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Wart Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'wart'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 27 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Northumberland (1215-1255)
The register of archbishop Walter Gray of York, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy. The diocese of York at this period covered all of Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, as well as Lancashire north of the Ribble, southern Westmorland, and Hexhamshire in Northumberland. The register survives as two rolls (called the Major and the Minor), in all amounting to nearly 71 feet of parchment. It is thought that a third roll or more has been lost, because the acts of the archbishop for the last ten years of his episcopate are missing, as are all the ordination and ecclesiastical discipline records for his reign. The then unpublished parts of the register were edited for the Surtees Society by James Raine and printed in 1870, with some additional material included in appendices.

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Northumberland
 (1215-1255)
Pontefract Cartulary (1100-1300)
The Cluniac monastery of St John the Evangelist at Pontefract (Pomfret) in the West Riding of Yorkshire, was founded in the 11th century by Robert de Lascy. The grants of land made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which eventually came to Godfrey Wentworth of Woolley Park. This was edited by Richard Holmes and published by Yorkshire Archaeological Society in 1899 and 1902. The individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated: the numbering of the charters is modern, and amounts to 561. The cartulary itself contains 11 fasciculi, to which Holmes gave these section names - I. The Seigniorial Charters; II. The Ecclesiastical Charters; III. Royal Charters and Confirmations; IV. The Local Charters (Pontefract &c.); V. The Ledstone Charters; VI. The Ledsham Charters; VII. Miscellaneous Charters; VIII. The Peckfield and other Charters; IX. and X. Scarborough and other Charters; and XI. Leases to Tenants. Ledston(e), Ledsham and Peckfield are all close to Pontefract, as is most of the property.

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Pontefract Cartulary
 (1100-1300)
Taxpayers in Sussex (1524-1525)
By Act of Parliament of 1523 (14 & 15 Hen. III, c. 16) a general subsidy was raised, spread over four years, from laymen, clergy and peers. In each of the first two years 1s in the was raised from annual income from land; 1s in the on capital goods worth over 2 and under 20; and a flat payment of 4d on goods worth from 1 to 2, and also by persons aged 16 and upwards in receipt of 1 per annum in wages. In the third year a further shilling in the pound was payable on land worth 50 and upwards a year; and in the fourth year a shilling in the pound on goods worth 50 and upwards. To raise this revenue, returns were required from every hundred, parish or township. In Sussex, the returns for 1524 and 1525 cover the city of Chichester (divided into Estrata, Westrata, Southstrata, North[strata] and Palenta), the borough of Midhurst, and then the rest of the county divided into rapes, within those into hundreds, and within those into boroughs, tithings, liberties, townships or parishes. It is important to note that the cinque ports of Hastings, Rye and Winchelsea were exempt from the subsidy, except for alien inhabitants; and that the town of Westbourne was also exempted 'as the town was lately destroyed by fire'. Aliens are noted as such, sometimes with nationality; and Brighthelmstone (Brighton), which had been burnt by the French in 1514, is only represented fragmentarily. The Sussex Record Society published this transcript and edition by Julian Cornwall of the 1524 and 1525 returns: the 1524 return was used for the main transcript where possible, names peculiar to the 1524 lists being marked with an asterisk, and those with amendments in 1524 with a dagger. At the foot of each 1524 return the new names from 1525 are given. Only the amount of the assessment is printed (m. = marks). Letters prefixed to the sum give the basis of the assessment, no letter (or G) meaning that it was on goods - A, annual wages; D, annual wages of day-labourers; F, fees or salaries of office; L, lands; P, profits; W, wages; x, no basis stated.

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Taxpayers in Sussex
 (1524-1525)
The English in Holland and Flanders (1588)
The State Papers Foreign of queen Elizabeth consist mainly of letters and reports concerning England's relations with continental Europe. The inhabitants of the Low Countries were at this period attempting to throw off the Spanish yoke, and Elizabeth sent considerable forces to their aid. The papers relating to Holland and Flanders in the State Papers Foreign are so voluminous in consequence, that a separate calendar was edited by Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B. Hinds under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, this volume, covering January to June 1588, being published in 1931.

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The English in Holland and Flanders
 (1588)
National ArchivesApprentices (1761)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 21 July 1761.

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Apprentices
 (1761)
Inhabitants of Greenock, in Renfrewshire (1805)
Holden's Triennial Directory of 1805 to 1807 included a provincial section, listing professional people and traders in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. (The sample scan here is from the listing for Bath)

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Inhabitants of Greenock, in Renfrewshire
 (1805)
Merchants, Traders and Respectable Inhabitants of Birmingham (1818)
Wrightson's New Triennial Directory of Birmingham included this 'Alphabetical List of the Merchants, Traders and Respectable Inhabitants of the Town'.

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Merchants, Traders and Respectable Inhabitants of Birmingham
 (1818)
Deaths, Marriages, Bankrupts, Dividends and Patents (1819-1820)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, bankrupts and dividends, and patents, as reported in the Monthly Magazine or British Register. Includes some marriages and deaths from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, Bankrupts, Dividends and Patents
 (1819-1820)
Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors (1835)
Principal creditors petitioning to force a bankruptcy (but often close relatives of the bankrupt helping to protect his assets): and solicitors

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Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors
 (1835)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
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