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Jobe Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'jobe'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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London, Essex and Hertfordshire clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1361-1374)
Ordinations to first tonsure, acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop Simon de Sudbury of London. London diocese covered Middlesex, Essex and part of Hertfordshire; the ordinations also attracted many persons from distant dioceses bearing letters dimissory from their ordinaries, and these are duly noted in the text. Many of these clerks would not go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars ('religious') are listed separately, and the lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests are also separated into beneficed and not beneficed (or 'not promoted'). The acolyte lists are unusual in giving a parish or diocese of origin.

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London, Essex and Hertfordshire clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1361-1374)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1558-1570)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1558-1570)
St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1585)
Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was a maiden or a widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides
 (1585)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1649)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1906, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1649)
Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills: Devon: Testators (1658)
William Brigg compiled abstracts of all the wills in Register "Wootton" of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. The abstracts of those proved in 1658 were published by him in 1894. The court's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad. We have re-indexed the whole volume, county by county, for both testators and strays (legatees, witnesses and other persons mentioned in the abstracts).

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Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills: Devon: Testators
 (1658)
Inhabitants of New Jersey (1664-1703)
The proprietary government of New Jersey was surrendered to the Crown in 1703. The substantial early records of the colony from 1664 to 1703 were calendared by William Nelson and published by the New Jersey Historical Society in 1899 - East Jersey Libri 1, 3, 4, A, B, C, D, E, F and G; and from West Jersey the registers of New Salem Town Grants, Revel's Book of Survey, Fenwick's Surveys, Salem Surveys, Salem Deeds, Greenwich Town Lote and Gloucester Deeds. The material surveyed includes Indian deeds, patents and other conveyances, confirmatory patents, licences for purchase of lands from the Indians, town charters, court proceedings, military and civil commissions, and allowances of land for immigrant servants; but marriage certificates were omitted from this calendar, being reserved for a separate publication.

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Inhabitants of New Jersey
 (1664-1703)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
Military Medal (1918)
King George V approved the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the Field to these non-commissioned officers and men 6 August 1918.

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Military Medal
 (1918)
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