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Rothe Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'rothe'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 40 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons (1175-1176)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the roll for the 22nd year of the reign of king Henry II, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1175 to Michaelmas 1176. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and fines or pardons. The large number of payments of fines for forest transgressions has been interpreted as a form of compounding for pardons by those who had rebelled during the recent years of unrest; or, looking at it in a different way, a form of extortion from the king in order to raise money to pay off the mercenaries with whose help he had quelled the rebellions. There is a separate return in each year for each shire, the name of the shire being here printed at the top of each page. Wales was still independent, in separate kingdoms, at this period, and is not included, except for 'Herefordshire in Wales'.

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons
 (1175-1176)
Pipe Roll (1201-1202)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. Two sets of pipe rolls were prepared, not exact duplicates, the main series being the Treasurer's or Exchequer rolls, the copies (of which fewer have survived) being the Chancellor's rolls. The Chancellor's roll (or Antigraphum) for the 3rd year of king John became separated from that series at some date, and found its way to the miscellaneous records in the Chapter House at Westminster. As it happens, the Chancellor's roll for that year is in a better state of preservation than the Treasurer's roll, so it was chosen for publication by the Commissioners on the Public Records of the Kingdom, by whom it was printed in extenso in 1833.

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Pipe Roll
 (1201-1202)
Freemen and citizens of London (1314-1337)
Letter Book D, or the Liber Rubeus (Red Book) of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c. In addition, this volume includes the record of admissions to the freedom of the city by redemption (payment of a sum of money), and the binding and discharge of apprenticeships for the same period. Without freedom of the city - which could only be gained by birth (patrimony), apprenticeship or servitude, or by redemption - no man could open a shop, sell goods retail, or even reside within the city walls (except for a limited time, and then only in the houses of freemen and under frankpledge). The text was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe and printed by order of the Corporation of the City of London in 1902.

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Freemen and citizens of London
 (1314-1337)
Inhabitants of London (1314-1337)
Letter Book E of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1314-1337)
Inhabitants of Norwich (1307-1341)
This calendar of the deeds enrolled from 1307 to 1341 was compiled for the corporation by Edith Crosse (MacKinnon), indexed by Walter Rye, and published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1915. They are set out chronologically, translated from the original Latin into English, giving the name and occupation of grantor and grantee, and naming the parish in which the property lay. Precise dates are not given, just the regnal year.

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Inhabitants of Norwich
 (1307-1341)
Inhabitants of London (1337-1352)
Letter Book F of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration, minor infractions, &c. The book includes an assessment of the inhabitants in 1346 (pages 143 to 149) listing many householders; a list of mayors and sheriffs from 1189 to 1548 (276-303), and records of the city's use of infangthef (summary execution of certain criminals) down to 1409. The text was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe and printed by order of the Corporation of the City of London in 1904.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1337-1352)
Testators and legatees in London (1258-1358)
The mediaeval Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1889. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. Sometimes there were further proceedings in the court relating to the will, such as 'It was found by a jury that the testator was of full age when he made the above testament', a statement as to where the testament had been proved, or proceedings on a challenge to the testament &c. - such additional material is added in a smaller typeface in this edition.

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Testators and legatees in London
 (1258-1358)
Suffolk Charters (1410-1419)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Suffolk Charters
 (1410-1419)
Dublin diocese testators and legatees (1457-1483)
This register of testaments or wills and inventories from the diocese of Dublin in the time of archbishops Tregury and Walton (now in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin) was printed with a translation by the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland in 1896-7. The inventory usually comes first, and often includes names of debtors and creditors to the testator. The diocese of Dublin did not extend far into the Pale; but the province of Dublin, over which the archbishops had prerogative probate jurisdiction, included the southern half of Ireland, but virtually all these wills are from the city of Dublin or close at hand.

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Dublin diocese testators and legatees
 (1457-1483)
Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims (1464-1524)
Criminals could evade pursuit by claiming sanctuary in Durham Cathedral. Persons who took refuge fled to the north door of the cathedral, and knocked for admission. There were two chambers over the door in which men slept, for the purpose of admitting fugitives at any hour of the night. As soon as anyone was so admitted, the Galilee bell was immediately tolled, to give notice that someone had taken sanctuary. The offender was required to declare before witnesses the nature of his offence, and to toll a bell in token of his demanding the privilege of sanctuary. He was then provided with a gown of black cloth with a yellow cross, called St Cuthbert's Cross, upon the left shoulder. A grate was provided near the south door to sleep upon, and for 37 days sufficient provisions and bedding were provided. But within 40 days he had to appear before the coroner, clothed in sackcloth, and be branded on his right hand with the sign of the letter A. This signified that he was swearing to abjure the realm: he was then free to leave the country unhindered. The petitions for immunity were entered in the diocesan registers, usually with the marginal note 'Peticio Immunitatis': those from 18 June 1464 to 10 September 1524 (the privilege was finally abolished in 1624) were edited and printed by the Surtees Society in 1837 under the title Sanctuarium Dunelmense. Some of the criminals came from a considerable distance: the great majority were murderers or homicides. Each entry usually gives full name, original address, (often) trade, a brief description of the crime, often with date, and usually the name of the victim, as well as the witnesses to the petition. This index covers all the surnames given.

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Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims
 (1464-1524)
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