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Furnell Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'furnell'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 139 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral (1160-1169)
The Liber A or Pilosus of St Paul's cathedral, London, was initiated in 1241 as an attempt at copying all the charters, chirographs and other diverse writings found in the treasury of the church; after that original project was abandoned, the codex came to be used as a general register or cartulary. The first portion was edited for the Royal Historical Society by Marion Gibbs and printed in 1939. Where the original charters also survived, or a better text was found in Liber L, she used these superior sources. Liber A never became a complete register of the cathedral's charters; nor are the charters it contains necessarily the most important, nor were they grouped chronologically or geographically. The text remains as a record of part of the great landed wealth of the church in London and nearby. The persons that appear are the grantors, justices, those named in the descriptions of property, and the witnesses.

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Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral
 (1160-1169)
Pipe Rolls: the Land of Ralph de Caugi (1189-1190)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe contain returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English sheriffdoms, counties or shires and from honors and bishoprics in the hands of the crown. This is the roll for the 1st year of the reign of king Richard I, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1189 to Michaelmas 1190. Many of the individual surnames that appear are in the accounts of fines &c. levied by justices.

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Pipe Rolls: the Land of Ralph de Caugi
 (1189-1190)
Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral (1230-1239)
The Liber A or Pilosus of St Paul's cathedral, London, was initiated in 1241 as an attempt at copying all the charters, chirographs and other diverse writings found in the treasury of the church; after that original project was abandoned, the codex came to be used as a general register or cartulary. The first portion was edited for the Royal Historical Society by Marion Gibbs and printed in 1939. Where the original charters also survived, or a better text was found in Liber L, she used these superior sources. Liber A never became a complete register of the cathedral's charters; nor are the charters it contains necessarily the most important, nor were they grouped chronologically or geographically. The text remains as a record of part of the great landed wealth of the church in London and nearby. The persons that appear are the grantors, justices, those named in the descriptions of property, and the witnesses.

FURNELL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral
 (1230-1239)
Testators and legatees in London (1258-1358)
The mediaeval Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1889. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. Sometimes there were further proceedings in the court relating to the will, such as 'It was found by a jury that the testator was of full age when he made the above testament', a statement as to where the testament had been proved, or proceedings on a challenge to the testament &c. - such additional material is added in a smaller typeface in this edition.

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Testators and legatees in London
 (1258-1358)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1632)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1902, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1632)
Massachusetts Bay freemen (1642-1649)
The Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England was established by royal charter in 1629, the area being settled from 1630 onwards; the charter was withdrawn in 1684. The colony at this period did not include Plymouth or Maine. This court book, compiled by the Increase Nowell, company secretary, also includes memoranda concerning land grants and disputes, official appointments, &c. It was edited by Nathaniel B. Shurtleff, and printed by order of the legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1853. Months are given in the dating in Puritan fashion, i. e. March is 1mo, April 2mo, &c. The lists of names of those taking oaths as freemen of the colony were printed separately, and are listed here.

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Massachusetts Bay freemen
 (1642-1649)
PCC Probate Abstracts (1650-1651)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator

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PCC Probate Abstracts
 (1650-1651)
Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors (1673-1692)
The only surviving complete volume of the records of the courts held by the Governor and Assistants of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay is for the period 1673 to 1692. It was transcribed by John Noble, and published by order of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Boston, New England, as County Commissioners of the County of Suffolk, Massachusetts. Under English law overseas colonies were generally deemed to fall under the jurisdiction of the Admiralty, and were subject to English law varied by local circumstances. These Courts of Assistants therefore also function as Courts of Admiralty; the courts had jurisiction over criminal cases and also in civil disputes between parties. In practice, many of the names that occur in the record are just those of the members of the grand jury and the lesser juries (appointed from among the adult male householders of the colony) before whom the cases were tried.

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Massachusetts Criminals, Litigants, Lawyers and Jurors
 (1673-1692)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1713)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1713.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1713)
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