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Our indexes include entries for the spelling ackerman. In the period you have requested, we have the following 110 records (displaying 51 to 60): 

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Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain: Country Members (1856)
The membership list of the Pharmaceutical Society was divided into London Members; Country Members; Foreign Life Members; Associates admitted before 1 July 1842; Associates who have passed the Major Examination; and Associates who have passed the Minor Examination. In each case the lists give year of admission; number of certificate (where appropriate); name (surname first, christian name and initials); and address (house number and street name in London, merely town of residence elsewhere). An asterisk before the surname indicates a life member (except in the list of Foreign Life Members). There is also a list of registered apprentices: in this list we have year of registration, full name (surname first); master's name (in the form 'residing with Mr. Smith') and town.
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Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain: Country Members
 (1856)
Traders and professionals in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Commercial and Professional Directory', recording over 100,000 individuals.
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Traders and professionals in London
 (1856)
National ArchivesLondon Policemen (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed separately - this index refers only to the police constables. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from.
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London Policemen
 (1843-1857)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1843-1857)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 4/334) lists policemen joining the force 1 January 1843 to 1 April 1857 (warrant numbers 19893 to 35804). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Although the register was closed for new entrants at the end of 1842, the details of removals were always recorded, some being twenty or more years later. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages. Where a recruit was only recently arrived in the metropolis, the names and addresses of the recommenders can be invaluable for tracing where he came from. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.
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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1843-1857)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1858)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1858, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.
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Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1858)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Bridport (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Bridport
 (1861)
Country Members of the Pharmaceutical Society (1865)
The annual list of Members, Associates and Apprentices of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain includes lists of London Members and Country Members (giving year of membership, number of certificate (if any), full name (surname first), and address: an asterisk indicates a Life Member); Associates admitted before 1 July 1842 (with full name, and where registered); Associates of the Society who had passed the Major Examination and were registered as Pharmaceutical Chemists, and Associates of the Society who had passed the Minor Examination and were registered as Assistants (year of admission, number of certificate, full name, and where registered); and Registered Apprentices (with date of registration, full name, residing with, and town).
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Country Members of the Pharmaceutical Society
 (1865)
Science Schools and Classes: Honours and Advanced Examinations: Class Lists (1869)
The Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education published these class lists giving the names of all the successful candidates in the examination of science schools and classes taken in May 1869. The candidates were of three levels: honours; second stage or advanced examination; third stage or elementary examination. Twenty-three subjects were offered. These are the lists for the honours and advanced examinations. The tables, arranged subject by subject, give the candidate's full name (surname first), age, and occupation - or, in the case of those not yet of working age, father's occupation, preceded by (f.); the name of the school where the candidate was taught the subject; and the name of the teacher. Many candidates sat and were successful in more than one subject, and so appear in more than one list. The subjects are: I. Practical, Plane and Solid Geometry; II. Machine Construction; III. Building Construction; IV. Elementary Mathematics; V. Higher Mathematics; VI. Theoretical Mechanics; VII. Applied Mechanics; VIII. Acoustics, Light, and Heat: IX. Magnetism and Electricity; X. Inorganic Chemistry; XI. Organic Chemistry; XII. Geology; XIII. Mineralogy; XIV. Animal Physiology; XV. Zoology; XVI. Vegetable Anatomy and Physiology; XVII. Systematic and Economic Botany; XVIII. Mining; XIX. Metallurgy; XX. Navigation; XXI. Nautical Astronomy; XXII. Steam; XXIII. Physical Geography.
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Science Schools and Classes: Honours and Advanced Examinations: Class Lists
 (1869)
Innkeepers and Publicans in London south of the Thames (1874)
Henry Downes Miles compiled this London and Suburban Licensed Victuallers', Hotel and Tavern Keepers' Directory, which also had sections listings brewers, maltsters, hop factors, distillers and rectifiers of the United Kingdom.
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Innkeepers and Publicans in London south of the Thames
 (1874)
English Pupil Teachers training to become Schoolmasters (1877)
The Education Department set examinations for candidates for admission into training colleges, and to become teachers. This is the class list (in order of merit) of the pupil teachers who passed that examination at Christmas 1877. The list gives the candidate's name (surname first) (prefixed by an asterisk where he was examined on second-year papers), and the school in which engaged (N. for National School, Ch. Church of England, B. British School, W. Wesleyan, R. Roman Catholic, P. Parochial, Bd. Board School, Indl. Industrial School).
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English Pupil Teachers training to become Schoolmasters
 (1877)
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