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Grise Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'grise'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 15 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
Officers and tenants of the Scottish crown (1488-1496)
In 1887 the 10th volume of Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum, or The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, was published in Edinburgh as part of the Scottish Series of Chronicles and Memorials. The main text is a transcript in extended Latin, but with some passages reduced to an abstract in English (in italics), of the rolls of the Scottish royal exchequer from 19 June 1488 to 12 October 1496 (rolls cclxxviii to ccxcv, old numbers ccxciii to cccix). This more or less continuous series alternates between accounts of the Ballivi ad Extra (royal chamberlains, lessees of lordships, rangers of wards, receivers &c) and those of the Custumars (receivers of customary payments and similar revenues) and bailies (bailiffs) of burghs (boroughs). In all, they give a summary description of all these sources of royal revenue - and not only mention the payers and receivers in general, but also refer to many occasional payments to and receipts from individuals hardly otherwise found in the surviving records. An appendix (pages 629 to 763) of rentals of royal property throughout Scotland in the same period gives a rich harvest of personal names; and another (764-772), an Index in Libros Responsionum, lists persons to whom sasine (seisin) was granted in 1492 to 1496.

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Officers and tenants of the Scottish crown
Somerset testators and legatees (1501-1530)
Somerset was almost coextensive with the diocese of Bath and Wells, which exercised local probate jurisdiction through its consistory and archdeaconry courts: but superior to the diocese was the province of Canterbury. Somerset testators who also had property outside the county had their wills proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury (PCC). The Somerset Record Society embarked on a program of publishing genealogical abstracts of the registered copy wills of Somerset testators in the PCC archives, and in 1903 (volume xvi) printed abstracts edited by the Reverend F. W. Weaver from the PCC registers 1501-1503 (register Blamyr), 1504-1506 (Holgrave), 1506-1508 (Adeane), 1508-1511 (Bennett), 1511-1514 (Fetiplace), 1514-1517 (Holder), 1517-1520 (Ayloffe), 1520-1522 (Maynwaryng), 1523-1525 (Bodfelde), 1525-1528 (Porch) and 1529-1530 (Jankyn). In addition, the volume includes abstracts of 48 Somerset copy wills in the registers of the Archbishops of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace Library from 1363 to 1491. The heading of each abstract gives the year of making the will (not the year of probate) and the testator's name in bold. Below that is the quire number and name of the PCC register. Date and details of probate are given at the foot of each abstract. Spellings of surnames are preserved as they appear in the registered copy wills, and may vary within a single document.

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Somerset testators and legatees
Anglo-Scottish relations (1509-1589)
The State Papers Relating to Scotland is the collection of English government documents dealing with relations with Scotland when the latter was still an independent country.

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Anglo-Scottish relations
Ambassadors, ministers, soldiers and spies (1589)
The State Papers Foreign of queen Elizabeth consist mainly of letters and reports concerning England's relations with continental Europe, particularly the Netherlands and France. January to July 1589.

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Ambassadors, ministers, soldiers and spies
Secretary of State's Papers (1602)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1627)
The Privy Council of Charles I was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
Inhabitants of New Jersey (1664-1703)
The proprietary government of New Jersey was surrendered to the Crown in 1703. The substantial early records of the colony from 1664 to 1703 were calendared by William Nelson and published by the New Jersey Historical Society in 1899 - East Jersey Libri 1, 3, 4, A, B, C, D, E, F and G; and from West Jersey the registers of New Salem Town Grants, Revel's Book of Survey, Fenwick's Surveys, Salem Surveys, Salem Deeds, Greenwich Town Lote and Gloucester Deeds. The material surveyed includes Indian deeds, patents and other conveyances, confirmatory patents, licences for purchase of lands from the Indians, town charters, court proceedings, military and civil commissions, and allowances of land for immigrant servants; but marriage certificates were omitted from this calendar, being reserved for a separate publication.

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Inhabitants of New Jersey
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Norwich in Norfolk (1719-1721)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1718. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered at Norwich in Norfolk
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