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Fyler Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fyler'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 70 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Close Rolls (1441-1447)
The close rolls of the 20th to 25th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1441-1447)
Close Rolls (1447-1454)
The close rolls of the 26th to 32nd years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1447-1454)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Early settlers of Connecticut (1636-1665)
The colony of Connecticut was settled in 1633 by emigrants from Massachusetts. The modern state of Connecticut also includes the colony of Newhaven. The seat of government of Connecticut was established in 1635 at Newtown (Hartford), on the site of a Dutch fort. The first volume of the Connecticut colony records is in three parts: 1, the records of the General and Particular Courts from April 1636 to December 1649; 2, Copy wills and probate inventories; 3, Grants and Conveyances of Lands, mostly from 1662 to 1690. The second volume of the records contains the minutes of the General Court from February 1650 to October 1669. In accordance with a resolution of the General Assembly, J. Hammond Trumbull transcribed the whole of the surviving court records as far as May 1665 (the union with Newhaven colony), with the probate material from 1640 to 1649, and these were published as 'The Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut' in 1850.

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Early settlers of Connecticut
 (1636-1665)
Dorset Charters (1680-1689)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Dorset Charters
 (1680-1689)
Official Papers (1697)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad.

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Official Papers
 (1697)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Treasury Books (1714-1715)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain and the colonies, for August 1714 to December 1715. This is a digest of Treasury Minute Books T29/21-22; Disposition Books T61/22-23; King's Warrants T52/24, 26-29; Order Books T60/8-9; Plantation Auditor Out Letters T64/90; Caveat Book T64/40; Warrants Relating to Money T53/14, 16-25; Warrants Not Relating to Money T54/21-24; Lord Chamberlain's Warrants T56/18; Queen Anne's Debts T56/34; Customs Out Letters T11/16; General Out Letters T27/21-23; Ireland Out Letters T14/9-10; North Britain (Scotland) Out Letters T17/2-3; Affairs of Taxes T22/2; Reference Books T4/8-9; and Register of Papers Read at the Treasury Board T4/19: prepared by William A. Shaw for the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury.

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Treasury Books
 (1714-1715)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1726)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 January to 31 December 1726

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1726)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1743)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 13 June to 31 December 1743

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1743)
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