1506)
Registers of English pilgrims staying in Rome, preserved among the archives of the English College, were extracted by W. C. Trevelyan and communicated to the Rev. John Hodgson, who published them in 1838. Two separate lists were maintained - of the rich and nobles, and of the poor. Both lists give date, full name, and diocese of origin in England and Wales.

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Rich English Pilgrims in Rome
 (1506)
Officers of the Royal Household (1553)
King Edward VI died 6 July 1553 and was buried 8 August following. The accounts of the funeral expenses were prepared by sir Edward Waldegrave, knight, one of queen Mary's privy coucil, and master of her Majesty's great wardrobe. The expenses included the purchase of 'blacke clothe boughte for the buriall' to furnish mourning for every officer and servant of the late king's household, and these accounts list all the officers, department by department, by name. Most officers were provided with 4 yards of cloth, and their clerks and servants 3 yards each: greater dignitaries were allowed from 7 to 16 yards; sir Edward himself received 10. The total cost of the 9,376 and a half yards of cloth was 5946 9s 9d.

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Officers of the Royal Household
 (1553)
Traders in Canterbury (1392-1592)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, transcribed and privately printed in 1904 the lists of the Intrantes - those persons, not being free of the city, who paid the annual fine to trade - for the period 1392 to 1592. The names are arranged by ward (Burgate, Newyngate, Westgate, Worgate and Northgate, and give full name, (sometimes) occupation, and fee paid.

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Traders in Canterbury
 (1392-1592)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1646)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1646)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1648)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1648)
Treasury and Customs Records (1685-1688)
Government accounts, with details of income and expenditure in Britain, America and the colonies

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Treasury and Customs Records
 (1685-1688)
Losers (1701)
The London Gazette of this period contained much political news, a few official notices, and a section of Advertisements. The Advertisements are diverse: some seeking to publicize a sale, an event, a publication, or a service; others appealing for help in tracing missing persons, property, or horses; bankruptcy notices &c. We have separated out all this material into different categories for indexing. Each issue of the Gazette was given a four- or five-day date such as '20-24 March'; the actual date of publication would be the last (i. e., 24 March), but modern sources often quote the first (i. e., 20 March). The dates are Old Style, so before 25 March they appear as 1700. We cover issues 3668 (2-6 January 1700/1) to 3770 (25-29 December 1701). This is the index to the victims of all manner of accidental or criminal loss.

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Losers 
 (1701)
Treasury Books (1705-1706)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for April 1705 to September 1706. The text covers a huge variety of topics involving all manner of receipts and expenditure, customs and revenue officials, civil servants, pensioners, petitioners and postmasters figuring particularly among the individuals named.

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Treasury Books
 (1705-1706)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1718)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1718)
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