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Members of the Royal Agricultural Society of England (1861)
The list of members of the Royal Agricultural Society gives names and addresses: life members are indicated by a dagger. (The names of 60 members were omitted on account of their subscriptions to the society being in arrear to 31 December 1859). This list is correct to June 1861; as of 11 December of that year there were 84 life governors, 95 annual governors, 1124 life members, 3399 annual members and 17 honorary members, making a total of 4719 names, mostly of landowners and agriculturists.
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Members of the Royal Agricultural Society of England
 (1861)
Boys entering Harrow School (1870)
This First Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; and a synopsis of his career, so far as known.
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Boys entering Harrow School
 (1870)
Law students at Cambridge University (1877)
Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First, Second and Third), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of students with equal marks being bracketed together). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became judges, &c. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)
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Law students at Cambridge University
 (1877)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1880)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1860, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'.
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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1880)
Boys entering Sherborne School (1882)
The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Sherborne School
 (1882)
Boys entering Dover College (1883)
The second edition of the Dover College Register, edited by William Stevens Lee, lists all boys entering the school from its opening in 1871 to the date of publication in 1899. The boys are listed alphabetically by term of entry, surname and full christian names. A double dagger after the name indicates a school prefect. Next comes the year or date of birth, then abbreviations indicating house - [D] day boy; [Sch.] School House; [Sp.] Sparke's House; [St.] Steedman's House; [W.] Walters' from 1881 to 1886, Williams' from 2nd term 1890 to 3rd term 1898; [L.] Littlewood's (the same house as Walters') fom 3rd term 1886 to 1st term 1890. From 3rd term of 1892 onwards the names were changed to [S.] School House; [P.] Priory House (was Sparke's); [M.] St Martin's (was Williams'). Moreover, in January 1893 the Junior School was established at West Mount, and from then onwards [J] indicates a period there. Next come distinctions gained in the school, exhibitions, &c., and athletic distinctions, such as XI for membership of the school cricket eleven, XV for the school football team, with years; then date of leaving; distinctions gained since leaving; and present address (where known) as of 1899. Despite this attempt at comprehensive coverage, the materials to hand for compiling the register were often lacking: at worst, in the early years, there are a handful of entries where only the surname is given. Equally, other entries are detailed and comprehensive.
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Boys entering Dover College
 (1883)
De Bernardy's Unclaimed Money Register (1883)
This register is divided into three parts, under these headings: 1. 'Unclaimed Money. The following persons, or their representatives, are entitled to property'. This is the part covered by this index. 2. 'Australia. Unclaimed Money. The following persons, who went to Australia, if alive, or if dead their representatives, are entitled to property'. Australia is here understood to include New Zealand. 3. 'America. Unclaimed Money. The following persons, who went to America, if alive, or, if dead, their representatives, are entitled to property'. In each case there then follows a list of names, alphabetical by surname (in capitals), and some brief circumstantial details, usually with a year, mostly from 1810 onwards, but with a handful of earlier instances. Anyone thinking they might have a claim to one of these estates was invited to send full details to Messrs De Bernardy Brothers, 28, John-street, Bedford-row, London, to further their claim.
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De Bernardy's Unclaimed Money Register
 (1883)
De Bernardy's Unclaimed Money Register: America (1883)
This register is divided into three parts, under these headings: 1. 'Unclaimed Money. The following persons, or their representatives, are entitled to property'. 2. 'Australia. Unclaimed Money. The following persons, who went to Australia, if alive, or if dead their representatives, are entitled to property'. Australia is here understood to include New Zealand. 3. 'America. Unclaimed Money. The following persons, who went to America, if alive, or, if dead, their representatives, are entitled to property'. In each case there then follows a list of names, alphabetical by surname (in capitals), and some brief circumstantial details, usually with a year, mostly from 1810 onwards, but with a handful of earlier instances. Anyone thinking they might have a claim to one of these estates was invited to send full details to Messrs De Bernardy Brothers, 28, John-street, Bedford-row, London, to further their claim.
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De Bernardy's Unclaimed Money Register: America
 (1883)
Estates of the Deceased (1886)
Distribution of the assets of the deceased: giving the names of the deceased and trustees &c. England and Wales
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Estates of the Deceased
 (1886)
Boys entering Sherborne School (1888)
The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.
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Boys entering Sherborne School
 (1888)
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