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Schuldham Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'schuldham'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 24 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons (1176-1177)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the roll for the 23rd year of the reign of king Henry II, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1176 to Michaelmas 1177. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and fines or pardons. The large number of payments of fines for forest transgressions has been interpreted as a form of compounding for pardons by those who had rebelled during the recent years of unrest. There is a separate return in each year for each shire, the name of the shire being here printed at the top of each page. Wales was still independent, in separate kingdoms, at this period, and is not included, except for 'Herefordshire in Wales'.

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons
 (1176-1177)
Inhabitants of Norwich (1288-1391)
Among the documents preserved in the record room of the Guildhall in the city of Norwich were 13 rolls connected with the leet courts in the city during the 13th and 14th centuries while the frankpledge system on which they were based was still in full operation. William Hudson, vicar of St Peter Permountergate in the city, prepared a copy of the earliest of these, from 1288, and extracts from the leet rolls of 1289, 1290, 1291, 1293, 1296, 1300, c1307, 1313, 1375 and 1391, and from an account of amercements in 1364, a tithing roll of Mancroft leet of 1311, and inquisitions before the bailiffs in 1350, and these were published by the Selden Society in 1892, with an English translation facing the extended Latin text. In 1288 there were four leets in the city - Conesford (North Conesford, South Conesford and Berstrete subleets), Manecroft (St Stephen, St Peter de Manecroft), Wymer or Westwyk (St Giles, St Gregory, St Andrew and St George), and Over the Water (St Michael and St Clement. Each leet had separate courts and separate records within the rolls. Hudson lists the main categories of items recorded as: murder, violent death, nuisances, weights, unwholesome food, larceny, assaults, hue and cry, being out of tithing, non-attendance at leet, purprestures, forestalling, unlawful trading, craft gilds, fraudulent work, and impleading in the Court Christian.

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Inhabitants of Norwich
 (1288-1391)
The English in France (1440)
King Henry VI of England (one of the grandsons of Charles VI of France) claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. Henry VI came to the throne only seven years after his father had trounced the French at Agincourt; but his cousin, Charles VII, who became king of France in the same year, spent his long reign rebutting the English king's claim to his throne by territorial reconquest and consolidation. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. As Henry VI's reign progressed, and the English grip on northern France loosened, the French Rolls also increasingly include entries concerning the ransoming of English prisoners.

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The English in France
 (1440)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1471-1484)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of pope Sixtus IV. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Many of the names in the text were clearly a puzzle to the scribes in Rome, and spelling of British and Irish placenames and surnames is chaotic. Sixtus IV was consecrated and crowned 25 August 1471 (the day from which his pontificate is dated) and died at Rome 12 August 1484. The extracts were made by J. A. Twemlow from Vatican Regesta dxlvi to dclxxxi and Lateran Regesta dccxiii to dcccxxxviii, and published in 1955. Not all the Lateran registers survive from this pontificate, but were still in existence in the 18th century, when indexes were compiled giving rubricelle, or brief summaries of the papal bulls; nor, indeed, have all these indexes now survived, but Twemlow added an appendix listing all the rubricelle relating to the British Isles extant for the reign of Sixtus IV.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1471-1484)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1646)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1646)
Official Papers (1660-1661)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. The records of these years immediately after the restoration of the monarchy include many petitions to Charles II for offices and possessions lost during the Civil War.

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Official Papers
 (1660-1661)
Boys entering Gresham's School (1678)
The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).

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Boys entering Gresham's School
 (1678)
Boys entering Gresham's School (1707)
The Sir John Gresham Grammar School at Holt in Norfolk was founded by sir John who bought the manor house there in 1546 to convert it into a school, and building work had started by 1555. To celebrate the quatercentenary in 1955, a history of the school written by the Reverend C. L. S. Linnell was published, together with an Alumni Greshamienses, a register of boys entering the school from 1562 to 1954, compiled by A. B. Douglas. The materials to hand for the register for the early years were slight; the first coherent lists of boys survive only from 1729, and then are fitful, with little detail, and largely missing from 1784 to 1803; however, from 1810 onwards the names of boys' parents are usually recorded. The register is arranged chronologically by year (and from 1900 by term - L, Lent; M, Michaelmas; S, Summer), and then alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian name(s). Where known, year of birth is then given (in brackets), names, addresses and occupations of parents. From 1900 onwards there are italic abbreviations for sporting achievements at school (h, hockey colours; VIII, shooting colours; S, first-class swimmer; XI, cricket colours; XV, football colours), and p for house prefect and P for school prefect; then (in italics) information about the boy's adult life, and his address (where living) at the time of publication. Finally, on the right hand side of the page, in italics, is given the year of his leaving the school. Most detail is absent before 1810; and, of course, for the boys still at school in 1955, or only recently left, there are no details of future career; nor are there the usual details about their parentage. From 1898 onwards day boys are noted with an italic D (N means Newquay dayboy); and from 1900 onwards the school houses are shown (B, Bengal Lodge; F, Farfield; H, School House or Howson's; K, Kenwyn; O, Old School House; W, Woodlands); and, for the junior school, c, Crossways; k, Kenwyn; o, Old School House).

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Boys entering Gresham's School
 (1707)
Treasury Books (1712)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1712. These also include records of the appointment and replacement of customs officers such as tide waiters and surveyors.

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Treasury Books
 (1712)
Treasury Books (1714-1715)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain and the colonies, for August 1714 to December 1715. This is a digest of Treasury Minute Books T29/21-22; Disposition Books T61/22-23; King's Warrants T52/24, 26-29; Order Books T60/8-9; Plantation Auditor Out Letters T64/90; Caveat Book T64/40; Warrants Relating to Money T53/14, 16-25; Warrants Not Relating to Money T54/21-24; Lord Chamberlain's Warrants T56/18; Queen Anne's Debts T56/34; Customs Out Letters T11/16; General Out Letters T27/21-23; Ireland Out Letters T14/9-10; North Britain (Scotland) Out Letters T17/2-3; Affairs of Taxes T22/2; Reference Books T4/8-9; and Register of Papers Read at the Treasury Board T4/19: prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury.

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Treasury Books
 (1714-1715)
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