Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Tounsend Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'tounsend'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Buy all
Get all 11 records to view, to save and print for £60.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.

TOUNSEND. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London Marriage Allegations
 (1611-1660)
Oxford householders (1665)
Hearth tax was raised by assessing each householder on the number of chimneys to the dwelling. This provided a simple way to make a rough judgment as to the value of the dwelling. In Oxford the returns were made by ward, and then by parish. The return for 1665 (164/154) was edited by J. E. Thorold Rogers and printed for the Oxford Historical Society in 1891. The Roman numerals given are the numbers of hearths: where two or more people are grouped together with one number, it may be assumed that they were heads of separate households sharing a single building with that number of chimneys. Full names are given: only in a few instances is occupation given, nor are the streets indicated; however, there were thirteen ancient parishes in the city, none being very extensive, so a fairly good indication of location is given by the parish name.

TOUNSEND. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Oxford householders
 (1665)
Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors (1673-1692)
The only surviving complete volume of the records of the courts held by the Governor and Assistants of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay is for the period 1673 to 1692. It was transcribed by John Noble, and published by order of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Boston, New England, as County Commissioners of the County of Suffolk, Massachusetts. Under English law overseas colonies were generally deemed to fall under the jurisdiction of the Admiralty, and were subject to English law varied by local circumstances. These Courts of Assistants therefore also function as Courts of Admiralty; the courts had jurisiction over criminal cases and also in civil disputes between parties. In practice, many of the names that occur in the record are just those of the members of the grand jury and the lesser juries (appointed from among the adult male householders of the colony) before whom the cases were tried.

TOUNSEND. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors
 (1673-1692)
Treasury Books (1693-1696)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, from January 1693 to March 1696. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors. The calendar was prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty's Treasury and published in 1935, from letters patent, privy seals, royal sign manuals and warrants, treasury warrants, commissions, orders, letters, memorials, reports and other entries, all not of the nature of Treasury Minutes.

TOUNSEND. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Treasury Books
 (1693-1696)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

TOUNSEND. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Somerset (1723-1726)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1722. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

TOUNSEND. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Apprentices registered in Somerset
 (1723-1726)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

TOUNSEND. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Debtors (1880)
County Court Judgments in England and Wales

TOUNSEND. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Debtors
 (1880)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1880)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1860, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'.

TOUNSEND. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1880)
National ArchivesSoldiers of the 1st battalion, West Kent Regiment, fighting in Egypt (1882)
The war medal roll for the Egyptian campaign of 1882 is annotated to show those men actually present at Tel-el-Kebir, and thereby also entitled to the Tel-el-Kebir clasp. In addition, there follows an almost duplicate roll of men entitled to the Bronze Star granted by the Khedive of Egypt in recognition of the campaign. The 1st battalion, The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) embarked for Egypt in 1882, took part in this campaign, and again in the Nile campaign of 1884 to 1885. However, this medal roll, compiled at Polemidia Camp in Cyprus in November 1882, refers only to the 1882 campaign.

TOUNSEND. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Soldiers of the 1st battalion, West Kent Regiment, fighting in Egypt
 (1882)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.