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Allen Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'allen'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 4164 records (displaying 2801 to 2810): 

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National ArchivesSailors on board Her Majesty's gunboat Cockchafer (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this boat was engaged in 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent.

ALLEN. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Sailors on board Her Majesty's gunboat Cockchafer
 (1860)
Supporters of the Madras Civil Orphan Asylum (1860)
The list of donors and subscribers to the Madras Civil Orphan Asylum, up to 30 June 1860, gives surnames and initials: whether the sum was subscribed annually (anly.) or monthly (mly.) or consisted of donation(s) (don.), in rupees, annas and pies.

ALLEN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Supporters of the Madras Civil Orphan Asylum
 (1860)
Tabular record of Wesleyan mortality (1860)
The Christian Miscellany and Family Visiter, a Wesleyan Methodist monthly published in London, carried, in most issues, a Tabular Record of Mortality, listing recent deaths. The columns of the table are: Name, Residence, [Methodist] Circuit, Age, and Date of Death.

ALLEN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Tabular record of Wesleyan mortality
 (1860)
Theology students at Cambridge University (1860)
Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (First, Second and Third), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together). Students at the first examination are listed as Commencing Bachelors; at the last examination as Middle Bachelors. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)

ALLEN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Theology students at Cambridge University
 (1860)
Boys entering Harrow School (1861)
This First Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; and a synopsis of his career, so far as known.

ALLEN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Boys entering Harrow School
 (1861)
Civil Service Appointments (1861)
The Civil Service Commission published an annual list of all persons who had obtained certificates of qualification for appointment in the various public departments. The list gives full name (surname first); department (such as Post Office, or Inland Revenue); situation (such as Letter-carrier, or Clerk); and date of certificate. Candidates whose names are preceded by a dagger obtained appointments as the result of competition; a double dagger indicates open competition. Those whose names are preceded by an asterisk obtained honorary additions to their certificates either for proficiency in extra subjects chosen by themselves, or for marked proficiency in the prescribed subjects. Then follows a further list of these candidates who had obtained Honorary Additions to their Certificates in this way: giving name (surname and initials); position in the service (department and situation); subjects for which honorary additions were made; and 'extent of knowledge displayed' (such as Creditable, Fair, or Very Creditable). 1 January to 31 December 1861.

ALLEN. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Civil Service Appointments
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Alnwick (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

ALLEN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Alnwick
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Bedford (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

ALLEN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Bedford
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Berwick-upon-Tweed (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

ALLEN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Berwick-upon-Tweed
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Bolton(-le-Moors) (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

ALLEN. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Bolton(-le-Moors)
 (1861)
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