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Chisnall Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'chisnall'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 62 records (displaying 21 to 30): 

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Inhabitants of Bolton-le-Moors in Lancashire (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Bath). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Bolton-le-Moors in Lancashire
 (1790-1797)
Traders and professionals in London (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory for 1805 to 1807 includes this 'London Alphabet of Businesses, Professions, &c.': coverage is good; about 30,000 individuals are recorded.

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Traders and professionals in London
 (1805)
Inhabitants of Preston in Lancashire (1653-1813)
The records of the three main courts of the borough - the Court Leet, the Mayor's Court and the Inquest or Inquisition of Office - were entered in three thick folio volumes in the municipal archives. Extracts from these, by Anthony Hewitson, a local historian, were published in the Preston Guardian from 16 November 1901 to 19 September 1903, and then revised and printed in this volume in 1905. These extracts necessarily dwell on the quaint and curious, and are mainly from the 17th and early 18th century.

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Inhabitants of Preston in Lancashire
 (1653-1813)
Workers at Ancoats Cotton Twist Company Mill (1818)
The minutes of evidence taken before the Lords Committee on the Cotton Factories Bill include a series of reports by medical men as to the general health of the mill workers in April 1818. For each factory there is a complete list of workers, giving full name, age, how long employed in a factory, health (in general terms, such as 'Good' or 'Sickly'), and any chronic disease or 'distortion', cause and duration - with slight variations from report to report. The physicians examined several hundred people each day, asking such questions as 'Have you any swellings or sores anywhere?', 'Are your limbs straight?', 'Have you a good appetite for food?', 'Do you conceive yourself to be in good health?', and all concluded that the health of the mill workers was good, and that the workers were cheerful. This is the report for David Holt's Ancoats Cotton Twist Co. mill, 21 April 1818.

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Workers at Ancoats Cotton Twist Company Mill
 (1818)
Liverpool Voters: Parish of Liverpool (1832)
A poll for the election of Members of Parliament for the Borough of Liverpool, between William Ewart esquire (E), Lord Viscount Sandon (S), Thomas Thornely esquire (T) and Major-General Sir Howard Douglas, baronet (D), took place on 12 and 13 December 1832. The poll book lists all voters with full name (surname first), occupation, address, and initials indicating for whom they voted. The lists are in six sections: Everton, Kirkdale, the parish of Liverpool, Toxteth Park, West Derby, and Liverpool burgesses and freemen. All householders of property worth 10 a year of more were entitled to vote.

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Liverpool Voters: Parish of Liverpool
 (1832)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1836)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders, in England and Wales

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1836)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the great bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1830-1842)
Merchant Seamen (1844-1853)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. In this volume the register is restarted from 1840 onwards, with the mariner's previous number (if any) being entered in the column after his birthplace. In the event of it becoming known that a man had died during the course of a voyage, that information is written across the remaining empty columns. This volume (BT 112/12) covers mariners whose surnames start with Ce (and McCe), Ch (and McCh) and a handful with Ci.

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Merchant Seamen (1844-1853)
Insolvents in Prison in Ipswich (1853)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette was issued monthly on the 1st of each month. Volume 28, for 1853, comprises issues numbers 325 to 336. The contents, compiled from the official sources, are mainly summaries of proceedings in the bankruptcy and insolvency courts, names of creditors, dissolution of partnerships and similar matters that would be of interest to the commercial world and their solicitors. This section, entitled 'Estates vested in Provisional Assignees' lists insolvents whose cases were dealt with in the Insolvent Court, whether on their own petitions or those of creditors. These twelve monthly issues cover the proceedings of the court from 4 December 1852 to 26 November 1853. Within each session the insolvents are listed alphabetically by surname, with address, occupation, and the name of the prison in which then held.

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Insolvents in Prison in Ipswich
 (1853)
Gentry in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Court Directory', listing alphabetically by surname and christian name the upper class residents of the capital with their postal addresses. 'In order to afford space for the addresses, the abbreviation "esq." for esquire has no longer been appended to each name in the Court Directory. It should be understood that such should be added to the name of every gentleman in the following pages to which no inconsistent addition is affixed.' Decorations, honours &c. are generally given. Some gentlemen appear who are also listed (as professional men, &c.) in the commercial section. Those with second residences in the provinces usually have the country address given as well.

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Gentry in London
 (1856)
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