Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Glenfield Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'glenfield'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Buy all
Get all 11 records to view, to save and print for £56.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Inhabitants of Leicester (1103-1327)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1899) of extracts from the earliest borough archives, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: the borough charters; the merchant gild rolls (from 1196 onwards); tax returns; court rolls (from about 1260 onwards); mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). The sample scan shows part of a gild entrance roll; those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but at this period the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for a loan for redemption of pontage and gavelpence of 1252-3 (pp. 44-46); five tallages of 1269 to 1271 brought together in a single table (128-145); and tallages of 1286 (208-211), 1307 (255-257), 1311 (272-274) and 1318 (310-313). The portmanmoot (or portmote) was the borough court dealing with minor infractions and civil suits. Finally, there is a calendar of charters (from c.1232 onwards, 381-400), and a list of mayors, bailiffs (reeves), receivers and serjeants (401-407).

GLENFIELD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1103-1327)
Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury (1214-1439)
Christopher Wordsworth, Master of the Hospital of St Nicholas in Salisbury, Wiltshire, published an edition of the 15th-century cartulary of that foundation in 1902. While transcribing the text, he interspersed it with notes and lists from his own researches so as to provide a general history of the hospital, and some of the material dates from much later than 1500, and relates to those institutions which he regarded as daughter institutions or offshoots of the hospital. There are later additions to the cartulary through to 1639, and records of the Chapel of St John Baptist on the Isle, the Scotist College of St Nicholas de Vaux (Valle Scholarium), and the collegiate church of St Edmund, Salisbury. There is also a calendar of records belonging to the hospital. The cartulary itself is a quarto codex of 80 leaves, copying charters of bequests to the hospital, and in these the main persons to appear are the benefactors, the witnesses, and occasionally the names of tenants, occupiers of adjoining tenements, and members of the hospital clergy. The cartulary is in six geographical sections: I, Box, Wyvelesford and Manningford Bohun; II, Broad Hinton; III, Fyssherton (Fisherton Aucher or Anger); IV, East and West Harnham; V, Salisbury; and VI, Gerardeston (Gurston in Broadchalke).

GLENFIELD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury
 (1214-1439)
Inhabitants of Leicester (1327-1509)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1901) of extracts from the borough archives of 1327 to 1509, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: a coroner's roll of 1327; the merchant gild rolls; tax returns; court rolls; rentals; mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for tallages of 1336 (pp. 34-40); 1347-8 (69-71); and 1354 (93-99); subsidy rolls of 1492 (331-334) and 1497 (351-353); and a benevolence roll of 1505 (370-374). There is a calendar of conveyances (388-446), and a list of mayors, bailiffs, and other officials (447-462); and, finally, entrants into the merchant gild from 1465 to 1510. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). Those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but thitherto the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there.

GLENFIELD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1327-1509)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1569-1578)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1569 to June 1578, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by John Hill Burton, Historiographer Royal for Scotland, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1878. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel.

GLENFIELD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1569-1578)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

GLENFIELD. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Belfast Ship Owners (1863)
Straker's Annual Mercantile, Ship and Insurance Register includes lists of ship owners in Belfast, Cardiff, Colchester, Dover, Dublin, Falmouth, Folkestone, Grimsby, Hartlepool, Harwich, Hull, Leith, London, Lynn, Newcastle, Penzance, Plymouth, Ramsgate & Margate, South Shields, Sunderland, Swansea, Wisbech and Yarmouth. In each case the list gives surname, christian name or initials, and (usually) address.

GLENFIELD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Belfast Ship Owners
 (1863)
The London & County Banking Company Shareholders (1873)
Copy of the return by the London and County Banking Company to the Inland Revenue listing the 'persons of whom the Company or partnership consists', pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation.

GLENFIELD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
The London & County Banking Company  Shareholders
 (1873)
National ArchivesMen of the 13th Regiment of Foot (1st Somersetshire - Prince Albert's Light Infantry) fighting in South Africa (1877-1879)
What is commonly called the Zulu War Medal was awarded to those British soldiers who fought in a series of conflicts in southern Africa from 1877 (the Kaffir War) through to 1879 (the Zulu War). In 1880 the various units submitted returns of the officers, non-commissioned officers and men 'entitled to the Medal for Military Operations in South Africa during 1877-8-9' and these 'medal rolls' are now in the National Archives. The returns are made with the information arranged in twelve columns: 1. Rank and name 2. Regimental number and rank at the time the medal was earned 3. Whether in possession of medal for previous wars 4. Whether engaged against the Gaikas, Galekas and other Kaffir tribes 1877-8 5. Whether engaged against Pokwane 1878 6. Whether engaged against the Griquas 1878 7. Whether engaged against the Zulus 1879 8. Whether engaged against Sekukuni as set forth in Par. 2. G. O. 9. Whether engaged against Moirosi's stronghold 10. Entitled to medal without clasp under Par. 4. 11. Serving with regiment, depot, dead, discharged, deserted, &c. 12. Notes and cross-references to the Adjutant-General's medal lists. WO 100/46.

GLENFIELD. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Men of the 13th Regiment of Foot (1st Somersetshire  -  Prince Albert's Light Infantry) fighting in South Africa
 (1877-1879)
National ArchivesShropshire Light Infantry fighting in Egypt (1882)
The war medal roll for the Egyptian campaign of 1882 is annotated to show those men actually present at Tel-el-Kebir, and thereby also entitled to the Tel-el-Kebir clasp. In addition, there follows an almost duplicate roll of men entitled to the Bronze Star granted by the Khedive of Egypt in recognition of the campaign. The 1st battalion, The King's (Shropshire Light Infantry), left England for Egypt in 1882, and took part in this campaign before being sent on to Malta in 1883. The battalion returned for further duty in Egypt in 1885, but this roll, which compiled at Camp Abbasiyeh near Cairo in November 1882, refers only to the 1882 campaign.

GLENFIELD. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Shropshire Light Infantry fighting in Egypt
 (1882)
Boys entering Cheltenham College (1884)
Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known). Of course, in the case of these boys entering the school in the last few years before 1890 their career lay in the future, and the information gives relates only to their parentage and their time at school.

GLENFIELD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Boys entering Cheltenham College 
 (1884)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.