Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Googe Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'googe'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 21 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Open Access
Buying all 21 results of this search individually would cost £110.00. But you can have free access to all 21 records for a year, to view, to save and print, for £100. Save £10.00. More...

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

GOOGE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
Official Papers (1547-1580)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to England, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records.

GOOGE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Official Papers
 (1547-1580)
Masters of ships carrying English emigrants to New England (1632-1637)
Samuel G. Drake searched British archives from 1858 to 1860 for lists of passengers sent from England to New England, publishing the results in 1860 in Boston, Massachusetts. Adult emigrants transported to New England in the period 1632 to 1637 had to take oaths of allegiance and religious conformity, certified by parish priest, mayor or justices, and these certificates form the core of this book, but it also includes a list of 'Scotch Prisoners sent to Massachusetts in 1652, by Order of the English Government', and various other passenger lists and documents, dating as late as 1671. The early lists included the children, and normally gave the full name and age of each person. This is the index to the masters of the ships.

GOOGE. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters of ships carrying English emigrants to New England
 (1632-1637)
Lawyers and officers of Lincoln's Inn (1586-1660)
Lincoln's Inn is one of the ancient inns of court in London exclusively invested with the right to call lawyers to the English bar. The Black Books of Lincoln's Inn are the main administrative records of the society, containing the names of those filling the different offices year by year; the annual accounts of the Pensioner and the Treasurer; regulations; punishments and fines for misdemeanours. This edition, printed for the inn in 1898, covers the volumes from the 20th year of the reign of queen Elizabeth to the end of the Protectorate, supplemented by material entries from another series, called the Red Books, surviving from 1614, which deal with orders concerning and admittances to the chambers of the inn.

GOOGE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Lawyers and officers of Lincoln's Inn
 (1586-1660)
Suffolk householders (1674)
Hearth tax was raised by assessing each householder on the number of chimneys to the dwelling. This provided a simple way to make a rough judgment as to the value of the dwelling: paupers were issued exemption certificates, but they too were listed at the end of each return. The returns were made by township, grouped by hundred. A complete copy of the hearth tax return for each shire was sent to the Exchequer: this is the return for Suffolk for Lady Day (25 March) 1674 (E 179/257/14) as printed in 1905 as Suffolk Green Book no xi, vol. 13. The numbers given are the numbers of hearths: where two or more people are grouped together with one number, it may be assumed that they were heads of separate households sharing a single building with that number of chimneys.

GOOGE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Suffolk householders
 (1674)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage. This index also includes marriage licence allegations for the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, 1558 to 1699.

GOOGE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1679)
Official Papers (1683-1684)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. This covers October 1683 to April 1684.

GOOGE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Official Papers
 (1683-1684)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

GOOGE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
Wandsworth Burials (1738)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. These include a French Protestant congregation that worshipped in a church (the registers of which do not survive) in a courtyard immediately opposite the parish church. The Quakers had a cemetery of their own. The 18th-century burial registers also include a surprising number of children sent out to Wandsworth from London to nurse.

GOOGE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Wandsworth Burials
 (1738)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Cambridge (1755)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Liverpool return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/52

GOOGE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Apprentices registered in Cambridge
 (1755)
1 | 2 | 3Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.