Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Makgill Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'makgill'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 19 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Buy all
Get all 19 records to view, to save and print for £84.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Douglas family charters (1150-1400)
The register of the more ancient writs of the Douglases of Dalkeith, Midlothian, Earls of Morton is probably the oldest chartulary of lay possessions in Scotland, and contains about 300 charters. It was edited by C. Innes and published by the Bannatyne Club in 1853 as part II of the Registrum Honoris de Morton. The names that occur are principally those of grantors, grantees and witnesses, mostly from Midlothian.

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Douglas family charters
 (1150-1400)
Cecil Manuscripts (1540-1571)
Letters and papers of the Earl of Hertford and (1551-1571) sir William Cecil, Secretary of State. Also includes some miscellaneous material as early as 1306.

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Cecil Manuscripts
 (1540-1571)
Anglo-Scottish relations (1509-1589)
The State Papers Relating to Scotland is the collection of English government documents dealing with relations with Scotland when the latter was still an independent country.

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Anglo-Scottish relations
 (1509-1589)
Cecil Manuscripts (1590-1594)
Letters and papers of William Cecil lord Burghley, Lord Treasurer of England.

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Cecil Manuscripts
 (1590-1594)
Official Papers (1698)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Official Papers
 (1698)
State Papers Domestic (1699-1700)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State, as well as other miscellaneous records. 1 January 1699 to 31 March 1700.

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
State Papers Domestic
 (1699-1700)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Scotland (1741-1745)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces and from Scotland. The sums collected are recorded in Scottish money, with conversion to sterling for transfer to London. A Scottish pund was worth 20 English pence. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

MAKGILL. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Apprentices registered in Scotland
 (1741-1745)
Boys entering Cheltenham College (1850)
Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys entering Cheltenham College 
 (1850)
Boys entering Cheltenham College (1854)
Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys entering Cheltenham College 
 (1854)
Boys entering Cheltenham College (1855)
Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).

MAKGILL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys entering Cheltenham College 
 (1855)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.