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Roker Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'roker'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 23 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Assizes on the Channel Islands (1309)
John de Fressingfeld, John de Ditton, William Russel and Drogo de Barentin, royal justices in eyre (itinerant) visited the Channel Islands in the 2nd year of the reign of king Edward II, and heard civil and criminal cases. Their assize roll was edited for the Societe Jersiaise and published in 1903, with expanded Latin text facing an English translation. There are common pleas, crown pleas, gaol delivery and quo warranto for Guernsey and Jersey (separately), as well as pleas heard on Sark, and crown pleas on Alderney.

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Assizes on the Channel Islands
 (1309)
Landowners and tenants in Nottinghamshire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

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Landowners and tenants in Nottinghamshire
 (1345-1485)
Tenants of the manor of Towcester (1609)
This rental of the manor of Towcester in Northamptonshire for 25 March 1609 was printed in 1890. The total rent roll, amounting to 92 17s 10d, includes some properties in Abthorpe, Burcote, Grimscote, Alderton, Wappenham and Caldecote.

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Tenants of the manor of Towcester
 (1609)
English passengers to New England (1632-1637)
Samuel G. Drake searched British archives from 1858 to 1860 for lists of passengers sent from England to New England, publishing the results in 1860 in Boston, Massachusetts. Adult emigrants transported to New England in the period 1632 to 1637 had to take oaths of allegiance and religious conformity, certified by parish priest, mayor or justices, and these certificates form the core of this book, but it also includes a list of 'Scotch Prisoners sent to Massachusetts in 1652, by Order of the English Government', and various other passenger lists and documents, dating as late as 1671. The early lists included the children, and normally gave the full name and age of each person. This is the index to the passengers.

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English passengers to New England
 (1632-1637)
Surrey Sessions (1659-1661)
Surrey Sessions Rolls and Order Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the Order Books from Midsummer 1659 to Midsummer 1661, inclusive, and the Sessions Rolls for Easter and Midsummer 1661.

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Surrey Sessions
 (1659-1661)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1669)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1669)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1669-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1669-1679)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1747)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1747)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices (1768)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 3 December 1768.

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Masters of Apprentices
 (1768)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices (1772)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1772

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Masters of Apprentices
 (1772)
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