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Borr Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'borr'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 20 records (displaying 11 to 20): 

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Treasury Books (1712)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1712. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

BORR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Treasury Books
 (1712)
Treasury Books (1713)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1713. Also includes Queen Anne's Civil List (royal expenditure) Lottery papers: payment of the royal servants had fallen two years in arrear: Parliament passed an Act allowing the queen to raise half a million pounds by pledging 32 years' future income: she did this by means of a lottery.

BORR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Treasury Books
 (1713)
Treasury and Customs Officials, Officers and Pensioners (1714)
Government accounts, with details of income and expenditure in Britain, America and the colonies

BORR. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Treasury and Customs Officials, Officers and Pensioners
 (1714)
Treasury Books (1714-1715)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain and the colonies, for August 1714 to December 1715. This is a digest of Treasury Minute Books T29/21-22; Disposition Books T61/22-23; King's Warrants T52/24, 26-29; Order Books T60/8-9; Plantation Auditor Out Letters T64/90; Caveat Book T64/40; Warrants Relating to Money T53/14, 16-25; Warrants Not Relating to Money T54/21-24; Lord Chamberlain's Warrants T56/18; Queen Anne's Debts T56/34; Customs Out Letters T11/16; General Out Letters T27/21-23; Ireland Out Letters T14/9-10; North Britain (Scotland) Out Letters T17/2-3; Affairs of Taxes T22/2; Reference Books T4/8-9; and Register of Papers Read at the Treasury Board T4/19: prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury.

BORR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Treasury Books
 (1714-1715)
Treasury Books (1716)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1716. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

BORR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Treasury Books
 (1716)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Norwich in Norfolk (1715-1717)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1714. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

BORR. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Apprentices registered at Norwich in Norfolk
 (1715-1717)
Treasury Books (1717)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1717. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

BORR. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Treasury Books
 (1717)
Russell family correspondence (1670-1754)
Mrs S. C. Lomas of the Historical Manuscripts Commission prepared this report on the manuscripts of Mrs Frankland-Russell-Astley of Chequers Court in Buckinghamshire, published in 1900. There are a few items included earlier than 1670, and a few later than 1754, but broadly the collection was divided into three groups: 1. Russell and Frankland correspondence 1657 to 1697; 2. Cutts and Revett papers 1687 to 1708; 3. Colonel Charles Russell's letters 1742 to 1754. Sir John Russell was married to Frances, daughter of Oliver Cromwell; their daughter Elizabeth married sir Thomas Frankland. Their son John Russell, governor of Fort William in Bengal, married as his second wife Joanna (niece of Lord Cutts) widow of colonel Edmund Revett; and John's son, colonel Charles Russell married Colonel Revett's daughter, Mary Joanna. The largest part of this collection is the correspondence of Colonel Russell, of the 1st Regiment of Foot, and later of the Coldstream Guards, soldiering in the Netherlands.

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Russell family correspondence
 (1670-1754)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Norwich (1795)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/67

BORR. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Masters of apprentices registered in Norwich
 (1795)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the great bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

BORR. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1830-1842)
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