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Vanse Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'vanse'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
Treasury Books (1708)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, from January to December 1708. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

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Treasury Books
 (1708)
Freemen of Canterbury by Birth (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by birth.

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Freemen of Canterbury by Birth
 (1392-1800)
Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to all the stray names in the records: the wives and father-in-laws by whom freedom was acquired; the masters of apprentices; and other persons mentioned by the way in the record.

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Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury
 (1392-1800)
Railway Subscription Contracts (1845)
21,386,703 6s 4d was promised by about 10,000 subscribers of less than 2,000 per contract to the nearly 200 railway bills deposited in the Private Bill Office during the Session of Parliament for 1845. This alphabetical list gives the full names of the subscribers (surname first), description (i. e., occupation), place of abode, a numerical reference to the title of the railway, the amount subscribed to each, and total. There is a separate key to the titles of the railways.

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Railway Subscription Contracts
 (1845)
Pupil Teachers in Yorkshire: Boys (1851)
The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).

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Pupil Teachers in Yorkshire: Boys
 (1851)
Money lenders and other creditors (1880)
Bills of sale transferred title in all property of a debtor to a specified creditor. Possession of a bill of sale thus protected a money lender or other creditor from losing a debtor's property to other creditors (except landlords) in case of insolvency or bankruptcy; and in many cases signing a bill of sale was a required step for a borrower securing a loan. The bill of sale specified the amount thereby secured, but could be open, i. e., allow for further drawings on the same account. Entries from the official register of bills of sales in England and Wales were published in Flint & Co.'s London Manchester and Dublin Mercantile Gazette, a weekly publication available only by subscription, issued under the motto "Security in Crediting". The entries are listed by county, then alphabetically by debtor, surname first, with address, trade, the name of the creditor ('in whose favour'), dates of issue and filing, and amount. An &c. after the amount indicates an open bill. The creditors that appear in the 'in whose favour' column are mainly, but not exclusively, loan companies and individual money lenders, and Jewish names figure prominently among the latter. When a loan was paid off, satisfaction of the bill of sale was entered on the register, and these satisfactions are also recorded in these pages. 1 January to 31 March 1880.

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Money lenders and other creditors
 (1880)
Members of music institutions (1905)
The calendar of the Trinity College of Music, London, for 1905-1906 includes a section listing institutions enrolled in union with the college (throughout the world) with names of secretaries; centres authorised by the board for the holding of local examinations in music, with names of secretaries; and the local centre committees, with names of chairmen, secretaries, and members of their boards.

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Members of music institutions
 (1905)
Metropolitan-Vickers Ex-Apprentices and Ex-Trainees (1950)
The third edition of 'A Register of Ex-Apprentices and Ex-Trainees of the Metropolitan-Vickers Electrical Company Limited' was published in 1950. It contains 10,219 names of those who had been trained at Trafford Park, Manchester, between 1902 and the end of 1949. The compilation was based on the second edition (published in 1939) augmented by the answers to questionnaires, responded to by 74% of those included. Addresses for another 12% were updated. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals and bold) and forename. Then the period at Vickers (e. g., 46-48 for 1946 to 1948); year of birth; then highest career level within the company; and if removed to another company, the name of that (in bold) with year of joining. There are sections for any scholarship, war service, and present address, as of 1950. Names of the deceased are printed in italics. In bold on the left hand side of each entry there is one or more of these abbreviations: C, College Apprentice; E, Special Trainee; k, Killed on Active Service, O. H. M. S.; Ls, Member, M-V. Long Service Association; o, Member, M-V. Overseas Association; P, Probationary College Apprentice; S, School Apprentice; Sp, Special Apprentice; T, Trade Apprentice; V, Vacation Apprentice; w, Member ex-British Westinghouse Association; and *, Present member of the M-V. Company.

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Metropolitan-Vickers Ex-Apprentices and Ex-Trainees
 (1950)
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