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Jewry Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'jewry'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 20 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered in Somerset (1741-1745)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Masters of Apprentices registered in Somerset
 (1741-1745)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1700-1752)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county: numerically, the the most cases (240) concerned assaults; presentments about repairs to roads and bridges (67); larceny (63); unlicensed and disorderly alehouses (33); nuisances (28); and trading without due apprenticeship (24). This calendar gives abstracts of all entries in the Sessions Books and Minute Books for Hertfordshire sessions for the period.

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1700-1752)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Tiverton in Devon (1757)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/53

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Apprentices registered at Tiverton in Devon
 (1757)
National ArchivesSailors on board H. M. S. Minotaur (1796-1798)
His Majesty's ship the Minotaur took part in the destruction of the French fleet in Aboukir Bay at the mouth of the Nile ('the Battle of the Nile') on the evening of the 1st and morning of the 2nd August 1798. This is the muster book for 1 August to 30 September 1798: being a continuation book in a series covering wages and victualling from September 1796, it also includes the names of some men who had died, deserted or been discharged from the ship from then to August 1798. Of the ship's complement of 640, this index covers the sailors, volunteers, and boys, as well as the supernumeraries and a group of pilots: but not the marines, or the French prisoners taken after the battle. Usually each man's entry gives his birthplace, and also his age on entering the ship.

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Sailors on board H. M. S. Minotaur
 (1796-1798)
National ArchivesSailors on board H. M. S. Minotaur (1796-1798)
His Majesty's ship the Minotaur took part in the destruction of the French fleet in Aboukir Bay at the mouth of the Nile ('the Battle of the Nile') on the evening of the 1st and morning of the 2nd August 1798. This is the muster book for 1 June to 31 July 1798: being a continuation book in a series covering wages and victualling from September 1796, it also includes the names of some men who had died, deserted or been discharged from the ship from then to June 1798. Of the ship's complement of 640, this index covers the sailors, volunteers, and boys, as well as the supernumeraries; the retinue of sir John Orde, Rear-Admiral of the White; and a group of pilots: but not the marines, or the French prisoners taken after the battle. Usually each man's entry gives his birthplace, and also his age on entering the ship.

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Sailors on board H. M. S. Minotaur
 (1796-1798)
Inhabitants of London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet. Private Residences'. About 10,000 people are recorded.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1805)
Oxford Householders: St Aldate's (1834)
A List of the Freemen and Householders of the City of Oxford, Registered July 31st, 1834, as Entitled to Vote in the Election of Members for the said City. This starts with an alphabetical list of the freemen of the city, which gives (as in the sample scan) full name, address and occupation. Then follow lists of householders, by parish or ward, but without giving occupations.

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Oxford Householders: St Aldate's
 (1834)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1836)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders, in England and Wales

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1836)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1847)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1847, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.

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Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1847)
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