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Gilbank Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'gilbank'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 34 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Tradesmen of York (1272-1558)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city.Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 19,900 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year, the year being here reckoned as starting at Michaelmas (29 September) until 1373, and thence at Candlemas (2 February). Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; and those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

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Tradesmen of York
 (1272-1558)
Tradesmen of York (1559-1759)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city. Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 16,600 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year. Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen (per patres); and a handful who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

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Tradesmen of York
 (1559-1759)
Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1763)
Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)

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Mathematics students at Cambridge University
 (1763)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in York (1769)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Durham return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/57

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Apprentices registered in York
 (1769)
Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1772)
Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Recipients of the Chancellor's Medals are annotated with (A) for the senior medal, (B) for the junior; and winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)

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Mathematics students at Cambridge University
 (1772)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1776)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1776)
English Churchmen (1791)
Archbishops, bishops, deans, chancellor, archdeacons, and prebendaries of royal prebends, in England and Wales; and officers of Sion College in London, and the fellows of the college, being the rectors and vicars within the city of London.

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English Churchmen
 (1791)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1794)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

GILBANK. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1794)
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