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Ginner Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'ginner'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Well-Affected Men of Kent (1648)
After the capture of king Charles I by the forces of Parliament, this petition signed by over 1100 of 'the well affected in the county of Kent' was drawn up, calling on the Commons to prosecute his trial vigorously, and not to be satisfied with 'less than the blood of those persons, who have been the principall Authors' of the civil war; and also to transfer authority over all the militia in the country to 'his Excellency the Lord Fairfax'. Thomas Hearne the antiquary published a copy of the petition 'taken by no very skillfull scribe' in 1774, observing that such petitions were 'very diligently drawn up, not by the honest part, but by the very scum, of the Nation, signed generally by persons, in all respects, of an ordinary Reputation.' In this particular case, he noted, 'you'll scarce find one among them of any note or distinction.'

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Well-Affected Men of Kent
 (1648)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors (1835)
Principal creditors petitioning to force a bankruptcy (but often close relatives of the bankrupt helping to protect his assets): and solicitors

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Petitioning Creditors and Solicitors
 (1835)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Bankrupts' Assignees (1839)
Assignees of bankrupts' estates (usually principal creditors and/or close relatives of the bankrupt) in England and Wales

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Bankrupts' Assignees
 (1839)
Bankrupts' Assignees (1842)
Assignees of bankrupts' estates (usually principal creditors and/or close relatives of the bankrupt) in England and Wales

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Bankrupts' Assignees
 (1842)
Gentry in London (1856)
The Post Office London Directory for 1856 includes this 'Court Directory', listing alphabetically by surname and christian name the upper class residents of the capital with their postal addresses. 'In order to afford space for the addresses, the abbreviation "esq." for esquire has no longer been appended to each name in the Court Directory. It should be understood that such should be added to the name of every gentleman in the following pages to which no inconsistent addition is affixed.' Decorations, honours &c. are generally given. Some gentlemen appear who are also listed (as professional men, &c.) in the commercial section. Those with second residences in the provinces usually have the country address given as well.

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Gentry in London
 (1856)
Members of the Sussex Archaeological Society (1858)
"We may fairly ascribe the origin of the Society to the discovery, in the autumn of 1845, of the remains of Gundrada and De Warenne at Lewes Priory. That remarkable exhumation of the illustrious and long-buried dead, excited a deep and long-sustained interest, not only in the history of those noble personages, but also in the annals of the monastery they had founded, and in many cognate but hitherto much-neglected matters of research." By 1858 the membership had risen to about 550, and the tenth volume of Sussex Archaeological Collections had been published. The membership list gives christian name or initials and surname, and address. An asterisk prefixed to a name denotes a Life Compounder.

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Members of the Sussex Archaeological Society
 (1858)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Hastings (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).

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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Hastings
 (1861)
Partnerships Dissolved (1880)
Dissolution of trading partnerships, or removal of a partner from a business, in England and Wales, July to September 1880

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Partnerships Dissolved
 (1880)
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