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Gravet Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'gravet'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 6 records (displaying 1 to 6): 

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Official Papers (1645-1647)
The State Papers Domestic are the main series of records of internal British administration for this period. The volumes printed in abstract here (Charles I dx to dxv) run from July 1645 to December 1647, a period of defeat of royal power by the parliamentary forces. Parliament's victory at Naseby in June 1645 led to the collapse of the Royalist cause and the imprisonment of the king in Carisbrooke Castle towards the close of 1647. During all these events the administration of government continued, largely using the same institutions, leaving similar series of records as before: but executive power is now represented in these books by the Committee of Both Kingdoms (England and Scotland). The State Papers Domestic for these years are largely concerned with the prosecution of hostilities, the movements and supply of troops, and the treatment of 'delinquents'. Chronologically interleaved with the abstracts of the main volumes are details from the series of Proceedings of the Committee of Both Kingdoms, but these are lost for the years 1646 to 1647, brief notes only surviving in the Indexes to the Day Book of Orders. There are also appendices relating to the victualling and disposition of the Navy, taken from the Letters and Papers of the Committee for the Admiralty and the Committe of the Navy, which also include some petitions from sailors, victuallers, officials, or their dependants, seeking redress or relief.

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Official Papers
 (1645-1647)
Surrey Sessions (1661-1663)
Surrey Sessions Rolls and Order Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the Order Books from October 1661 to January 1663, inclusive, and the Sessions Rolls for October 1661, January 1662, April 1662, July 1662, October 1662 and January 1663.

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Surrey Sessions
 (1661-1663)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1714)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 12 April to 31 December 1714.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1714)
Masters of Merchantmen (1785)
The Daily Universal Register of April 1785 includes a section entitled Ship News. This is compiled from reports from Portsmouth, Deal, Plymouth, Whitby, Cowes, Falmouth, Bristol and Gravesend as to merchant shipping movements; news of losses and sightings coming in from various ports; a list of Ships Arrived in the (London) River, in the Clyde, in the Creek(e), in the Downs, off the Lizard, off Scilly, off the Start, in Studland Bay, off Whitby, off the Wight, at Aberdeen, Alicante, Ancona, Antigua, Baltimore, Barbadoes, Barcelona, Bayonne, Belfast, Bombay, Bonny, Bordeaux, Brighthelmstone (Brighton), Bristol, Cadiz, Carlingford, Cartagena, Charlestown, Cork, Cowes, Cuxhaven, Dartmouth, Dominica, Dover, Dublin, Dunkirk, Falmouth, Galway, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guernsey, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Hamburg, Havre de Grace, Hull, Jersey, Kinsale, Lancaster, Leghorn, Limerick, Lisbon, Liverpool, Londonderry, Lochryan, Malaga, Marseilles, Montserrat, Nantes, New Providence (Bahamas), New York, Newry, Oporto, Ostend, Penzance, Plymouth, Poole, Portsmouth, Rotterdam, St Eustatia, St John's, St Kitts, St Vincents, Scarborough, Scilly, Seville, Southampton, Stangate Creek, Tenerife, Texel, Tobago, Venice, Waterford, Weymouth, Whitehaven, and in 'Africa', Georgia, Jamaica, Maryland, North Carolina, Philadelphia, South Carolina and Virginia; and Coast Lists made at the Custom House in London. Except in the home ports, the register refers only to British shipping: each ship is usually identified merely by its name, and the master's surname, although masters' christian names are given occasionally. Naval vessels are mentioned rarely, and their captains' names not usually stated.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1785)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
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