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Mackley Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'mackley'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 112 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Cheshire gentry and their ancestors (1580-1613)
Richard St George, Norroy King of Arms, and Henry St George, Bluemaster Pursuivant of Arms, of the College of Arms, conducted a heraldic visitation of Cheshire in 1612 and 1613, recording pedigrees of gentlemen claiming the right to bear coats of arms. A copy of their visitation was elaborated by the addition of other Cheshire pedigrees in Harleian Manuscript 1535: and this manuscript was edited by sir George J. Armytage and John Paul Rylands for publication by the Harleian Society in 1909. It has a large number of pedigrees of Cheshire gentry, with a few brief abstracts from early documents; and the pedigrees of some offshoots from old Cheshire stocks which had taken root in other counties. The pedigrees largely relate to the period back from 1613 to the previous visitation of 1580, but there is also some older material, particularly back into the 15th century. In most cases each pedigree is prefixed by a heraldic description of the coat of arms. The printed volume also includes (pages 1 to 4) a list of Cheshire men who disclaimed the right to bear a coat of arms at the 1613 visitation, taken from Harleian Manuscript 1070.

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Cheshire gentry and their ancestors
 (1580-1613)
Official Papers (1627-1628)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1627-1628)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1669-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1669-1679)
Treasury Books (1689-1692)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies.

MACKLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Treasury Books
 (1689-1692)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1687-1694)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

MACKLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1687-1694)
House of Lords Proceedings (1695-1697)
Private bills dealing with divorce, disputed and entailed estates: petitions, reports and commissions: naturalisation proceedings.

MACKLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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House of Lords Proceedings
 (1695-1697)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1577-1700)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1588 to 1754 are also included here.

MACKLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1577-1700)
Innkeepers (1701)
The London Gazette of this period contained much political news, a few official notices, and a section of Advertisements. The Advertisements are diverse: some seeking to publicize a sale, an event, a publication, or a service; others appealing for help in tracing missing persons, property, or horses; bankruptcy notices &c. We have separated out all this material into different categories for indexing. Each issue of the Gazette was given a four- or five-day date such as '20-24 March'; the actual date of publication would be the last (i. e., 24 March), but modern sources often quote the first (i. e., 20 March). The dates are Old Style, so before 25 March they appear as 1700. We cover issues 3668 (2-6 January 1700/1) to 3770 (25-29 December 1701). These are items relating to innkeepers and those giving inns as their address.

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Innkeepers 
 (1701)
Treasury Books (1705-1706)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for April 1705 to September 1706. The text covers a huge variety of topics involving all manner of receipts and expenditure, customs and revenue officials, civil servants, pensioners, petitioners and postmasters figuring particularly among the individuals named.

MACKLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Treasury Books
 (1705-1706)
Treasury Books (1713)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1713. Also includes Queen Anne's Civil List (royal expenditure) Lottery papers: payment of the royal servants had fallen two years in arrear: Parliament passed an Act allowing the queen to raise half a million pounds by pledging 32 years' future income: she did this by means of a lottery.

MACKLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Treasury Books
 (1713)
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