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Feron Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'feron'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 33 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Patent Rolls: entries for Lincolnshire (1275-1276)
Calendars of the patent rolls of the reign of king Edward I are printed in the Calendars of State Papers: but these cover only a fraction of the material on the rolls. From 1881 to 1889 the reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record Office also include calendars of other material from the rolls - about five times as many entries as in the State Papers - predominantly mandates to the royal justices to hold sessions of oyer and terminer to resolve cases arising locally; but also other general business. The calendar for the 4th year of king Edward I [20 November 1275 to 19 November 1276], hitherto unindexed, is covered here.

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Patent Rolls: entries for Lincolnshire
Inhabitants of London (1275-1298)
Liber Horn or the Lesser Black Book, now known as Letter Book A of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration. The letter books are so called because they were lettered from A to Z and from AA to ZZ, not because they were books of letters. Letter Book A was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe for the corporation and printed in 1899.

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Inhabitants of London
Norman Rolls (1200-1417)
The dukedom of Normandy is one of the appendages of the English crown, but actual possession of the dukedom was actively contested by the kings of France. During the periods of English power records were kept for Normandy similar to those of the royal administration in England, with enrolment of letters and grants of liberties and privileges and confirmations of previous enjoyed rights. The rolls for 1200 to 1205 and during the reassertion of English rule under Henry V in 1417, were edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy for the Commissioners of the Public Records, and published in 1835. Most of the persons mentioned are French inhabitants of Normandy or Englishmen in France, but there is also a long section (from page 122 onwards) of valuation of lands of Normans in England, where English jurors, county by English county, attest to acreage, numbers of cattle &c.

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Norman Rolls
Tradesmen of York (1272-1558)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city.Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 19,900 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year, the year being here reckoned as starting at Michaelmas (29 September) until 1373, and thence at Candlemas (2 February). Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; and those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

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Tradesmen of York
Yorkshire Marriage Licences (1596)
William Paver, a 19th-century Yorkshire genealogist, made brief abstracts of early marriage licences (now lost) in York Registry

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Yorkshire Marriage Licences
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1669-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
Irish Pensioners of William III's Huguenot Regiments: Galloway's Regiment (1702)
From an original return in Miscellaneous Bundle 17 of the Civil List books preserved in the Public Record Office, William A. Shaw prepared this abstract, published in 1902. The paper itself was entitled 'Abstract of the Examination of the French Pensioners now on the Civil List of the Establishment of Ireland'. The return was in book form with very wide pages, each folio or spread divided into eight columns. In his abstract the first number is the folio number; (a) is the name and station of the pensioner, either by first commission, second, or incorporated by warrant; (b) allowance on the establishment per diem; (c) where served and how long; (d) what substance and in what it consists; (e) what family they maintain; (f) able or not to serve, and why not; (g) when disbanded. In some cases some of the columns are blank in the original, and are ignored in this abstract. The least informative entries give just surname and rate of pension. Christian names are rarely given. The return is divided into two sections - Galloway's Regiment, and Old Pensioners. The latter include some women, presumably widows. The return was forwarded to the Lords Justices of Ireland as an appendix to a report, dated 29 June 1702, from Charles Dering, Auditor-General of Ireland. In all there were 590 pensioners, 398 being in Galloway's Regiment. Dering provided an analysis of the return, and annotated with an asterisk those 'absent out of the kingdom, dead or otherwised provided for, whose names are in the abstract blank'; with a dagger those 'that have been placed on the establishment by his late Majesty's warrants & have not served'; and with a double dagger those 'that have pensions above their stations markt upon the abstract.'

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Irish Pensioners of William III's Huguenot Regiments: Galloway's Regiment
State Papers Domestic (1702-1703)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State, as well as other miscellaneous records. 1 March 1702 to 31 May 1703. The calendar was prepared by Robert Pentland Mahaffy, with certain classes of document extracted and placed in separate appendices (called Tables): I, caveats; II, church and university appointments, &c.; III, commissions, warrants for commissions, notes of commissions and notes of warrants for commissions in the English army for 1702; IV, lord lieutenants and deputy lieutenants; V, Irish warrants; VI, weekly lists of ships of the Home Fleet with their stations and orders; VII, passes, notes of passes, post warrants and licences of absence; VIII, orders on petitions; IX, Scottish warrants and commissions; and X, miscellaneous royal warrants (to the Attorney or Solicitor General; in criminal cases; diplomatic; military warrants; miscellaneous warrants; secretary's warrants, allowance of bills, &c.; and notes of warrants for the appointment of almsmen). The source material in the Public Record Office that he drew on in making this compilation is referenced throughout, and is from the State Papers Domestic (and Military, Naval, Signet Office, Various, and Letter Books and Entry Books), State Papers Scotland (Correspondence, Letter Books and Warrants), State Papers Ireland (and King's Letter Books), and State Papers Channel Islands.

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State Papers Domestic
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1726)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 January to 31 December 1726

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Masters and Apprentices
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
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