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Grames Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'grames'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Close Rolls (1343-1346)
The close rolls of the 17th, 18th and 19th years of the reign of king Edward III record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1343-1346)
Secretary of State's Papers (1601)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1601)
Treasury Books (1713)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for 1713. Also includes Queen Anne's Civil List (royal expenditure) Lottery papers: payment of the royal servants had fallen two years in arrear: Parliament passed an Act allowing the queen to raise half a million pounds by pledging 32 years' future income: she did this by means of a lottery.

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Treasury Books
 (1713)
Treasury Books (1714-1715)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain and the colonies, for August 1714 to December 1715. This is a digest of Treasury Minute Books T29/21-22; Disposition Books T61/22-23; King's Warrants T52/24, 26-29; Order Books T60/8-9; Plantation Auditor Out Letters T64/90; Caveat Book T64/40; Warrants Relating to Money T53/14, 16-25; Warrants Not Relating to Money T54/21-24; Lord Chamberlain's Warrants T56/18; Queen Anne's Debts T56/34; Customs Out Letters T11/16; General Out Letters T27/21-23; Ireland Out Letters T14/9-10; North Britain (Scotland) Out Letters T17/2-3; Affairs of Taxes T22/2; Reference Books T4/8-9; and Register of Papers Read at the Treasury Board T4/19: prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury.

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Treasury Books
 (1714-1715)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Sussex (1792)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/66

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Apprentices registered in Sussex
 (1792)
Workers at Pollard's Cotton Mill, Manchester (1818)
The minutes of evidence taken before the Lords Committee on the Cotton Factories Bill include a series of reports by medical men as to the general health of the mill workers in April 1818. For each factory there is a complete list of workers, giving full name, age, how long employed in a factory, health (in general terms, such as 'Good' or 'Sickly'), and any chronic disease or 'distortion', cause and duration - with slight variations from report to report. The physicians examined several hundred people each day, asking such questions as 'Have you any swellings or sores anywhere?', 'Are your limbs straight?', 'Have you a good appetite for food?', 'Do you conceive yourself to be in good health?', and all concluded that the health of the mill workers was good, and that the workers were cheerful. This is the report for Pollard's spinning mill in Manchester, 20 April 1818.

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Workers at Pollard's Cotton Mill, Manchester
 (1818)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesBritish infantry fighting in China (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors who took part in the prosecution of the war against the Chinese from 1856 to 1860. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured; for being actually engaged in the operations which ceased with the first capture of the Taku Forts, 20 May 1858, and led to the Treaty of Tientsin; for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860. The 1st battalion, the 3rd (East Kent) Regiment of Foot (the Buffs), based in Limerick, embarked for Malta 2 April 1851. The battalion took part on in the capture of the Taku Forts.

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British infantry fighting in China
 (1860)
Infants in Strabane Workhouse, County Tyrone (1874)
Return, “with Christian and Surname of each, of Infants Born in Irish Workhouses, or Admitted thereto when Healthy under Twelve Months Old, and attempted to be Reared therein during the Years 1872 to 1874, showing what has since become of them”. The returns from each poor law union workhouse give: Christian and Surname of Infant Born in the Workhouse, or Admitted Healthy, under Twelve Months; Year; and whether discharged, healthy, in hospital, or dead.

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Infants in Strabane Workhouse, County Tyrone
 (1874)
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