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Forges Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'forges'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Liberate Rolls (1251-1260)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 36th to 44th years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1251-1260)
Liberate Rolls (1260-1267)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 45th to 51st years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1260-1267)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
National ArchivesResidents of Montpelier Row, Knightsbridge (1851)
In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 28 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and All Saints Knightsbridge ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480.

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Residents of Montpelier Row, Knightsbridge
 (1851)
Medical Men (1853)
The British Medical Directory for England, Scotland, and Wales of 1853 lists doctors, physicians, surgeons and other medical men. Each entry gives full name, surname first; address; qualifications; public appointments; and (where appropriate) a list of books and of works published in medical journals.

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Medical Men
 (1853)
Schoolmasters and trainees with Certificates of Merit (1856)
The Committee of Council on Education for England and Wales produced an annual report which included several lists of teachers and trainee teachers, including an Annual Calendar of Teachers who have Obtained Certificates of Merit (completed to 1 January 1856), from which this sample scan is taken. The teachers are listed alphabetically by surname and initial, with name of school, post town or county, and grade, as either certificate or class. Student teachers were classed at the end of each year of training, so the column for class shows a student's class (1, 2 or 3) at the end of their first or second year of training. The teacher may then be awarded a certificate of merit by Her Majesty's Inspector, in which case the class and division of the certificate awarded appears in the columns for Certificate. No certificate of merit was granted a student, as a teacher, until he or she had been for two years in charge of the same elementary school, and the certificate was granted on the basis of two reports of performance as a teacher in school. If the first report was favourable, the teacher was paid for the first year on the scale of the lowest class; if the second report was favourable, augmentation and class of certificate was fixed for the next five years, after which (and so on from time to time) the certificates were open to revision. The value of the certificate, in the first instance, was not fixed higher than the first division of the third class, for any student who had resided less than two years at a training school under inspection. This is the index to the schoolmasters and male students in training schools.

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Schoolmasters and trainees with Certificates of Merit
 (1856)
Boys entering Epsom College (1855-1859)
The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1920 onwards the pupils' addresses as of 1955 (where living and still known) are added at the end of each entry. This is the index to the years 1855 to 1859, when the Reverend Robinson Thornton was headmaster.

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Boys entering Epsom College
 (1855-1859)
Associate Electrical Engineers (Associate I. E. E.) (1939)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871 under the name of The Society of Telegraph Engineers, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. The list of members, corrected to 1 September 1939, gives the names and addresses of the various grades of members. Members (M. I. E. E.) and Associate Members (A. M. I. E. E.) were entitled to describe themselves as Chartered Electrical Engineers. Then there are the Associates (Associate I. E. E.), Companions (Companion I. E. E.), Graduates (Graduate I. E. E.) and Students (Student I. E. E.). The names are given in bold, surname first; before each name is the year of attaining that grade; and for the higher grades the year of each lower grade is also given, e. g. (G. 1931).

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Associate Electrical Engineers (Associate I. E. E.)
 (1939)
Chartered Electrical Engineers (M. I. E. E. and A. M. I. E. E.) (1951)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871 under the name of The Society of Telegraph Engineers, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. This list of members, corrected to 2 July 1951, gives the names and addresses of the Members (M. I. E. E.) and Associate Members (A. M. I. E. E.), all of whom were entitled to describe themselves as Chartered Electrical Engineers. The names are given in bold, surname first; before each name is the year of attaining the grade of Associate Member (AM) or Member (M); and, before the address, the year of reaching each lower grade is also given, e. g. (G. 1931), G standing for Graduate, S for Student. Where the engineer was also a member of one of the institution's specialized sections, this abbreviation is given, in bold: M, Measurements Section; R, Radio Section; S, Supply Section; U, Utilization Section.

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Chartered Electrical Engineers (M. I. E. E. and A. M. I. E. E.)
 (1951)
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