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Purdie Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'purdie'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 138 records (displaying 41 to 50): 

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Masters of British Merchantmen (1834)
Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping was established in 1834, following the demise of two earlier societies for registering shipping in Britain. The new register in 1834 was created from an alphabetical list of British ships with no more detail than name, master's name, tonnage, and port to which they belonged. Lloyd's insurance syndicate provided 1000 for the establishment of a new system of surveyors, and as the year progressed many of the entries in the register were then annotated with additional information - type of vessel (Bk, barque; Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; Lr, lugger; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow; Yt, yacht), place and year of build, owners, destined voyage, and classification of the vessel and its stores, with the month (indicated by the final number in the last column) of inspection. Underneath each of these amended entries details were given of construction and repair, with year - s., sheathed; d., doubled; C., coppered; I. B., iron bolts; s. M., sheathed with marine metal; s. Y. M., sheathed with yellow metal; F., felt; PH., patent hair; Cl., clincher; len., lengthened; lrp., large repairs; trp., thorough repairs; ND., new deck; M. TSds., new top-sides; W. C., wales cased; NW., new wales; Srprs, some repairs - and, in italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; Bh, beech; C., cedar; E., elm; F., fir; G., gum; Ght., greenheart; Hk., hackmatack; L., locust; L. O., live oak; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; R. P., red pine; Y. P., yellow pine; S., spruce; T., teak; W. O., white oak. The sample scan is from the main list. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. This is the index to masters in the main list. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. These new masters are also included in this index.

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Masters of British Merchantmen
 (1834)
Glasgow Directory (1835)
'The Post-Office Annual Directory For 1835-56: Containing An Alphabetical List of the Merchants, Traders, Manufacturers, and Principal Inhabitants: And A Second List of the Names of Merchants, Manufacturers and Traders, in Glasgow and Suburbs, Classed and Arranged under Each Distinct Head of Trade or Profession with A Street Directory: And An Appendix, Containing Many Useful Lists' was published in Glasgow in 1835. This main alphabetical section is from page 21 to 253, and comprises about 11,000 entries.

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Glasgow Directory
 (1835)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
British in India and Ceylon, China and Australasia (1837)
Births, marriages and deaths, civil, ecclesiastical and military promotions, furloughs, reports of shipping to and from England and the East, with passenger lists, and news items published in the Asiatic Journal

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British in India and Ceylon, China and Australasia
 (1837)
Insolvents (1840)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1840)
Calcutta Brides (1843)
The Indian Mail, 'A Monthly Register for British & Foreign India, China, & Australasia' commenced publication 9 May 1843 as a continuation of the digest of Eastern intelligence that thitherto had formed a part of the Asiatic Journal. The Register section contained notices of births, marriages and deaths from the presidencies of Calcutta (extending across northern India, and into Burma), Madras, and Bombay (including Aden), as well as Australasia, Ceylon, China, Cape of Good Hope, Mauritius, and Singapore.

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Calcutta Brides
 (1843)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1843)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders, in England and Wales

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1843)
Dissolutions of partnerships in England and Wales (1845)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of dissolutions of partnerships gazetted in England and Wales. The names of the partners are given in full, surnames in capitals, followed by trade and address, and date of the end of the partnership. Each entry usually ends with the phrase 'Debts by ...', indicating which partner intended to continue, and resume the responsibilities of, the business. This is the index to the names of the partners, from the issues from January to December 1845.

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Dissolutions of partnerships in England and Wales
 (1845)
Medical Practitioners supporting Temperance (1849)
'Temperance and Teetotalism: An Inquiry into the Effects of Alcoholic Drinks on the Human System in Health and Disease' by William B. Carpenter, M. D., F. R. S., F. G. S., Examiner in Physiology in the University of London, and Lecturer on Physiology at the London Hospital, was published in 1849 in Glasgow. Over 2000 medical practitioners subscribed to this statement: 'We, the undersigned, are of opinion - 1. That a very large proportion of human misery, including poverty, disease, and crime, is induced by the use of alcoholic or fermented liquors as beverages. 2. That the most perfect health is compatible with total abstinence from all such intoxicating beverages, whether in the form of ardent spirits, or as wine, beer, ale, porter, cider, etc., etc. 3. That persons accustomed to such drinks may, with perfect safety, discontinue them entirely, either at once, or gradually after a short time. 4. That total and universal abstinence from alcoholic beverages of all sorts would greatly contribute to the health, the prosperity, the morality, and the happiness of the human race.'

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Medical Practitioners supporting Temperance
 (1849)
Inhabitants of Birmingham (1850)
Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns. This long alphabetical section lists inhabitants of Birmingham.

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Inhabitants of Birmingham
 (1850)
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