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Graffham Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'graffham'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Leicester (1327-1509)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1901) of extracts from the borough archives of 1327 to 1509, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: a coroner's roll of 1327; the merchant gild rolls; tax returns; court rolls; rentals; mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for tallages of 1336 (pp. 34-40); 1347-8 (69-71); and 1354 (93-99); subsidy rolls of 1492 (331-334) and 1497 (351-353); and a benevolence roll of 1505 (370-374). There is a calendar of conveyances (388-446), and a list of mayors, bailiffs, and other officials (447-462); and, finally, entrants into the merchant gild from 1465 to 1510. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). Those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but thitherto the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there.

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Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1327-1509)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1669)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1669)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1720)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 5 September to 31 December 1720.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1720)
Pupil Teachers in Berkshire: Boys (1851)
The Committee of Council on Education awarded annual grants for the training and support of pupil teachers and stipendiary monitors in schools in England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. Pupil teachers started training between the ages of 13 and 15, and 'must not be subject to any bodily infirmity likely to impair their usefulness as Pupil Teachers, such as scrofula, fits, asthma, deafness, great imperfections in the sight or voice, the loss of an eye from constitutional disease, or the loss of an arm or leg, or the permanent disability of either arm or leg, curvature of the spine, or a hereditary tendency to insanity'. They also had to obtain certificates from the managers of the school (and their clergyman, in the case of Church of England schools) as to their moral character and that of their family; good conduct; punctuality, diligence, obedience, and attention to duty; and attentiveness to their religious duties. This detailed statement in the annual report of the committee for the year ending 31 October 1851 lists schools by county, giving: 1. Name and Denomination of School, with these abbreviations - B, British and Foreign School Society; F. C., Free Church of Scotland; H. C., Home and Colonial School Society; N., National Society, or connected with the Church of England; R. C., Roman Catholic Poor-School Committee; Wesn., Wesleyan Methodist. 2. Annual grants conditionally awarded by the committee in augmentation of teachers' salaries, and in stipends to apprentices, and gratuities to teachers. 3. Month in which annual examination was to be held. 4. Names of apprentices, giving surname and initials, and year of apprenticeship. Stipendiary monitors are indicated by (S. M.).

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Pupil Teachers in Berkshire: Boys
 (1851)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Algiers in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). Her Majesty's Ship Algiers, a 90-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Algiers in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Esk (1856-1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged from 1856 to 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Canton clasp, for being actually present at Canton on 28 and 29 December 1857, when that city was bombarded and finally captured.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Esk
 (1856-1860)
Meritorious Service Medal (1918)
King George V on 17 June 1918 approved of the award of the Meritorious Service Medal to these Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men, in recognition of valuable services rendered with the Forces in France during the Great War.

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Meritorious Service Medal 
 (1918)
Inhabitants of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham and Mottingham (1937)
Kelly's Directory of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham &c. includes this directory of private residents, listed alphabetically by surname and christian name, with address, covering an area extending from the river Thames on the north to Mottingham and Grove Park on the south, and from Eltham on the east to Deptford Creek and Hither Green on the west. These abbreviations are used in the addresses: B, Blackheath; D, Deptford; E G, East Greenwich; G, Greenwich; L, Lee; and Lew, Lewisham.

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Inhabitants of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham and Mottingham
 (1937)
Imperial Service Medal (1948)
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James's Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

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Imperial Service Medal
 (1948)
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