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Groves Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'groves'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 884 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular (1507)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 18 September 1507, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular
 (1507)
Official Papers (1598-1601)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1598-1601)
Worcestershire Quarter Sessions (1610)
J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.

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Worcestershire Quarter Sessions
 (1610)
Official Papers (1625-1626)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

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Official Papers
 (1625-1626)
British in the East (1625-1629)
The East India State Papers centre on the records of the East India Company, trading to India, the East Indies, Persia and China. They include the Court Minutes of the East India Company.

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British in the East
 (1625-1629)
English passengers to New England (1632-1637)
Samuel G. Drake searched British archives from 1858 to 1860 for lists of passengers sent from England to New England, publishing the results in 1860 in Boston, Massachusetts. Adult emigrants transported to New England in the period 1632 to 1637 had to take oaths of allegiance and religious conformity, certified by parish priest, mayor or justices, and these certificates form the core of this book, but it also includes a list of 'Scotch Prisoners sent to Massachusetts in 1652, by Order of the English Government', and various other passenger lists and documents, dating as late as 1671. The early lists included the children, and normally gave the full name and age of each person. This is the index to the passengers.

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English passengers to New England
 (1632-1637)
Official Papers (1651)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted by the Council of State, as well as other miscellaneous records. These records are from January to October 1651.

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Official Papers
 (1651)
Early settlers of Connecticut (1636-1665)
The colony of Connecticut was settled in 1633 by emigrants from Massachusetts. The modern state of Connecticut also includes the colony of Newhaven. The seat of government of Connecticut was established in 1635 at Newtown (Hartford), on the site of a Dutch fort. The first volume of the Connecticut colony records is in three parts: 1, the records of the General and Particular Courts from April 1636 to December 1649; 2, Copy wills and probate inventories; 3, Grants and Conveyances of Lands, mostly from 1662 to 1690. The second volume of the records contains the minutes of the General Court from February 1650 to October 1669. In accordance with a resolution of the General Assembly, J. Hammond Trumbull transcribed the whole of the surviving court records as far as May 1665 (the union with Newhaven colony), with the probate material from 1640 to 1649, and these were published as 'The Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut' in 1850.

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Early settlers of Connecticut
 (1636-1665)
Inhabitants of Manchester, and travellers (1633-1666)
The constables' accounts of the manor of Manchester in Lancashire from 1633 to 1647 were edited by J. P. Earwaker and published in 1892. The accounts largely consist of details of disbursements by the constables, and as such include payments to paupers and soldiers with passes to help them on their journeys to and from other parts of the country. Earwaker added nine 'important appendices' to the work: 1. Disbursements and Receipts during the Plague of Manchester, 1605-6 and 1606 (from State Papers Domestic in the Public Record Office); 2. List of the Books of Assessment, Charity Money Accounts, &c., now in the Possession of the Corporation; 3. List of the Inhabitants of Manchester in 1648 (pages 181 to 201); 4. List of the Inhabitants of Manchester in 1651 (202-221); 5. Disbursements of the Constables in 1651-2; 6. List of the Inhabitants of Manchester assessed in 1659 (225-246); 7. A Second List of the Inhabitants of Manchester in 1659 (247-260); 8. List of the Inhabitants of Manchester assessed in 1666 (261-283); and 9. List of Uncommon, Obsolete, and Dialect Words to be found in the Preceding Pages.

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Inhabitants of Manchester, and travellers
 (1633-1666)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1669)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1669)
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